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IronShadows28
01-23-2006, 02:28 AM
So I emailed this guitar teacher I saw an ad for after realizing I wasnt really learning much from my current one. He finally emailed me back telling me he could help me with my jazz band situation but he didnt say anything about acoustic/songwriting. He said his main genre was classic rock but he also teaches blues jazz and folk. He seems to be really a music theory teacher. He has a curriculum for his students. A curriculum. I dont know if he just teaches all his students the exact same thing but if he does then according to Tom Hess this is not a great teacher. Here is the "curriculum" he emailed me:


< FOR BEGINNERS >

ORIENTATION
- Guitar Neck Graphs
- Notes on the Neck
BASIC CHORDS
– Chords w Root on 6th String
– Movable Bar Chords w Root on 6th String
– Chords w Root on 5th String
– Movable Chords w Root on 5th String
– Common Chords – page 1
- “ “ - page 2
BLUES
– Blues Studies – page 1
- “ “ - page 2
- “ “ - page 3
– Minor Pentatonic & Blues Scale Patterns
- Pentatonic MN Sequences
SINGLE STRING TECHNIQUE
– Major Scale Patterns
– Melodic / Numeric Sequences (with audio supplement; 21 great exercises
which can be used for any 7 note scale or mode - e.g. Major scale, Melodic
minor scale, Harmonic minor).
TRIAD ARPEGGIOS
– Major
– Minor
7th CHORD ARPEGGIOS
– Major 7
– Minor 7
– Dominant 7
– Minor 7 b5
- Diminished 7
MUSICIANSHIP
- Note Values / Note Divisions
– Major Key Signatures
– Circle of 5ths
- “ “ “ w minor Keys

< FOR THE INTERMEDIATE STUDENT >

HARMONY & THEORY
– Intervals Explained
– Interval Exercise
– Major Scale Construction / Triad & 7th Chord Formulas
– Harmonized Major Scale & Modes
- “ Melodic Minor Scale & Modes

< FOR THE ADVANCED STUDENT >

JAZZ MELODIC MINOR STUDIES
– Scale Patterns
– minor Major 7 Arpeggios
– Major 7 + 5 Arpeggios
MORE JAZZ SCALES
– Chromatic Scale Pattern
– Wholetone Scale Shapes
– Diminished Scale Shapes
STACKED INTERVALS
– 4ths
– b5ths
BI-TONAL ARPEGGIOS
– A/G7
– E/G7
– Db/G7
ADVANCED SCALE PATTERNS
– Minor Pentatonic Shapes (Frank Gambale)
– Major Scale Patterns (F. G.)
– Melodic Minor Scale Patterns (F. G.)
– Major Scale Patterns (Alan Holdsworth) – page 1
- “ “ “ “ “ - page 2
– Melodic Minor Scale Patterns (A. H.) – page 1
– “ “ “ “ “ “ - page 2
JAZZ IMPROVISATION
– Scott Henderson Ideas (package) *There is a local guitar player, who is
",1]);//-->– Augmented
7th CHORD ARPEGGIOS
– Major 7
– Minor 7
– Dominant 7
– Minor 7 b5
- Diminished 7
MUSICIANSHIP
- Note Values / Note Divisions
– Major Key Signatures
– Circle of 5ths
- “ “ “ w minor Keys

< FOR THE INTERMEDIATE STUDENT >

HARMONY & THEORY
– Intervals Explained
– Interval Exercise
– Major Scale Construction / Triad & 7th Chord Formulas
– Harmonized Major Scale & Modes
- “ Melodic Minor Scale & Modes

