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Schooligo
12-11-2002, 10:21 AM
I have a followup question-based on a discussion I had about a (then unknown software to me) called PowerTab. Eric was very helpful!
To quote Eric:"Regarding importing the TABs at ibreathe. This is not possible as of yet, but maybe we could include downloadable ptb.-Files in our future articles... ( Guni ? What do ya think ? ) That way, people could, if they want to, download the ptb and listen to the exercises used in the article"

It's the last sentence that describes minutely a very important learning tool for many musicians: Namely the ability to take an exercise, song, etc. & in practical application Sightread the Rhythm based on specifically standard notation, then play & hear this exercise, song, etc. Not only at one specific tempo but that the Practicing musician has the ability to adjust this Tempo based on his/her level of ability.

Q1: Is Eric's quote a possibility, & how much logistical trouble(Time, "blood, sweat, & tears") would this entail?

Q2: If not PowerTab is some other strategy a possibility!

Q3: Any Musical Instructional Websites that you would recommend that use this technology? (I'm aware of Riffinteractive software, are there any others you would recommend, that the Practicing Musician can use to adjust the Tempo based on his/her level of ability, that use standard notation for Sightreading & counting logistics?)

Q4: Based on recommendations at this site I have tried to learn the drum rudiments but I can't understand(Read & "especially HEAR")the drum notation, it is different than standard notation, any advice?

Q5: Rhythmic figures-I have studied rhythm but some Rhythmic figures still elude me based on the fact I don't read them as often as 8th's, 16th notes, etc.
This is a personal weakness that I am trying to improve:
namely the ability to Sightread a piece of sheet music, & if it has a figure like a quarter note triplet, multiple sextuplets, etc. I don't have the experience or the resources at present to be able to sightread the figure, at the same time "in my mind HEAR the figure" & then play the figure. Especially hear the figure since I can then practice it minutely!


Q6: Any advice on how to "Learn how to play with a click...and with that, what it means to rush, push, drag, pull back, play on top of the beat, etc."
I practice w/ a metronome frequently & I pretty much play "in the pocket" when playing w/ a metronome.
I generally play w/ the metronome either on beats 2 & 4 so it swings like a drummer (playing a High Hat) or on beats 1 & 3 more structured sounding or classical.
But I would like to be able to more expressively play "behind the beat, ahead of the beat, etc.


Once again thanks! Any advice is greatly appreciated!

EricV
12-11-2002, 12:50 PM
Hi there,

regarding the ptb-files... I can only speak for myself, but since I create all the TABs for the articles with Powertab anyway, it wouldnīt be too much work to attach the ptb.-file to the article once itīs done... so in the future, new articles by me will feature the downloadable ptb-file.

I also will look into recording some of the licks myself, but since my computer system ainīt running that stable ( crashing a lot ), I nver got around to record stuff yet. Weīll see...

Warm regards
Eric

RobA
12-11-2002, 08:22 PM
It would be great if the tabs could also be offered in another format other than powertab. To my knowledge powertab is only avaible for windows. It would be leaving people like me out (I use a Mac). Well, whatever can be done

Schooligo
12-11-2002, 08:39 PM
"so in the future, new articles by me will feature the downloadable ptb-file."

Thank you Eric, that will be very helpful!
sorry about the computer issue,
I always appreciate that fact that you make the effort to respond to my questions, I hope others will respond as well!

I really respect the advice given by members of this forum!!

If anyone has any insight into my questions (as there is 6 individual questions) please respond, these questions & their possible Solutions ideally will benefit everyone!!!!

Once again thanks for the dialogue.

EricV
12-11-2002, 09:09 PM
Originally posted by RobA
It would be great if the tabs could also be offered in another format other than powertab. To my knowledge powertab is only avaible for windows. It would be leaving people like me out (I use a Mac). Well, whatever can be done

Hmmm... the only thing that comes to mind is add a MIDI file of the licks, and everyone who doesnīt have Powertab ( or canīt use it -> Mac ) can import this in any MIDI- editor of choice and alter the tempo...
So you could look at the TAB ( jpegs ) in the article and play along to the MIDI...
Thatīs what comes to mind as a solution. I prefer Powertab, like it way more than Guitar Pro ( no notation in that one ), so if the solution described above would help...
Eric

Schooligo
12-12-2002, 12:41 PM
Jeez, I really thought I'd get quite a bit more feedback regarding this thread & these questions.
To give credit where credit is due The PowerTab question has been answered quite specifically(I was just curious of the status as a followup, Eric once again was very helpful on this question).

