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shredder123569
01-09-2005, 03:32 AM
Those of you out their that can name all the intervals all most 100 perfect of the time how long did it take you to go from not being able to name any intervals to them all. When i say them all i mean form a m2 to and octove.

curiousgeorge
01-09-2005, 03:46 AM
Intervals aren't as hard to memorize as you think! Since the interval shapes repeat all over the neck, it's not really too hard. Try improvising with two strings using only major and minor thirds one day and harmonize scales as well. Another day improvise in 4ths and 5ths harmonizing major minor, pentatonic scales etc... Etc etc until you've covered the bases. This will help you internalize the sound and shape of the intervals, then you will be able to improvise better.

Gizmo
01-09-2005, 07:11 AM
The names of intervals aren't too complicated, but it might be tricky applying them at first. Start by thinking of a diatonic (7-note) scale. The scale will have a 1st (root), 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th. After the 7th comes the octave, which is just the root one register higher.
Basically, all we're going to think about right now are how the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th relate to the root. There are different types of these intervals, as you seem to know since you mentioned m2, a minor 2nd.
In most cases, the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th will be referred to as either major or minor, and the 4th and 5th will be perfect, diminished (flatted), or augmented (sharp).
Now think of how far each interval is from the root note. Look at a C Major scale: C D E F G A B (C). C is the root, D is the 2nd, E is the 3rd, and so on. In the Major scale, the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th are majors and the 4th and 5th are perfects. Now, say we were to change the B to a Bb. Instead of being a major 7th, it would be a minor 7th. Change the F to an F# to go from a perfect 4th to an augmented 4th. Change the G to a Gb to go from a perfect 5th to a diminished 5th.
Note that the F# and Gb are the same note, but look at these two examples:
C D E F# G A B
C D E F Gb A B
One example has an augmented (or sharp) 4th, and the other has a diminished (or flatted) fifth. The same note, yes, but their contexts will give the two above scales different qualities.
Now, the terms augmented and diminished can also apply to the other intervals. The difference between a major and minor 2nd, 3rd, 6th, or 7th is just a half-step. With C as the root, E is the major third, and Eb is the minor 3rd. However, take it further down from the minor 3rd to Ebb (E double-flat, same note as D) and it's a diminished 3rd. Take it further up from the major 3rd to an E# (same note as F) and it's an augmented 3rd. If you use these, you're getting into fairly exotic scales or modes.
It helps if you can think of popular examples of intervals to get an idea of what they sound like. The 3-note NBC theme (ding DING diiing) includes a major 6th. The Jaws theme is well-known for a minor 2nd. The perfect 5th, along with the root, forms a basic power chord. The first measure of the popular intro riff of Crazy Train has Randy Rhoads using the root, perfect 5th, and minor 6th.
Above, curiousgeorge mentioned interval shapes; I often think of the shape my fingers move into when visualising intervals. With the exception of the jump from the G to the B string, these work on any pair of strings. A minor 3rd is one string higher and two frets back (towards the headstock). One string higher and one fret back is a major 3rd. The parallel fret has a perfect 4th. Next comes the augmented 4th or diminished 5th. One string higher and two frets over (towards the bridge) is the perfect 5th. You can also think of how to play these intervals on the same string; the minor 2nd is one fret over, the major 2nd is two frets over, then come the minor 3rd, major 3rd, perfect 4th, augmented 4th/diminished 5th, perfect 5th, minor 6th, major 6th, minor 7th, major 7th, and the octave.
Actually, that last bit of info is probably good enough to start with; if there's too much info for right now, then take it one bit at a time, and continue to ask for help if you need it.

curiousgeorge
01-09-2005, 04:14 PM
Also, if you get a scale diagram that shows the intervals in a scale along the fretboard, memorize their locations from the root notes. They will be the same distance from the root when transposed to other keys.

Factor
01-09-2005, 04:32 PM
I think shredder123569 wanted to know how one recognizes them by ear. This takes time, and is not done overnight. I can't really give you a timeline for learning this, because it depends on a lot of factors such as how much you practice, how well you practice and so on.