< FOR THE ADVANCED STUDENT >

JAZZ MELODIC MINOR STUDIES
– Scale Patterns
– minor Major 7 Arpeggios
– Major 7 + 5 Arpeggios
MORE JAZZ SCALES
– Chromatic Scale Pattern
– Wholetone Scale Shapes
– Diminished Scale Shapes
STACKED INTERVALS
– 4ths
– b5ths
BI-TONAL ARPEGGIOS
– A/G7
– E/G7
– Db/G7
ADVANCED SCALE PATTERNS
– Minor Pentatonic Shapes (Frank Gambale)
– Major Scale Patterns (F. G.)
– Melodic Minor Scale Patterns (F. G.)
– Major Scale Patterns (Alan Holdsworth) – page 1
- “ “ “ “ “ - page 2
– Melodic Minor Scale Patterns (A. H.) – page 1
– “ “ “ “ “ “ - page 2
JAZZ IMPROVISATION
– Scott Henderson Ideas (package) *There is a local guitar player, who is
Henderson who teaches at MI in Los Angeles. Anyway, this is simply a
fantastic study, which I personally compiled (quite thoroughly).

CONTEMPORARY GUITAR PROGRAM


Course Objectives:

1) To learn fingerings for various chords, scales, and arpeggios.

2) To learn the principles of harmony & music theory.

3) To learn ear training and transcribing.

4) To study and analyze musical examples from recordings - of your choice.

5) To develop basic skills in reading music notation.



Materials used:

1) Folder for curriculum handouts.

2) “Modern Reading Text in 4/4,” by Louis Bellson, Gil Breines – (which can
be ordered through Noteworthy Sheet Music store, ph.# (502) 893-0448).
– Better yet, visit: zzounds.com/item- ("]amazon.com[/url] – Books – (Browse menu) Sheet Music & Scores
– (see) Search: Books – (type in) “Modern Reading” –
(click on) Go!
*This book is used to develop rhythmic ability.

3) Spiral book of 50 LINED index cards; (bring this to each lesson).

4) Student should have a quartz metronome (available at Steilberg String
Instruments, ph.# (502) 491-2337). I recommend the SABINE Zipbeat; to
compare price, shop online; e.g. visit: );//-->also named Scott Henderson; I'm not referring to him; but rather, the Scott
Henderson who teaches at MI in Los Angeles. Anyway, this is simply a
fantastic study, which I personally compiled (quite thoroughly).

CONTEMPORARY GUITAR PROGRAM


Course Objectives:

1) To learn fingerings for various chords, scales, and arpeggios.

2) To learn the principles of harmony & music theory.

3) To learn ear training and transcribing.

4) To study and analyze musical examples from recordings - of your choice.

5) To develop basic skills in reading music notation.



Materials used:

1) Folder for curriculum handouts.

2) “Modern Reading Text in 4/4,” by Louis Bellson, Gil Breines – (which can
be ordered through Noteworthy Sheet Music store, ph.# (502) 893-0448).
– Better yet, visit: amazon.com (http://amazon.com/) – Books – (Browse menu) Sheet Music & Scores
– (see) Search: Books – (type in) “Modern Reading” –
(click on) Go!
*This book is used to develop rhythmic ability.

3) Spiral book of 50 LINED index cards; (bring this to each lesson).

4) Student should have a quartz metronome (available at Steilberg String
Instruments, ph.# (502) 491-2337). I recommend the SABINE Zipbeat; to
compare price, shop online; e.g. visit: zzounds.com/item- (http://zzounds.com/item-) -SBNZIPBEAT

5) “Music Reading For Guitar,” by David Oakes – (which can be ordered
through Music Dispatch, ph.# 1-(800) 637-2852 --- ITEM #: HL695192). Or,
for better price, visit: <A onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)" href="http://amazon.com/" target=_blank> – Books – (Browse menu) Sheet Music &
Scores – (see) Search: Books – (type in) “Music Reading For Guitar” – (click
on) Go! *This book is for intermediate or advanced students,
only.