However the other questions remain unanswered.

I know members of this forum know alot more about some of these questions than I do. I was hoping to hear all thoughts, recommendations, & expertise.

According to the stats quite a few people have read this thread, yet only a few have replied. What should I attribute this to?

I know for "Studio Musicians" the ability to sightread rhythms,
"Hear" the rhythm in their mind & then communicate that to the muscles so you can then play those rhythms is a necessity. The skill of being able to have a library or repertoire of these rhythms & Rhythmic figures to use for practice, composition, & improvisation seems pretty important also, as well as the masterful ability to play just "behind the beat, ahead of the beat, Etc. Am I placing too much importance on mastering this? (Given the benefit of the doubt that I have a good applicable knowledge of Musical Theory, Technique, Education-as I strive to be a student as well as teacher, & a creative musician!)

Guni
12-12-2002, 05:06 PM
Originally posted by Schooligo
Am I placing too much importance on mastering this? Not at all!!! Rhythm is one of the most important skill a musician has to have - without getting this right it won't sound well. It not necessarily requires good sightreading skills - it's more about rhythmic feel and 'knowing' rhythmic variations. I am a very rhythmic person myself. As with everything else there are areas in music which come easy for some people - others have to work real hard to advance.

Nevertheless, I worked my *** off focusing on rhythm and rhythmic patterns ....... :D


Q5: Rhythmic figures-I have studied rhythm but some Rhythmic figures still elude me based on the fact I don't read them as often as 8th's, 16th notes, etc. This is actually what I was aiming at in the article 'Develop your rhythmic feel'. Although, I only scratched the surface this is where future articles will dive in....

here's what I practiced a lot:
take 16th notes for example: write out all combinations possible:

group of 4: 1 e a e
group of 3: 1 e a, 1 a e, 1 e e, e a e
group of 2: 1 a (8th notes), 1 e, e a, etc etc ...
group of 1: 1, e, a, e

Now, focus on just one combination: say 1 e e.

clap it, improvise with just this figure for 5 minutes, add different accents, pick a chord and play funk guitar with this rhythm, sing it together with the radio while driving, etc etc etc .... After a few days this rhythmic combination will be part of your vocabulary. use it, play with it, .......

You can do this with any rhythmic values out there. Say quarter note triplets. Thing is that this is a polyrhythm figure. It's 3 against 4, whereby a hit appears on every dotted 8th note. But you can apply the same procedure from above to this figure. If you really dig into it you'll get to grips with it soon.


Q6: Any advice on how to "Learn how to play with a click...and with that, what it means to rush, push, drag, pull back, play on top of the beat, etc."
For a start I'd say put the metronome on 60 (quarter notes). Mute your strings so you can just hear a 'plop'. Now try to play quarter notes in sync with the metronome. Record this and listen to it. Most people tend to rush, ie they play before the beat. How about you?

Focus on playing on top of the beat ... then slightly start to push and play up front .... come back again to playing on top .... relax, pull back and play behind the beat. Again, record and listen to the result.

Hope that helps

Guni

Schooligo
12-12-2002, 11:21 PM
Thanks for the reply Eric, RobA, & Guni:
This is exactly the type of advice I had hoped to recieve when starting this thread!
Once again thanks for making an effort to reply.
I hope others will add to this thread (in the future as well).

szulc
12-13-2002, 02:39 AM
Count 123456,
with your left hand beat the 1 and the 4,
with your right hand 1,3,5.
This is 2 over 3.
Now count 1- 12.
With your left hand 1 5 9
With your right hand 1 4 7 10
this is 3 over 4.

szulc
12-14-2002, 11:23 PM
Don't forget to switch hands in the last exercise.
I also suggest trying RH R Foot and LH LFoot , RH LF and LH RF.
Try to count out loud while you do this.