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Rizla
10-29-2004, 10:43 PM
I am having difficulty understanding the articles on ear training. Is there any kind of an exercise or what ever that I can do 30 minutes every day or something?

Zatz
10-29-2004, 11:23 PM
Hi Rizla!

I once told in some thread that, in my opinion, the best way to train your ear on every day basis is to be tuned to audible world around yourself. Try to repeat cars' meeps, sing along with vacuun cleaner (as Guni and myself usually do :D), etc.

Of course if you, lucky you, have a chance and time to find time to train your ear, it'll be good to try the software that we discussed earleir on our forums. EarMaster Pro is one of the bset, I think.

Zatz.

fortymile
10-30-2004, 04:41 AM
you can just kind of listen to all the intervals and then go through your day trying to call the ones you hear. and you can test yourself in that way.

a way to get into it at first is to maybe grab an ear-training book that comes with a CD. i drove to california from florida last year and whiled away long stretches of desert by listening to random tones going off. it was wild.

theox
11-01-2004, 04:54 PM
Combine ear training with instrument knowledge.

For example, listen to a CD and try to repeat the licks and melodies on your instrument. This is something you constantly will get better at.

Then there are programs like the free one found at www.musictheory.net that can be very helpful.

THERE IS NOTHING WORSE THAN A 'MUSICIAN' WITH A BAD EAR. I'd go as far as saying the first thing you should have in order to be called a musician is a good ear.

So go practicing! It's fun! Learn how to play your favourite melodies by ear (without notation/tab). You'll get a kick out of it, I'm sure!

fortymile
11-01-2004, 06:29 PM
what if you have an excellent ear but really clumsy hands? i can't figure out if i should even call myself a musician sometimes.

theox
11-01-2004, 08:55 PM
what if you have an excellent ear but really clumsy hands? i can't figure out if i should even call myself a musician sometimes.
That's way better than the other way around! Seriously! :p

At least for me it's way more pleasurable to listen to someone - anyone, even a complete beginner - who knows what he/she wants to hear. We all make mistakes, but not all of us play from the heart (= the 'mind->ear->hands' chain). Look at the chain. Ok if you're mind is not right (LOL) ie. you have dull ideas, that's not good. And if your ear doesn't know what's going on in the mind, how can the hands possibly execute the ideas? But if the ideas are fine and you know what the notes are (combined with instrument knowledge ie. you know where the notes are on the fretboard), then SO WHAT if the execution ain't perfect?? That's something you can practice on and improve. The same goes for the ear. A lot of people are just too lazy to bother. They'd rather do mindless technical exercises 10 hours a day. It's hard to be creative. That's where boys are separated from men.

IF YOU HAVE GOOD IDEAS AND THE PASSION TO MAKE THEM REAL, THE TECHNIQUE WILL FOLLOW NATURALLY, DON'T WORRY.

I personally think it's better to have your technique a little step behind your musicality. This way you won't 'overplay'.

Of course everything I say is arguable, but this is the way I feel at the moment.

fortymile
11-02-2004, 02:06 AM
ah that's good to hear. this takes me back to when i first started seriously getting into songwriting. im thankful grunge was all over the place then because it took the focus off of having to be perfect. that ethic probably spawned a lot players, some bad and some talented, but i think overall it's a good thing, because it gets right to the heart of expressiveness, which is the foundation of music. the whole 'if it sounds good, it is good' thing.

Los Boleros
11-02-2004, 02:35 PM
I am having difficulty understanding the articles on ear training. Is there any kind of an exercise or what ever that I can do 30 minutes every day or something?The best way I know to train the ear is to play Scales and patterns and sing them. There have been many examples of this on previous threads. Get to the point where you can sing a little melody then play it.

Another thing that I did as a kid is practiced to the radio instead of recorded music. It was always different stuff and I was always challenged to figure out the key and find little melodies.

Now here is a Big piece of advice:
When learning to songs, Spend more time learning what the singer is singing than what the guitar player is playing.

HughM
11-02-2004, 06:18 PM
Basic ear training - learning to recognise intervals - is an essential skill. You can and should do it with your instrument, but doing it out of a playing context - just listening - is invaluable.

There's a nice bit of freeware called Functional Ear Trainer that works really nicely. Basically, it'll play you a cadence of chords ( I-IV-V-I for example) and then ask you to identify a single interval note. You can chose the chord style (major, minor, etc.) and the interval(s) you want to test yourself on. I can't say offhand where to get it, but if you google "Functional Ear Trainer" you're sure to find it.

Rizla
11-02-2004, 10:37 PM
That is all great, thanks for the advice.

russcycles
12-01-2004, 11:14 PM
Thanks HughM for the software suggestion for Functional Ear Trainer. This could be very interesting.

ViolinMaster
12-17-2004, 03:43 AM
Combine ear training with instrument knowledge.

For example, listen to a CD and try to repeat the licks and melodies on your instrument. This is something you constantly will get better at.

Then there are programs like the free one found at www.musictheory.net (http://www.musictheory.net/) that can be very helpful.

THERE IS NOTHING WORSE THAN A 'MUSICIAN' WITH A BAD EAR. I'd go as far as saying the first thing you should have in order to be called a musician is a good ear.

