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the1andonly
03-21-2003, 03:58 AM
I just read paul nelson's 'master class' articale, and his whole idea is about tension and resolution chords is really cool. I had never thought of looking at it that way. so, from what I can gather, all the tension in the major scale is based on the 4th scale degree. is this true for the minor scale and other scales as well? and if so, what about the Lydian mode, with has a #4?

Zatz
03-21-2003, 03:53 PM
Actually I'm not sure I understood the article at the point where it goes about subdivision of triads into 2 types: resolved and unresolved. Of course, this idea is fundamental for building any progression but taking 4th degree presence as indication of instability puzzles me.


The fact is that all the chords in each individual column, are interchangeable within themselves. They're substitutes for each other resolved with resolved and unresolved with unresolved.

OK, here's what we've got:

Resolved subset: I, III, V, VI

I can't really think of interchanging for ex. I for V or vice versa unless their inversions are I/V (V in bass) and V but even in this case it wouldn't go like substitution.

What works fine for me is dividing the harmonized scale into such categories ruled by the presence or absence of the root note so that the resolved part would be:

R: I, III, VI

and the unresolved -

U: II, VI, V, VII.

Maybe I missed the point...

Kind regards,
Zatz.

szulc
03-22-2003, 01:55 PM
This is a very cool concept.
I think interms of TONIC (I) and DOMINANT (V).
(I guess because I liked Baroque music first, and then JAZZ)

In general any triad shares two notes with the triad a third above and a third below.

I believe a triad on any scale degree can safely be substituted by a triad a (diatonic) third below and a (diatonic) third above.
So,
vi for I , iii for I
viio for ii,VI for ii

I for iii, V for iii *This sub is weak for V because the active note is 4 which is not present in iii.

ii for IV, vi for IV
iii for V*, viio for V
IV for vi, I for vi
V for viio, ii for viio

Care must be taken when subbing for distinctly TONIC or DOMINANT sounds.

I would classify vi, I as TONIC;
ii, IV as SUBDOMINANT;
V,viio as DOMINANT;
and iii as either DOMINANT or TONIC (Mostly TONIC).


So how does this compare to the 4th being the decisive tone?

vi I iii TONIC SOUNDS (No 4th)
(I prefer them in this arrangement, because it shows the third below and above relationship in the correct order)

viio ii IV V7 SUBDOMINANT / DOMINANT SOUNDS (Contains 4th)

I think this makes sense to me now!

I think the article could have had better explanations of some of the things that were just tossed in.

For Instance:

Which is why to play a sitar for example one must sit on the floor to deal with quarter tone divisions in several octaves What in the hell does this have to do with having 24 frets per octave? Maybe the sitar has a big gourd at the headstock and is bulky?
Use a vocal choir as an example, individuals singing the low, middle and the high parts. It's the same as a chord you're just building what they sing individually all at once. What?
Lets look at everything in the Key G, it's a good key to work in on the guitar because you can play the entire key without it being interrupted by the neck stopping.What does playing in the key of G have to do with not running out of fretboard?
The key of G contains the letters G, A, B, C, D, E, F# and G again, following Ionian's step pattern. That's why you have separate sharp and flat Ionian keys. This is not a very clear explanation of why there are black and white keys on a piano or sharps and flats in different key signatures.
Go from at root to a seventh, to a third to a fifth or just play a root and a fifth. DO EVERYTHING TO AVOID PLAYING IN A ROW BOTH UP AND DOWN! The assumption here is that you want people to not play the Arpeggio in ascending or descending order? Or leave out the active 3rd and 7th?

Michel
03-22-2003, 02:01 PM
I love this article

if i got the point ? forget about scale and mode the article is about substituting arpeggio and playing solo over chord progression

Let's stay in Gmaj7 before i read this article on a Ami7 i woud have played Ami7 arpeggio and or A dorian scale.In this article we have to forget about scale Dorian Lydian Mixo....ect..

Now on a Ami7 if i play Cmaj7 or D7 or F#mi7b5 arpeggio i get 3 new color to play on Ami7 And yes it does open the sound

I love this article

Michel

Michel
03-22-2003, 03:16 PM
Hello Szulc

It is the idea that's important not its explanation.You are free to change the words to suit your own way of thinking

Joe Pass wrote that

Michel

szulc
03-22-2003, 04:10 PM
I think this is a sound idea, I just thought the parts that were added in were not very well explained.