My advice, get an ear training program. I own Ear Trainer, and once in a while (far too rarely) I sit down for half an hour or more and practice recognizing intervals, chords, invertions of chords and so on. Really good stuff.

Practicing your ear on your own is difficult. But you can train your ear by picking melodies and transferring them to the guitar. Start out with some easy melodies like childhood songs and such and progress your way upwards.

Good luck

shredder123569
01-15-2005, 02:51 AM
Ya you are right i'm talking about by ear . i'm starting to think that i have ear damage or something because is not getting any better and i've been working hard on it for 3 months.

AyKay
01-15-2005, 03:52 AM
www.musictheory.net has a really good ear trainer. Try things like these :

Maj 6 - n B (c) theme
maj third - first diad in rugrats theme
min third - second diad in rugrats
m2 - jaws, etc.
perfect 5th - twinkle twinkle little star
perfect 4th - here comes the bride
Major 7th - soooooome.....WHERE (octave).....O(maj7, or m2 going down).ver the rainbow....

Factor
01-16-2005, 11:47 PM
Ya you are right i'm talking about by ear . i'm starting to think that i have ear damage or something because is not getting any better and i've been working hard on it for 3 months.

How have you been practicing?

shredder123569
01-17-2005, 01:17 AM
David Lucas Burge ear training relative pitch course

wonderdog
01-17-2005, 02:26 AM
Major 7th -- opening notes of Star Trek theme (the original one, that is....)

ashc
01-17-2005, 09:31 AM
Star Trek is a minor 7th isnt it?

For Maj 7th I also use the "Somewhere over" thing and after a few times blank out the octave on "where"

mac220
03-31-2005, 01:52 PM
When Learning the intervals you have to be able to hear the interval in your head before you check yourself. Like this

1. Choose an interval 5th decending, then choose a starting note
2. play the starting note, in your head head the second note of the interval
3. Check against an instrument.

It take time, i would say about a couple of weeks to a month to really have the interval so you can recall it internally from any random note.

the most important thing is to get the internal memory of the interval so you can hear it in your head, being able to recognise it is level 1, level 2 is the memory, from my experience you can spend a lot of time recognising notes but never really get the internal memory of it. I would suggest practicing vocal and only using the instrument to check your accuracy. For an excellent book on ear training check out

Thom Mason - Art of Hearing: Aural Skills for Improvisers

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0793579406/qid=1112272622/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-2171993-8748942?v=glance&s=books

I have his previous book which is now ot of print, i'm sure the new version will be as good if not better.

when deciding which melodies to use to learn the intervals try to use ones which you have known from a very young age, they will be more ingrained into your memory, hense why some of mine are from hymns i learnt a school or old songs

Accending

minor 2nd - I'll remember April (Jazz Standard)
2nd - Happy Birthday
m3 - whole lotta love (Led Zepplin) Corcovado (Jazz Standard)
Major 3rd - While shephers watch there flocks by night(hymn)
4th - Auld Langs Syne
#4/b5 - Maria, from west side story, the simpsons opening interval of the main theme
5 - twinkle twinkle little star
#5 - West side story theme, i think
6 - My bony lies over the ocean
b7 - Star Trek theme tune
Major 7th - Superman, not sure which but root - root - major 7th - 5th bit
Octave - Somewhere over the rainbow

Descending

m2nd - stella by star light (Jazz Standard)
2nd - three blind mice, Lonney's Lament (Jazz Standard)
m3rd - Olea (Jazz Standard), Whole lotta love 2nd, 3rd notes
Major 3rd - Clock chimes
4th - Bach piece, All of me (Jazz Standard)
#4/b5th - Same a accending as the interval is the same both accending and descending
5th - Flintstones
#5th - Bass line i knew, it just stuck, Love Story (Jazz Standard)
6th - Take the a Train (Jazz Standard)
b7th - Watemelon Man (Jazz Standard), chelsea Bridge (Jazz Standard)
Octave - I don't have one i just knew it

this is just stage one, the next stage is to learn to recognise a melody start with 3 notes, then work up to 5, 7, 9 etc. You should aim to recognise:
i) the interval against the root note
ii) the interval against the previous note

Regards,

Mark

ashc
03-31-2005, 01:57 PM
Thanks a bunch for posting a descending list. I have my own ascending list for the diatonic intervals and it massively helps when I hear the interval to have these associations. I started on descending intervals (now I'm pretty good on the ascending) and I've been struggling on finding cues.