So go practicing! It's fun! Learn how to play your favourite melodies by ear (without notation/tab). You'll get a kick out of it, I'm sure!
This is the method I use constantly. I play violin, and im always listening to Loreena Mckennit or something fun like that. I hear the song, and as it plays I decipher the notes on my instrument. After 2 or 3 times, I'm able to play along with the song on the cd. It works a ton for me, I never found those cd's easy to follow. I prefer my own unorthodox methods. :D

Los Boleros
12-17-2004, 04:50 AM
Hello Melissa,

Welcome to the forum;)

So you are a violinist hey? What music are you into? Do you have some mp3s that you have recorded?

rmuscat
12-17-2004, 08:28 AM
omg!
A violinist!!!

more instruments! Yes! We're always happy to have new musicians around!

hi melissa!!! i suggest you start a thread in the "New Members zone" with some stuff about your musical tastes and abilities (ex that you're a violinist!) ... and also so you get the ibreathe welcome!

i'll start by welcoming you myself too


I am having difficulty understanding the articles on ear training. Is there any kind of an exercise or what ever that I can do 30 minutes every day or something?

hey rizla sorry for not answering your post and hijacking it. I'd follow Zatz tip. Tune to anything. Last time i was at the airport fire alarm went on (routine checks) I sang to it, then i started to harmonize it 3rd and 5ths ... was fun. I could only do it because i have been singing the major scale for the past month for 30m a day. Major scale and the chromatic scale for now.

Hope that helps

Santuzzo
12-17-2004, 09:15 AM
I just found this link / these links,

haven't really checked out any of them yet, but maybe there is some useful stuff .....

So, check it out,
here it is : http://www.intimateaudio.com/links.earballz.html


let me know if any of this helped ....

Good Luck!

Lars

ViolinMaster
12-18-2004, 05:38 AM
hahaha! I didn't know I would be so welcome here! I know how to work forums, I join everything :D . I love Classical music mostly, but I don't have any MP3 recordings. I'm currently trying to set up a quartet or something of the sort, but not very much luck.

fortymile
12-18-2004, 06:01 AM
hi :cool:

Rizla
12-19-2004, 12:53 AM
I've been listening to vocals and working them out on the guitar like Los Bol said, this helps a lot.

Hugowin
02-20-2005, 10:05 AM
My friend who also plays the violin must have an amazing ear cause' he can play almost any song just by listening to it and he can play along with it. I just couldn't belive it because he hasn't been playing for a long time. SO JELOUS! I mean he could play along to very complex stuff that I couldn't even imagine I could transcribe by ear :S

I'm also trying to get my ear training together and I have started to sing whatever I play! :P And I can basicly sing any note and copy it on the guitar but when I sing melodies I most likely mess up :S

Btw is it good to sing instrumental songs? haha does it actually help?

I can sing alot of Steve Vai's tender surrender!:D

Dommy
02-20-2005, 06:08 PM
I was chillin' with a bud of mine, and he was playing around with my cellphone and found the Can-Can ring. He asked me to figure out how to play it on my guitar just for kicks, and after a couple of listens I got down the melody by ear.

If you just go and sit infront of the tv and try toi play some of the jingles or lead lines you hear in any song, thats ear training...they are usually pretty easy melodies and aren't too fast.

I'm not suggesting doing this all the time, you should do regular transcribing too, either to your instrument or onto manuscript paper. You could also try singing the solos before you learn it on your instrument, it may lend itself to insights on how to finger or phrase a certain line. Singing the solo accurately forces you to internalize the material.

If you can't sing the stuff you play(play the stuff you sing)...do you really know it?

Pekkaman
02-20-2005, 07:39 PM
So... what if you can't sing?
Cause I really can't get my troath to make a sound that's clean. Will it be impossible for me to train my ear? I sure hope not.

ViolinMaster
02-20-2005, 08:02 PM
Singing won't cause you to not be able to eartrain. If I hear a melody or something I like, I pull out my instrument and I find the note it starts on. I listen to it over and over again and in a minute or 2 I get it figure out. It helps a lot, since I like to fiddle and some of that music is hard to read, but its so much easier if I hear it. I have half of Loreena Mckennits shnazzy irish riffs memorized :D . Just keep practicing, it becomes easier after a while.

satch_master
02-21-2005, 04:00 AM
year try signing out malmsteen solos, haha that would be funny, especially on the sweeping parts. lol. violin? from what i believed i though this was a forum for guitarists not violinists. or do you play guitar aswell?

Bizarro
02-21-2005, 04:42 AM
It's a music forum, not just for guitarists.

iBreatheMusic.com exists for established and aspiring musicians who want honest, quality instruction and a casual point of contact where they can interact and develop their skills with like minded people.

It's aim is to challenge/stretch the borders for learning music over the internet by actively developing online applications and tools.

salsainglesa
02-21-2005, 05:20 AM
and we would love to have piano teachers :D

Factor
02-23-2005, 11:59 AM
So... what if you can't sing?
Cause I really can't get my troath to make a sound that's clean. Will it be impossible for me to train my ear? I sure hope not. I believe that everybody (except those born tonedeaf) can sing a note in the correct pitch. A great voice is "in tune" as well as it is pleasing to the ear. You can sing the correct pitch even though it doesn't sound nice.

I was very conscious of my voice when I started singing along in unison with my instrument. The more you do it, the more you feel confident, and the better you get at it. I'm well aware that my voice isn't very nice, but I feel I can hit the pitches at least. There's a notable difference.

EDIT:
I use EarMaster regularily (sp?), and try to grab melodies here and there. A good tip, Sing a little phrase, and nail it on the guitar as quick as possible. Even better, do this in a jam session with yer bandmates: Play phrases back and forth. Makes you concentrate on your ear, rhythm, communication and getting the sounds you hear down on the guitar.