Chim_Chim
03-23-2003, 03:39 AM
Interesting article but I just wish I could understand it better.
The substitution part of it makes enough sense because of the common tones between the chords but I don't get the whole tension and rest thing and how to apply it.I'd also like to understand how to apply arpeggios effectively.That part of the article was particularly interesting to me though I'm having difficulty understanding what the article means and how I can apply it to my playing to allow my playing to have more freedom.I guess inverting the arps makes sense but what about superimposing them from either the tension or the rest categories? That part isn't too clear to me.

Maybe I just have to keep reading it and re-reading it until I finally get it?

Perhaps Eric and Guni could sum up this article and then between them and szulc observations above we could make heads or tails of it ?

:confused: Chim

szulc
03-23-2003, 04:12 AM
I try to take another stab at trying to explain this (as I see it).

In classical music theory you first learn how to harmonize any melody using just the Tonic (I) and the Dominant (V7).

With a little practice you can pretty much harmonize anything using just these two chords.
It does get more complicated if you modulate (Change Keys) but in general this can work.
After a while they let you start using the SubDominant (IV), this starts to hep out in a few places where using I or V seems contrived.
Eventually they let you use all seven chords, and you can really make nice harmonies with all of those.

But the basic underlying TENSION and RELEASE is based on the Dominant resolving to the Tonic.
In C major the Tonic seventh chord is CEGB (CM7) or CEGA (CM6), the Dominant is GBDF (G7 ).

Do you notice that the highly active 7th of the G7 chord is F or the Fourth degree of the C major scale?

When I use the term active I am referring to the tonal magnetism or tendency of F to resolve to E (or sometimes G).
This is the basis for tension and release.

Now just like the Classical Theory student studying voice leading you don't have to limit your self to V7 and I.

It is, however, convieniant at times, to think only in terms of this simple Dominant to Tonic relationship.

I beleive that this is what is being referred to in this article.

So in conclusion:
There two classes of Seventh chord; those that contain the highly active 4th degreee (7th of the Dominant chord) and those that do not.

All those who can substitute for the Dominant sound contain the 4th degree and those which cannot, do not.

PaulN
03-23-2003, 09:43 AM
Response to received email which read:

From Szulc
(IbreatheMusic Advisor)



I studied this and realized that it is similar to my approach (TONIC/DOMINANT).


Very Cool Ideas.

* Thanks for the compliment but in reading your approach it is limited and sorry to say does not resemble mine in any way conceptually nor by ease of application for students.

The communication of them, could be better.

Some of the things that were tossed in were difficult to make the connection with.

* Sorry I never just toss.

See this thread for details.

Thanks for contributing.

*?



This is a very cool concept.

* Ok?

I think in terms of TONIC (I) and DOMINANT (V).
(I guess because I liked Baroque music first, and then JAZZ)

In general any triad shares two notes with the triad a third above and a third below.

I believe a triad on any scale degree can safely be substituted by a triad a (diatonic) third below and a (diatonic) third above.
So,
vi for I, iii for I
viio for ii,VI for ii
ii for IV, vi for IV
iii for V*, viio for V
IV for vi, I for vi
V for viio, ii for viio

* God I hate little ii's !


I for iii, V for iii *This sub is weak for V because the active note is 4 which is not present in iii.

* In reading my article you have mixed up the triadic V DF#A no4 (Resolved) with the V7 D7 DF#AC (Unresolved) which contains the 4th degree as explained in EX:2 and 3 I would offer this more contemporary progression as an example for your listenig pleasure.

l D/G l D/E l C/A l C/D l *simple I VI II V with subs (R) (R) (U) (U)

In my artical the D triad has been offered as an added bonus to make the reader aware of it's ability to be used as an alternate arpeggio when improvising or as a straight ahead chordal "sub" thought over a I, III, or VI chord.



Care must be taken when subbing for distinctly TONIC or DOMINANT sounds.

* And it has only in a hipper way! D/G = G(DF#A) - Gmaj9 no 3rd only if the chord were a full dominant 7th would it then be unresolved.The good Jazz, Fusion and rock players do it every day...Steve Kahn, Jeff Beck, Henderson, Johnson, Vai, Stern...

I would classify vi, I as TONIC;
ii, IV as SUBDOMINANT;
V,viio as DOMINANT;
and iii as either DOMINANT or TONIC (Mostly TONIC).

