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Guni
10-15-2002, 11:00 PM
Hola,

Seven Days includes some very nice rhythm guitar parts. Interesting is that the tune is in 5/4. The guitar part is played together with some strings. Very nice chords - pure Sting sound :D .

Here are the first 8 bars of the verse (the second time through there's a straight E major chord in the last 2 bars).

Have fun.

http://www.ibreathemusic.com/forums/posts/7days.gif

Zatz
10-16-2002, 03:54 PM
Hola, Guni!


Very nice chords - pure Sting sound

Sting really likes these 6/9, add9, sus2 chords and quartal inversions like those in Bb69 and F69. Maybe it's one of his signatures though there are plenty of tools in his music bag. I love his music. And I'm going to try your tab when I get home tonight. Lots of great tabs on the forums lately - that's getting more and more inspiring!
Thanks!

Ultra mega best regards,
Zatz.

Guni
10-16-2002, 09:54 PM
Hi Zatz,

Glad ya like it. How's it going with 5/4?

Anyway, here's the next part, which I think has got an awesome feel to it. I haven't tabed it out yet but here are the chords:

Fmaj7 | F#-7b5 | G | G#o7 | Am | F | G | G#o7 | Am | Bb#11 | Am | Bb#11 | Am | Fmin(maj7) | C69 |

Guni

Zatz
10-18-2002, 01:15 PM
Hi Guni!

Thanks for chord progression sequel! I tried to play 5/4 timing on Seven Days from memory - I didn't find it on my "The best of..." CD and I want to compare my playing with Sting's track to make sure I'm doing it right. Cos I've come across 5/4 just several times in my life - I guess Queen used it somewhere (can't tell where exactly) and in USA anthem :) which I never got to play on guitar :D
Actually I should definitely fill up my CD repository at the expense of some gallons of beer I hit every day :)

I have a couple of questions:

1. What do you mean by F#-7b5? Is it just F#7b5?
2. Do you play 3rd in Bb#11?

Thanks again for your tabs!

Ultra mega best regards,
Zatz.

Guni
10-18-2002, 02:00 PM
Originally posted by Zatz
1. What do you mean by F#-7b5? Is it just F#7b5?
2. Do you play 3rd in Bb#11?Hi Zatz,

Sorry, I use the "-" and "m" symbol depending on the current air pressure. Both stand for minor. The chord is F#m7b5.

This Bb#11 gave me some headache. I have come to the conclusion that it's a Bb 7, with a 9 and a #11 and no 3rd. Ya can call it Bb7sus2#11 if you like. Here's the fingering:

x
5
5
6
x
6

Guni

Zatz
10-18-2002, 05:44 PM
Thanks, Guni!

Actually I'm always having problems with half-diminished chords usage like in

"Fmaj7 | F#m7b5 | G" part.

Would it be just the melody note that makes sense for using Xm7b5 instead of Xo7 within chromatic progressions or is there some other harmonic reason for that?

Considering the fact that Xm7b5 could be put as (X+m3)m6 we could rewrite the progression this way:

"Fmaj7 | Am/F# | G"

I must be having problem with harmonic meaning of Xm7b5 chords in general :( And try to avoid thinking in terms of half-diminished chords. Maybe it's just all about the personal approach but still I'd like to grasp the point about HD-chords. Could you please give me a hint?

Zatz.

Guni
10-19-2002, 08:22 AM
Originally posted by Zatz Would it be just the melody note that makes sense for using Xm7b5 instead of Xo7 within chromatic progressions or is there some other harmonic reason for that?The melody note is important. In this case the melody note of the chords is the note c. So in theory you could either use F#m7b5 or F#o7.

So why is Sting using F#m7b5?

Overall, the tune is in the key of C. F#m7b5 is the #IVm7b5, which does have some special functions in harmony.

1) It is commonly found as the relating II of V7/III:
F#m7b5 B7 Em7

2) Used as an approach chord to V7
F#m7b5 G7

3) resolves to the I with the 5th in the base
F#m7b5 C/G

4) can resolve to IV or IVm
F#m7b5 Fmaj7
or G7 F#m7b5 F-6

I think that's it.


Considering the fact that Xm7b5 could be put as (X+m3)m6 we could rewrite the progression this way:

"Fmaj7 | Am/F# | G"Yes you can but harmonically F#m7b5 does make more sense for the way the chord is working in this situation, ie as an approach chord to V.

Next to all the whys above it can be seen as a voiceleading decission, as only one note changes between the Fmaj7 and F#m7b5 chord, ie the root. This sounds a bit smoother. On the other hand he is using a G#o chord for the movement G Go7 Am.

To sum it up: This progression looks like it's coming straight out of a jazz harmony book demonstrating the functions of the #IVm7b5 chord and Xo7 chords.

Hope that helps,

Guni

szulc
10-19-2002, 12:53 PM
I think it is interesting to note that these first few bars are all quartal triads from Dm pentatonic ( except the G).
It is my belief that this is no conincidence.
I think this same approach was used in "Fortress around my heart".

Zatz
10-19-2002, 10:01 PM
Guni,

Thanks for your time and advice. That's really helpful!

I've got another silly question.


4) can resolve to IV or IVm

Thousands of times I've come across IVm in progressions played over tunes in major. It was sometimes the ivb melody note that would be a good reason for flattening the 3rd in IV but in other cases I couldn't explain that for myself while it sounded great.

My versions are:

1. Maybe it's just some kind of deviation to IVm tonality to establish a temporary strong minor center?

2. Or is it just because using IIIb, VIb, VIIb brings the minor flavour? But I think it applies mostly to rock music with riffy power chord progressions.

What's so special about this IVm or am I just overobsessed with it? :)

Zatz.

Guni
10-24-2002, 06:07 PM
Hi Zatz,

Sorry for the delay....

Yeah, IVm is a very common technique for 'modal interchange', meaning borrowing chords from the relative minor of a key. The lowered sixth scale degree has been traditionally seen as the lowered third of the IV chord in major, making it a 'subdominant minor' chord.

Another chord having subdominant minor functionality is bVImaj7

What's so special about it? Well, it's another way of creating cadences with a different touch (Cmaj7 Fm7 Cmaj7 or Cmaj7 Abmaj7 Cmaj7). The b6 should be voicelead to the 5.

And yes, if you have b6 in the melody subdominant minor chords are for sure a good way of harmonizing it.

Guni

Zatz
10-25-2002, 03:22 PM
Thanks, Guni!

Ruled by this logic can I generalize this approach into substituting IIIbmaj7 for Im and VIIbmaj7 for Gm while borrowing chords from relative minor?

If so, I guess the voiceleading would be as follows:

1. biii -> iv or biii -> iii. As it's a kind of a tonic function I guess we have both opportunities here.

2. bvii -> vi (for ex.: VIIbmaj7 -> C6/9). bvii -> vii (in descending bass movement over dominant portion of progression - VIIbmaj7 -> V7 -> Imaj7)

Does this mental rambling make sense?

I'm sure there's more to it but that's what came first to my mind after I'd read your post.

Ultra mega best regards,
Zatz.

C13b9b11
10-28-2002, 11:22 PM
Just a brief note...the tab on this thread looks like the keyboard part, rather than the guitar part. It's really a performance issue, but the guitar plays a second "snap" (after the keys) on beat 4 of each measure. So, the keyboard plays a hit on the "and" of beat 2, and the guitar plays a very staccato hit on beat 4. Obviously, this is only pertinent if you are performing with a keyboard player, but if you are playing it with just guitars, you may want to soften the attack on the first hit, and then snap the top strings a la "chicken-picking" on the second one.