EDIT: :D I should have looked closer as I don't actually know any of these standards... :D

mac220
03-31-2005, 02:07 PM
If you can try to make you own list, the list i posted is songs which i knew and the melody had ingrained itself into my head over the years. If you find you own songs for as many as you can you will descrease the learning time significantly as you have cut out actually have to really learn the notes.

When you are leaning the intervals do the following

1. Choose an interval you know you are weakest on ( i always work on limiting factors what is stopping me the most from making progress)
2. Starting on C play the first note
3. try and hear the interval in your head, sometimes it will take up to a couple of minutes, stick with it. Every time you have to search for it when its difficult you are creating new pathways in your brain for that interval. Keep trying until you can hear it
4. Check the interval on the instrument
5. Sing a perfect 4th against the C, so C - F (following the cycle of fourths)
6. F is now the root note, repeat the process for the same interval against the new root note
7. repeat arround the whole cycle of 4ths, then repeat for the cycle of 5ths
8. repeat for cycle of 4ths but each time you change note use a descending 4th, and the same for the cycle of 5ths.

the great thing about this is you don't need an instrument, you can do this while walking down the street, in traffic, listening to your girl friend tell you about her day(remember not to sing out loud for this one, she will love it because you look as though you're really concentrating on what she's saying:D )

Regards,

Mark

ashc
03-31-2005, 02:10 PM
Thanks. As you can see in my edit above I will need to make my own list :D
For the ascending ones my list has evolved to about 1/2 mine, 1/2 I picked up from books and so on.

mac220
03-31-2005, 02:19 PM
If you are still stuck i could always put the melodies into mp3 files, some of the intervals are hard to find songs for.

ashc
03-31-2005, 02:27 PM
No worries, I could, and should, do that myself - I'll stop being lazy and try and hunt down some melodies I know with the appropriate intervals. I think 1/2 hour looking at the vocal staff in my Beatles Complete would give me most of what I need. Great tip!

I use the ear trainer at www.good-ear.com for 5 or 10 minutes on my lunch break for the actual training.

Flextones
11-30-2007, 09:05 PM
It has taken me all of my adult life to master singing intervals in any direction. I can sight sing pretty well now. Music training for church choirs and people in church was different before 1960.. You had to know fasolatido sacred harp, shaped note harmony. Those people sang without accompaniment. They had crystal ears. The knew solgeggio, fixed and moveable do and numbers. There are many methods including using the alphabets if you want to. Find a system that works for you. I know them all and mix or match them as the spirit moves me. You don't need to spend a lot of money on books either. You kneed to learn this stuff patiently. It does not come over night. I thank God I finally got myself together. When you get yourself together. The SUN will come up and stay up!!! I guarantee it.

Reign of Praine
12-18-2007, 10:56 PM
Those of you out their that can name all the intervals all most 100 perfect of the time how long did it take you to go from not being able to name any intervals to them all. When i say them all i mean form a m2 to and octove.

It only took me a few months. All you have to remember is the order of notes, and a few rules.

1. When you raise a Perfect or Major interval by one semitone, it becomes an augmented interval.

2. When you lower a Perfect or Minor interval by one semitone, it becomes diminished.

Oh and you should know the basic intervals but that doesn't take long to learn.

joeyd929
12-19-2007, 04:49 PM
Those of you out their that can name all the intervals all most 100 perfect of the time how long did it take you to go from not being able to name any intervals to them all. When i say them all i mean form a m2 to and octove.

Are you saying to name them when you hear them, or just memorizing them in general?