* Key of G, B-7 (III -7) (R) = B(DF#A), looks like a D triad in there! (Mostly TONIC) Sorry but I can't buy into the term.

So how does this compare to the 4th being the decisive tone?

vi I iii TONIC SOUNDS (No 4th)
(I prefer them in this arrangement, because it shows the third below and above relationship in the correct order)


viio ii IV V7 SUBDOMINANT / DOMINANT SOUNDS (Contains 4th)


I think this makes sense to me now!

* OK? You have condensed your 12 rule substitute 4 part category approach into my 2 sound concept! Also you can lose those misleading tonic and dominant descriptions and all those funny little lower case i's. So now that you think you've got it figured out enough to the point that you have been explaining my concepts to others by relating it to yours. I hope your sitting down for what I'm about to say. Any major key is nothing more than (in this case the key of G) one big (G)Maj7 or (G)Maj7th suspended chord. Please e-mail me for a precise explination of this concept (when I'm available) before you describe it to others.


I think the article could have had better explanations of some of the things that were just tossed in.

* Tossed!!!?


For Instance:


quote:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Which is why to play a sitar for example one must sit on the floor to deal with quarter tone divisions in several octaves

*Just a visual to explain to those starting off the concept of 1/4 tones without getting to deep.
__________________________________________________ ___________

What in the hell does this have to do with having 24 frets per octave? Maybe the sitar has a big gourd at the headstock and is bulky?

* Apparently you haven't seen a Sitar up close. I'll do the math. 12 x 2 = 24,1/4 tones per octave meaning a lot of space to bend between huge frets to attain those pitches making for one big heavy instrument. So we should be thankful for the minimal 12 tones we have. Actually there are gourds at both ends!

quote:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Use a vocal choir as an example, individuals singing the low, middle and the high parts. It's the same as a chord you're just building what they sing individually all at once.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

What?

* What??

* Again just an example for those starting out to visually understand harmony (chords) as different notes (Voices) stacked together.

quote:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lets look at everything in the Key G, it's a good key to work in on the guitar because you can play the entire key without it being interrupted by the neck stopping.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

What does playing in the key of G have to do with not running out of fretboard?

* When dealing with standard 5 close hand scale positions for the first time the key of G is ideal (position 1, 3rd fret) as it allows you to play them completely in order 1-5. One can concentrate on the unaltered shapes of these positions without the interruption of the guitar visually splitting a scale position at the nut or forcing a student to begin position 1 of a different major key higher up the neck putting the positions out of numeric order ex: 34512. Not to mention the 7 extended positions.

quote:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The key of G contains the letters G, A, B, C, D, E, F# and G again, following Ionian's step pattern. That's why you have separate sharp and flat Ionian keys.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is not a very clear explanation of why there are black and white keys on a piano or sharps and flats in different key signatures.

* Assuming a student now follows and understands the ww1/2www1/2 concept from each note allowed to us in the 12 note system as explained in the opening section my article. This small statement will explain why starting the Ionian step pattern from 12 different notes is giving them keys containing different amounts of sharps flats. I'll cover this more in depth in future articles.

quote:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Go from at root to a seventh, to a third to a fifth or just play a root and a fifth. DO EVERYTHING TO AVOID PLAYING IN A ROW BOTH UP AND DOWN!
------------------------------------------------------------------------

The assumption here is that you want people to not play the Arpeggio in ascending or descending order? Or leave out the active 3rd and 7th?

* That's right! And how musically individual they would all become? Calling a 3 or 7 "Active " is a very misleading description which gives the student an impression of movement. In all actuality the 3 and 7 as well as 1 and 5 are properly termed "Chord Tones" which are at rest with a chord. And while the 3 and 7 do characterize the family type of a chord Maj/Min or Dom. that doesn't mean they have to be played over each chord. That would be something a beginning student would do to bring out the sound of each chord with the hopes of eventually moving ahead to "coloring" what already exists in the harmony!

quote:
Go from at root to a seventh, to a third to a fifth or just play a root and a fifth

* If you noticed I did mention the 3rd and 7th as your example quoting me in my article states!? So let me get this right once one learns an arpeggio one should play all those tones in order and "God forbid" they leave out the "Active" 3 and or 7th (which are already stated in the harmony of the moment). A player like that would become a prisoner to the harmony not to mention maintaining a lesser knowledge and use of pentatonic "sub" thoughts some of which contain neither the 3rd nor 7th in their 5 note groupings yet still are used to outline movement of chord changes in modern music a tool used by Miles and Coltrane as well...
__________________
Thought provokingly yours!
Enjoy the concept I see some of you are starting to get it...

