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mansouros
11-01-2006, 11:36 AM
hi i'm new to the forum, been here a few times, so i thought it's about time for me to make a post.

i am on an ear training program that helps you develop perfect pitch.
on one of the excerizes it said compare all the notes (c to b) to visual colors..
so here i am on my second attempt, 2 o'clock in the morning, and i'm finally on the last note "B", so as i'm listening carefully while tapping the key over and over again to capture the sound, suddenly this strange sound comes out the "B." it happend so quick while i was tapping before i realized it even happened. I was shocked.

it was like i was hearing "laa...laa....LAAA...laa" (laa meaning note played once, and big LAAA stands for the strange sound i heard), just to give u a picture of how it felt like to me, the B was still a B, but it felt different in my ear.

as i continued with the training the same thing happened with different notes, and it's always on and off.

Is this what u guys all ear straining, or can't it be that i'm just goin in the right direction and thats exactly what i'm supposed to hear?:cool:

has anyone expereinced this before, if so what is it?

and yes i did try it with different with the keyboard i have at home and the piano at near by college

thanx :)

joeyd929
11-01-2006, 11:51 AM
So are you saying that even though you were listening to the same note that it sounded a bit different to you when the colors changed?

mansouros
11-01-2006, 12:02 PM
i mean a B sounds like B and a C always sounds C. But when thing happens (Like i said it's on and off), let's use the note "G" for example, if i'm listening to it over and over again, that wierd "G" and it if it does come it stays till the note fades out, it feels different through the entire note (but it still feels like "G") and it comes again a couple of times every piano session..

for instance..

i'm on G again, and i'm pressing the key of "G"..

---Normal "G"-----Weird "G"------Normal "G"----Normal "G"...on and off and almost rare

maybe it is the sound color that i'm suppose to hear, if that what you meant by the question, but the thing is i really don't what it is..

thanx for you reply, very appreciated :)

joeyd929
11-01-2006, 12:11 PM
Do you have any experience with relative pitch? That is where you know your key and hear a note you can determine how it relates to the key.

For example, if you are in the key of C Major and the you hear a G. You can tell it is a perfect fifth because you know what a 5th sounds like.

It is different than perfet pitch.

check out www.teoria.com (http://www.teoria.com)

Great free web site with lots of ear training. They don't really cover perfect pitch but acquiring all forms of "pitch" are good. Perfect and/or relative.

mansouros
11-01-2006, 09:04 PM
it's not really about relative pitch at all, it's about gaining perfect pitch, so my question is this wat perfect pitch would sound like?

joeyd929
11-01-2006, 09:14 PM
If you have perfect pitch then you could be blindfolded while someone plays note or notes and you would be able to know exactly where and what the note is.

Relative pitch is easier because you have something to compare it to. The jury is still out on perfect pitch. Some believe you have to be born with it while others claim you can be trained to have it.

Perfect pitch itself would be like if I said "Hum Ab that is on the 6th string 4th fret and without any other form of reference other than your mind, you would be able to hum the exact note.

silent-storm
11-01-2006, 09:26 PM
it's possible that this may be how you hear perfect pitch. It's tough to say because everyone experiences it and discovers it differently. I discovered it on a much more holistic level, where slowly every G that I heard started to sound different, not one good one out of nowhere followed by others that all sounded the same. That doesn't mean what you are doing is wrong, but if you go down this path for a long time and don't see any improvement in how frequent these "different" G's show up, you may want to explore other options.

joeyd929
11-01-2006, 10:08 PM
I was just thinking about this. You know how difinitive a Major chord sounds as opposed to a minor chord, right.. Every note has it's own wavelength and maybe people with perfect pitch can here the subtle differences in vibration or something crazy like that, which allows them to decipher each note by itself? Any takers?

LIke if you play a Major triad, and then play a minor triad, the difference is obvious. Wavelengths for every note are different so maybe there is something to it?

joeyd929
11-01-2006, 10:37 PM
Most people that have perfect pitch use the piano to prove this, or to test/learn it. A piano has 88 keys, but a total of 250 strings I believe.

Many of the notes have multiple strings to achieve the sound a piano has. Maybe it is this string grouping that makes each note different? I'm stuck at work until 7:30 but it has been a slow day so I'm thinking about all this stuff just to kill time. Can't wait to get out and go home to play a little tonight.

mansouros
11-01-2006, 11:04 PM
it's possible that this may be how you hear perfect pitch. It's tough to say because everyone experiences it and discovers it differently. I discovered it on a much more holistic level, where slowly every G that I heard started to sound different, not one good one out of nowhere followed by others that all sounded the same. That doesn't mean what you are doing is wrong, but if you go down this path for a long time and don't see any improvement in how frequent these "different" G's show up, you may want to explore other options.

on the lessons that i'm taking David did explain through out the first few lessons that pitch (or colors) would come and go in the beginning, but he contradicts himself by saying that a "G" would always sound like "G"... soo, i think maybe everyone expereinces the perfect pitch training in a different way..

thanx man :)

Elcon
11-02-2006, 01:49 PM
mansouros:
On the lessons that i'm taking David did explain through out the first few lessons that pitch (or colors) would come and go in the beginning, but he contradicts himself by saying that a "G" would always sound like "G"...

I do not think he contradicts himself when saying that really.

Ofcourse each tone will stay that same tone, no matter the context it is in. No matter played this way of that way, with this timbre or that volume.

The "color" is there when you recognize the tone (I don't believe hearing the color means to also know what the tone is immediatly)

I still perceive this "come and go" of tone-recognition/color. Yet, I believe to experience the "colors" more clearly now and it comes to me more often then the "go".

Take care,

Elcon

mansouros
11-04-2006, 05:36 AM
thanx again man, for aslo replying on this thread :)

very apperciated.