Flextones
12-19-2007, 07:42 PM
I can't name all of the intervals by sound yet. I mean all the intervals up and down up to the 13th which covers compound intervals as it includes intervals up to the octave as well.

I have been trying to do this since 1974 when I earned my Bachelor of Science in Music from Indiana University. I know the theory backwards and forewards, but my ear just sucks.

I have inconsistencies in my perception that I can't resolve.

I pray if there is anyone out there who has a better way to do this , I AM ALL EARS!!!!!

Flextones

joeyd929
12-19-2007, 08:59 PM
I can't name all of the intervals by sound yet. I mean all the intervals up and down up to the 13th which covers compound intervals as it includes intervals up to the octave as well.

I have been trying to do this since 1974 when I earned my Bachelor of Science in Music from Indiana University. I know the theory backwards and forewards, but my ear just sucks.

I have inconsistencies in my perception that I can't resolve.

I pray if there is anyone out there who has a better way to do this , I AM ALL EARS!!!!!

Flextones

here is an excellent free site for ear training.. www.teoria.com

Nick89
01-22-2008, 02:36 PM
If this may help, that's the main site I use to practise intervals:
http://www.iwasdoingallright.com/tools/v2_22/ear_training.aspx. A great tool, the best of all available in the net, IMO.

Flextones
01-22-2008, 05:53 PM
I thank both Joeyd929 and Nick89 for their help. Both of you offered help that is greatly appreciated.

My recognition of intervals, melodically and harmonically has improved tremendously. I still have trouble retaining the sounds and recalling them when it is time for me to recall them after a peiod of a week or more. But I will continue to work at it. I have to get better now that this is the only job that I have now.

leegordo
01-27-2008, 01:33 PM
I think shredder123569 wanted to know how one recognizes them by ear. This takes time, and is not done overnight. I can't really give you a timeline for learning this, because it depends on a lot of factors such as how much you practice, how well you practice and so on.

My advice, get an ear training program. I own Ear Trainer, and once in a while (far too rarely) I sit down for half an hour or more and practice recognizing intervals, chords, invertions of chords and so on. Really good stuff.

Practicing your ear on your own is difficult. But you can train your ear by picking melodies and transferring them to the guitar. Start out with some easy melodies like childhood songs and such and progress your way upwards.

Good luck
Hi Factor, leegordo here, Exactly correct reply to Shreddar123569 re' intervals I would ask Shreddar why he wants to learn to recognize intervals by ear, better to learn chords from a playing point of view!!!

bresh
01-27-2008, 04:47 PM
Tried this tool, very easy, put MP3 on my Ipod and play shuffle, the answer is at the end of the file. Chords and Intervals.
www.eartrainingsolutions.com

Elcon
02-11-2008, 04:21 PM
Hi,

Today I read another comment about ear training. This is what this guy says in regard to knowing your intervals and chords:

"music and the way humans experience and organize pitches isn't really
intervallic. The human ear has a natural tendency to organize pitches
around key centers. In other words, pitches will be heard contextually
as relating to whatever key center/tonality your ear happens to be
oriented to at that moment."

"Basically, to have the 'whole' picture (just speaking in terms of RP)
while listening to music, it's important to be able to relate pitches
note to key as opposed to note to note. "

What is your comment on this?

Do you think in constant intervals when listening or playing your instrument or by any other means?

I hope you can help me out some more; give your opinion, idea's perhaps, exercises.

Thanks in advance!

Elcon

ragasaraswati
02-11-2008, 10:33 PM
-Play an open string.
-Hit a random note without looking (watch out the fret wires).
-Call the interval.
-Check if you where right.

When you perfect this move on hitting movable random notes with out open strings.

borge
02-12-2008, 10:15 PM
Hi Factor, leegordo here, Exactly correct reply to Shreddar123569 re' intervals I would ask Shreddar why he wants to learn to recognize intervals by ear, better to learn chords from a playing point of view!!!
if you cant identify intervals by themselves how can you expect to identify multiple intervals simultaneously (a chord)?