Paul Nelson
www.paulnelsonguitar.com

szulc
03-23-2003, 01:44 PM
Thanks for clearing some of these things up.

Apparently you haven't seen a Sitar up close. I'll do the math. 12 x 2 = 24,1/4 tones per octave meaning a lot of space to bend between huge frets to attain those pitches making for one big heavy instrument. The number of frets (subdivisions into microtones) on a stringed instrument has nothing to do with why you sit on the floor! I have seen 33 fret guitars with 25" scale length. Maybe a violin is a better example since it has an infinate number of frets. It seems you are referring to scale length here (correct me if you think I am wrong).
When dealing with standard 5 close hand scale positions for the first time the key of G is ideal (position 1, 3rd fret) as it allows you to play them completely in order 1-5. One can concentrate on the unaltered shapes of these positions without the interruption of the guitar visually splitting a scale position at the nut or forcing a student to begin position 1 of a different major key higher up the neck putting the positions out of numeric order ex: 34512. Not to mention the 7 extended positions. Since your concept is purely a musical one and not limited to guitar, I don't see why this is relevant. A person should be able to execute passages on his/her instrument using these ideas regardless of position or order of position. And why the adherance to playing things(positions) in order here anyway?
First of all there are 12 notes in all of music called a chromatic scale this allows you to build 12 different majors scales from each note using what's called a step pattern.......The key of G contains the letters G, A, B, C, D, E, F# and G again, following Ionian's step pattern. That's why you have separate sharp and flat Ionian keys.
........Assuming a student now follows and understands the ww1/2www1/2 concept from each note allowed to us in the 12 note system as explained in the opening section my article.
I still think this is a pretty big leap of faith.
It's the same as a chord you're just building what they sing individually all at once. I think here you could have left this part "what they sing individually all at once. " out and it would have been sufficient. It was less confusing without this.

Is the reason you singled out the V triad as resolved, because it it the only unaccounted for Triad not in the resolved column (of 4 note chords), that doesn't contain the 4th?
So the idea here is to treat the triad differently harmonically than the seventh chord?

In classical music theory the 3rd of the V triad resolves up to the root of the I triad. Which is one of two places in the scale where there is a half step between the note of tension and the note of resolution. So why don't you consider this a Tension or unresolved chord? If you choose the special case where you don't include the 3rd I can see it. It seems that the 7-1 resolution is as important as 4-3 or 4-5. Why, in your words, is it not?

Chim_Chim
03-23-2003, 11:36 PM
I'm starting to get this article now.After printing it out and sitting down and trying this stuff out things are starting to make sense for me.

If you were like me and having trouble understanding this then I suggest you try print the article and sit down with your guitar and this article in front of you and start trying the the stuff out.
It made a big difference for me.


Some observations:

The only difference between the Triad category and the Seventh chord category is that the V triad is RESOLVED and the V7 chord is UNRESOLVED (duh!) There are very obvious harmonic and melodic implications to this.

If you have I IV V triad progression the V isn't the tension chord the IV is!!!! (...this is where I began to think about what the whole concept of this article actually means...)

If the harmony is triad based you can play SEVENTH arpeggios subbed from the proper R or U column over their respective R or U triads.

[To add to what PaulN said in the article about playing anything but straight 1 3 5 7 obvious,boring arpeggios over the same 1 3 5 7 in the harmony...Of course this is great advice he gave and as he said you've really got to mix the ideas up,invert the arpeggios,and all that....

*I'd also point out that playing Subbed arpeggios played in different registers(different octaves) can also make a huge difference as to whether it sounds good or not, so experiment with this as well as everything else mentioned.]

I think I now share Michel's enthusiam for this article!

While I was somewhat familiar with the ideas presented in this article I was never able to fully apply them or understand them beyond the basic "chords a third apart sub for eachother because they have two notes in common".I knew there was more to this and I suspected there were some heavy soloing implications...the Ebb and Flow of Tension and Release really does exist AND IT WORKS!

Now it makes sense!

This was a great article Paul,you've cleared some things up for me. THANKYOU!

