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View Full Version : How do you train your ear?



yaclaus
07-06-2004, 04:37 PM
Headline kinda says it all...

Personally I try to rip everything of I can from cd's(not that I'm doing great), try to sing what I play and the other way around. I also use the free ear training software from www.musictheory.net (http://www.musictheory.net)

Still it goes a bit slow, any of you who have any alternate ways to practice your ear?

thanks ahead

claus winther

theox
07-06-2004, 10:24 PM
The most common I think is learning to play songs or melodies by ear! Musictheory.net will help you on the way.

salsainglesa
07-07-2004, 05:15 PM
Solfege is a great way to train your ear. Every note in the major scale has its own 'feel', a direction it wants to take... for instance, the 7th when played is always leaning towards the tonic, aswell as the 5th of the scale.
When you get this feeling of tone, then you ave given a big step...
Another thing is good to focus on is to make rythm drills.
The whole idea, is that if you can actually think in terms of music in your head it will be much easier to recognize them...
If you had never seen the color blue, how would you know what it looks like?

Its a process of association. hope I helped :D

Malcolm
07-08-2004, 04:04 AM
I think it depends on what you want to do with your ear training. If you want to be able to identify the 3rd interval from F and know it's the third and not the forth, or in other words, think in intervals, then formal ear training is in order, however, if you want to pick out melodies then a less formal approach will get you there --- In my opinion -----

Scale work and knowing what is in scale and what is out by the sound of the note is helping me. I gave up on the formal ear training methods. Much too much for what I want. After spending some time with scales I'm able to chicken pick a melody using the scale pattern. Before I started using scales this was really hit and miss. The more I do it the better I'm getting... and I'm happy with this approach.

sugarbee
07-08-2004, 06:17 AM
Well, my response is coming from someone who doesn't do a lot of theory when it comes to music, so bear that in mind.
As far as my learning process has been concerned I rely heavily on my ear when it comes to learning to play something, how do I do this? Well, I get really obsessive when it comes to listening, in fact, I can't passively listen to anything, it's hard for anything to be backgroud music because I am constantly analysing it. I do it for fun, it's like a game for me, but it's really useful when used as a tool. You can try things like this; on any song you listen to, immeadiately try and figure out how many instruments are being used, single out each one and follow it, even if it's a really insignificant part that's low in the mix, start to listen to characteristics of emotion and figure out how they are accomplished. Is it effects? Dynamics? The actual composition of the piece itself? And analyse random sounds too, I harmonize to the beep a truck makes when backng up, the hum of my computer, anything that has a constant pitch/rhythm. It sounds silly, and how does it help you learn songs? well, indirectly it helps because you soon find you get a real feel for sound and how it works or doesn't work when you create or recreate it. For me it's about fine tuning details, filling out a chord that was almost but not quite right, making it as expressive as possible.

So there's the end of my long rant, don't know if it makes as much sense to read as it does in my head, but I tried! Good luck anyhow. :D