**Cancellation Policy: remember, 24 hours notice required, to cancel – or
you forfeit that lesson, with no refund. Steve’s ph. #: (502) 649-5467

INSTRUCTOR PROFILE

Steve Bouldin – Guitarist/Guitar Teacher
Home Studio: 1913 Dillon Drive, Louisville, KY 40205-2803
*located in the (Upper) Highlands, off Gardiner Lane - near the Watterson
264.
Phone: (502) 649-5467
E-mail: http://www.mi.edu ("]unclejeeves@hotmail.com

EDUCATION:

Musicians Institute - Los Angeles (visit: HYPERLINK &quot;www.mi.edu)
- Certificate of Graduation (GIT) - Class of 1985

University of Louisville
- Bachelor of Arts, English
*(This degree does qualify Steve as something of an expert, in guiding
students who write original song lyrics).

MUSICAL EXPERIENCE:

Steve began his musical career (at age 17) as a performer, in Louisville.
He was recruited to play in John Alagia’s band, for one year…a pretty good
start, considering that Alagia now produces records, for the likes of John
Mayer, and
Dave Matthews. (visit: HYPERLINK &quot;[url=")&quot;
",1]);//-->amazon.com ("") – Books – (Browse menu) Sheet Music &
Scores – (see) Search: Books – (type in) “Music Reading For Guitar” – (click
on) Go! *This book is for intermediate or advanced students,
only.




What do you think? He has pretty good credentials (GIT certificate, 5 years teaching experience), and I probably should learn music theory, Im just not sure I want to learn everything "class room" style like that. What thinks you?

widdly widdly
01-23-2006, 04:30 AM
I am amazed at what this guy has prepared for you. He seems very organized and his curriculum seems well thought out. I'm sure he would tailors things to meet your requirements. Much better than any teachers I've come across.

Maybe take one or two lessons just to see if you gel then take it form there. If I was in your area I would give this guy a try for lessons :D


The Scott Henderson package sounds good. Can you get me a copy ;)
________
Rd56 (http://www.yamaha-tech.com/wiki/Yamaha_RD56)

forgottenking2
01-23-2006, 06:03 AM
It seems like a great teacher to me. At least it looks like it in paper. I'd say give him a try and check out his style of teaching. If his lessons are as organized as his curriculum hang on to him with your life 'cause good teachers are HARD to find.

About teaching the same thing to students... um... that's what they do in Higher Education Institutions (such as University of North Texas and Berklee College of Music). You can choose the classes you take and (sometimes) the instructor for private lessons but teachers have a curriculum and you have to keep up with it. That's what forces you to be better. The whole "tayloring to each student" blah blah blah, it's just a sales pitch. You can vary the method that you use to explain the different concepts but ultimately you are teaching the same thing to everybody. Music is Music and that's all there is to it.

Jacko
01-23-2006, 04:05 PM
Looks like a safe bet going with that teacher. Especially when they have a plan like that set out for you. But at the end of the day most important thing about a teacher is if you like them and enjoy the time you spend there. So give it a try.

mattfnk
02-28-2006, 02:58 AM
This guy seems to have his stuff together, but you do have a point. Every student I have has a different cirriculum. I would ask him if you could contact some of his students to get their view on your concerns.

MK

SkinnyDevil
02-28-2006, 02:55 PM
I don't know Steve (he's in Louisville & I'm in Lexington), but his program looks excellent to me. Nothing wrong with a template or curriculum. I'm confident Tom Hess wasn't slagging the idea of a standardized curriculum - probably just talking about instructors who ignore the students' desires.

Sign up for a month and see how it goes.

silent-storm
03-01-2006, 04:07 AM
Nothing wrong with a template or curriculum. I'm confident Tom Hess wasn't slagging the idea of a standardized curriculum - probably just talking about instructors who ignore the students' desires.

Sign up for a month and see how it goes.

I agree. There's a big difference between having a 'plan' laid out and ignoring the students desires. In the grand scheme of things we all kind of end up learning the same things (what he listed), just with a different focus then others. What seperates a good teacher from a bad one is that often the bad ones have a hard time getting information across in a lot of different formats and explaining things in 10 different ways and often has little to do with what they are actually teaching...just the presentation is lacking. Something tells me that if someone is as organized and diverse as this guy seems to be, then he will be able to work his 'plan' around your needs.