Chim_Chim:D

Michel
03-25-2003, 02:34 AM
Hello Chim Chim

Making sense and PRACTICAL use of music theory !
That's wy i love this article......... PRACTICAL...... ;)

*I'd also point out that playing Subbed arpeggios played in different registers(different octaves) can also make a huge difference as to whether it sounds good or not, so experiment with this as well as everything else mentioned.]

Let's stay in Gmaj7
Let' take Am7 up for 2 octaves
1 3 5 7 9 11 13
A B C D E F# G A B C D E f# G and A Again

Am7=ACEG=1 3 5 7
We substitute A C E G for C E G B
CEGB=3 5 7 9 .....Not 3 5 7 2
We substitute A C E G for D F# A C
DF#AC=11 13 1 and 3......... Not 4 6 1 an 3
We substitute A C E G for F# A C E
F#ACE=13 1 3 5 not 6 1 3 5

You see the 9 B the 11 D and the 13 F# are the overtones of Am7 so if you use these substitution over Am7 play one octave or more higher let's say middel and higher register
so the 9 the 11 and the 13 will come alive

Merci Michel

If you like to clash use them in a low register

PaulN
03-25-2003, 03:20 AM
Sorry but this will have to be the last correspondence to the "advisor" as I feel no more explanations to the majority of comments and questions regarding the wording and or rewording (ie: Sitars, Vocal Choirs, and Guitar positions) of Master Class rather than the more important content are needed after having posted this and the previous letter. This lesson speaks for itself and from now on only questions related to the Master Class's approach (not its delivery to others) and any guitar related matters will be answered. I have to keep this a public not private lesson and welcome ernest questions from all of those whom have found my approach helpful and enlightening.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Apparently you haven't seen a Sitar up close. I'll do the math. 12 x 2 = 24,1/4 tones per octave meaning a lot of space to bend between huge frets to attain those pitches making for one big heavy instrument.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The number of frets (subdivisions into microtones) on a stringed instrument has nothing to do with why you sit on the floor! I have seen 33 fret guitars with 25" scale length. Maybe a violin is a better example since it has an infinite number of frets. It seems you are referring to scale length here (correct me if you think I am wrong).

* It does when it comes to the sitar (which is not the reason for this article) an intrustrument having almost pinky sized heavy weight frets not to mention the fact that it is the most widely accepted instrument associated with the usage of the Eastern world 24 pitch system which is what I was discussing in the first place. I'd say it was a pretty good reference. Using a violin? (a fretless instrument!) As a way of giving a student a clear visual and mental audio example of fret division and of Eastern culture that's not something they could grasp? And I guess if I had of used the 33 fret 25" scale length guitar as an example citing the extra weight as a humorous aside it the article we would now be stuck discussing guitar strap tension and fret gauges. Let get off this!

quote:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
When dealing with standard 5 close hand scale positions for the first time the key of G is ideal (position 1, 3rd fret) as it allows you to play them completely in order 1-5. One can concentrate on the unaltered shapes of these positions without the interruption of the guitar visually splitting a scale position at the nut or forcing a student to begin position 1 of a different major key higher up the neck putting the positions out of numeric order ex: 34512. Not to mention the 7 extended positions.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Since your concept is purely a musical one and not limited to guitar, I don't see why this is relevant. A person should be able to execute passages on his/her instrument using these ideas regardless of position or order of position. And why the adherence to playing things(positions) in order here anyway?

*Yes, the concept is purely musical and is not limited to any one instrument and am sorry but in viewing this web site and everyone pictured holding a guitar I just figured this was a guitar site!? As far as positions please read my words more thoroughly "scale positions for*** the first time*** the key of G is ideal." And if you remember my closing statement as to not playing scales diatonically (in a row) and or arpeggios ascending or descending when improvising.
quote:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
First of all there are 12 notes in all of music called a chromatic scale this allows you to build 12 different majors scales from each note using what's called a step pattern.......The key of G contains the letters G, A, B, C, D, E, F# and G again, following Ionian's step pattern. That's why you have separate sharp and flat Ionian keys.
........Assuming a student now follows and understands the ww1/2www1/2 concept from each note allowed to us in the 12 note system as explained in the opening section my article.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

I still think this is a pretty big leap of faith.

*The title of my article is "Master Class" I think musicians are smart enough to know what they are in for and the need to read and reread the article. And to also understand that what you labeled as "Tossed" in ideas were actually thought out references to ease in their understanding of the material as well as to lead to offshoots of thought which could be open for discussion. Which, judging by all the responses I've read and received have been very positive especially in the willingness to open up their minds to this approach and drop what obviously has not been working for them.


quote:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
It's the same as a chord you're just building what they sing individually all at once.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
I think here you could have left this part "what they sing individually all at once. " out and it would have been sufficient. It was less confusing without this.

