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rwp
02-02-2006, 09:52 PM
Hi Folks;

One of my problems, is I have no difficulty revoicing chords to harmonize over the melody of a piece, however, if there is no chord present and the melody note is, let's say, a whole note for the entire measure, I find it extremely difficult to pull a chord out of the air to fill in the time and harmonize with the melody note --- any suggestions????????

Malcolm
02-03-2006, 12:41 AM
Tacet --An indication in the music that a performer is to be silent for some time.

We have several songs with the Tacet notation. Meaning the performer (the rhythm backup guys) are to be quite during this part. Normally it's for a bar, three words, etc.

Perhaps a Tacet is the thing to use in a case like this.

silent-storm
02-03-2006, 04:46 AM
well 99% of music has an underlying harmony, so even if there is just one note at some point in the song, the song as a whole has a chord progression.

So once you figure out what the progression is and how the melody note relates to the chord of the moment, try playing the root underneith the melody note. Then maybe the root and the 3rd of the chord, or just the 3rd. Then maybe a root, a 3rd and a 5th...etc etc etc.

silent-storm
02-03-2006, 04:46 AM
oh, and welcome to IBM

rwp
02-03-2006, 02:43 PM
Thanks for the advice. I played classical guitar for years and years, then listening to jazz got me hooked and I found that I understood theory could read composers music, but not apply theory like jazzers do, it is certainly a thinkers art.

peter_traj
06-03-2006, 04:24 AM
take a composition course with a GOOD teacher and all your questions will be answered

Malcolm
06-03-2006, 10:15 PM
Do a Google using the key word backcycle --- one word.

joeyd929
06-04-2006, 02:22 PM
a
Do a Google using the key word backcycle --- one word.

Have not looked it up yet but are you referring to the cycle of falling fifths. Like C F Bb Eb Ab Db Gb B E A D G ??

Poparad
06-04-2006, 08:57 PM
a

Have not looked it up yet but are you referring to the cycle of falling fifths. Like C F Bb Eb Ab Db Gb B E A D G ??

That's the idea of backcycling.

If your target chord is G major, you can stick infront of it chords from the cycle.

So while an original progression might be something like this:

| Am | D7 | G | G |

A backcyled progression could be:

| C# F# | B E | A D | G |


(The G in bar 4 being the target of resolution)