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Black-Mantra
08-15-2006, 11:53 AM
Hi,
I've been going through my book on how to read music, and I have a firm grasp on it, everything is fine up until you ask me to apply it to the guitar. I was reading through some articles that confused me, something about how sheetmusic for guitar is played an octave lower than written. Basically, I am just asking for help on starting to apply sheetmusic to the guitar, I know it sounds stupid, but Im confuddled on this one :rolleyes: . Thanks for your time :D

joeyd929
08-15-2006, 08:44 PM
Hi,
I've been going through my book on how to read music, and I have a firm grasp on it, everything is fine up until you ask me to apply it to the guitar. I was reading through some articles that confused me, something about how sheetmusic for guitar is played an octave lower than written. Basically, I am just asking for help on starting to apply sheetmusic to the guitar, I know it sounds stupid, but Im confuddled on this one :rolleyes: . Thanks for your time :D

Guitar is actually an octave higher than the notes used but it doesn't matter because once you know where the notes are you can read anything for guitar.

One thing I would recommend for guitar is learn to recognize groups of notes, and how they would look physically on the guitar. A great place to start is with the perfect fifth interval.

For example, play A and E on the 5th and 7th frets, strings 5 and 6.. This is a perfect fifth interval. Getting used to recognizing two notes intervals can speed up reading.

But you are correct, the guitar is actually one octave higher than the notes we use on the staff. Middle C is the note on the 6th string, fret number 8. In reality, you are actually playing the C that is the third space up on the G clef.

If guitar was not translated in this manner, you would have notes way too far above the staff. It's bad enough with the high E string, On guitars with 22 frets, the highest note is a D. This is D with 6 lines above the staff.

Good luck.

Poparad
08-15-2006, 11:25 PM
You have the backwards. The guitar sounds one octave below music written in concert pitch.

The C on the 8th fret of the 6th string is actually the 2nd space C in the bass clef. Actual sounding middle C is on the 1st fret of the 2nd string.

When reading music written for guitar, everything is already transposed, so middle C is the 3rd fret 5th string/8th fret 6th string. When dealing with non-transposed music, simply play one octave higher than written.

Black-Mantra
08-17-2006, 12:15 PM
Thanks for the replies guys, that interval idea is a good one, Ill definitely put time into that for sure. So I guess knowing where the octaves are on the fretboard is important in knowing were each note will be placed on the fretboard, am I right? If so then I think I can get this nailed down for good...please pardon my stupidity.

Malcolm
08-17-2006, 12:46 PM
Now lets take it to the fretboard.
First position -- nut to 4th fret all 6 strings -- same as our open string chord positions.

Middle C is on the 5th string 3rd fret.
Ledger notes below the clif are on the 6th and 5th string
Ledger notes above the clif are on the 1st string -- just go on up the neck.
Standard notation identifies the sharps and flats so just adjust.

You can play any scale in the first position -- nut to 4th fret. Plenty of time to move into another position after you get comfortable with first position.

Have fun. :cool:

Poparad
08-17-2006, 03:00 PM
Perhaps this will help. Attatched below is a PDF of a chart showing where each of the notes on the fretboard fall on the staff. This would be for transposed guitar music.

Black-Mantra
08-18-2006, 12:15 PM
Thanks guys thats nailed it for sure. Thanks for that chart Poparad, it was good to see in that way, very very much appreciated. Many kudos to you both ^_^

regards Riku Souma :D