*I appreciate your attempt to correct my grammar which I'm not quite sure is you responsibility as advisor but if you read the statement slower and digest what I'm saying your shortened version would delete the conception of the single note chord relationship. Lets get off this one as well! Shall we!?

Is the reason you singled out the V triad as resolved, because it is the only unaccounted for Triad not in the resolved column (of 4 note chords), that doesn't contain the 4th?
So the idea here is to treat the triad differently harmonically than the seventh chord?

*Yes.

In classical music theory the 3rd of the V triad resolves up to the root of the I triad. Which is one of two places in the scale where there is a half step between the note of tension and the note of resolution. So why don't you consider this a Tension or unresolved chord? If you choose the special case where you don't include the 3rd I can see it. It seems that the 7-1 resolution is as important as 4-3 or 4-5. Why, in your words, is it not?

*Now this is the type of questions you should have been asking!
The I maj7th chord in any major key contains the following chord tones 1 3 5 7 (as do all Major7th chords) proving that a half step 7-1 relationship is already inherent in all major 7th chords. 7-1 tension can be heightened and decreased depending upon the chords voicing (meaning how far these two are separated within or outside of the octave). So if the target chord of resolution already contains the 1 and 7 (which you would probably term "The Leading tone") where is the actual resolution if these 2 tones which are universally accepted tones at rest with this type chord? Nowhere!!! Why? Because your confusing the issue by mixing old school classical triadic cadence theory which focusses on the 7 (3rd of the V chord) going to 1. You said it yourself "Which is one of ***two places*** in the scale where there is a half step between the note of tension and the note of resolution" when actually there is only one real place of Tension and Resolution called "Suspension." The V to I cadence is not a resolution theoretically Key of G: V, (D F# A) to I, (GBD) especially if you look at it this way GB(DF#A) = Gmaj9. Now this is real resolution of tension (Suspension)! EX: V7 (DF#AC) to I maj7 (GBDF#) or (G)DF#AC = Gmaj9 sus to Gmaj7th GBDF# (Notice how the "C" note moves and how the F# stays stationary). What this means is that it is the movement of the 4th that outlines the true change between the Unresolved and Resolved chords in a key. Why? Because! " The 4th degree of a major scale unresolves that key therefore any chord containing the 4 in it's tone center is considered Unresolved and any that doesn't contain the 4 is considered Resolved"

Play a C note over a I, III or VI (and a D triad) and you will HAVE to move it down one half step to the 3rd or up a whole step to the 5th! Now play that same C note over II, IV, V and VII and you will find no need to move the tone anywhere. Try that with the F#(7) and the G (1) over the same chords and you'll find no distinct separation of the Resolved and Unresolved groups!!!

I can understand your "Tonic/Dominant" way of thinking, I had it at Berklee. Music colleges and uninformed classically or otherwise trained teachers have been frustrating musicians for years with their misinformed analysis and as a result one great musician out of thousands slips through the cracks. The funny thing is that that player whether they can explain it or not is applying a major portion of this approach. The Jazz and Fusion greats apply it all.

PaulN
03-25-2003, 03:29 AM
Register is in the Ear of the beholder.
But Congratulations! You and Chim have trully realized the approach
Music will be more fun for you from now on!
I promise
Paul Nelson
www.paulnelsonguitar.com

Chim_Chim
03-25-2003, 03:46 AM
Works for me !
:D

szulc
03-26-2003, 02:47 AM
Thanks Paul!
I am eagerly anticipating your continuation of this concept in future articles.
I truly appreciate any open discussion revolving around improvisation or conceptual analysis of improvisation.

I am very interested in the expanision of this using Pentatonic scales.

Where did you learn this?
Can you give some examples with notation of Miles or Coltrane using this?

Show us more.

Chim_Chim
03-26-2003, 05:55 AM
Hey szulc,

I mentioned in an earlier post that I was semi familiar with this but didn't quite understand.

Here's a link to where a first saw this concept:

click (http://guitarmain.com/tal.html)



I'm curious about minor key applications of this and with the V7 in a minor key I would think another tension note enters the picture,atleast over the V7 in a minor key?

...ooh,and I'm also curious about how this applies to "the blues"?