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wiechfreak
04-01-2005, 07:14 PM
Basically my practice schedual is 1/3 of my time on sight reading 1/3 on chops and 1/3 on ear work. Now for the ear practice what do you guys think would be more beneficial, just improvising by ear the entire time, or half the time on figuring out other songs by ear and half on improv. Do you guys have better methods of working on your ear? My main goal is to be able to improvise totally by ear without using scales or anything, because when i do I just end up using the same licks over and over

rmuscat
04-01-2005, 07:18 PM
my little tips. Play the scales and sing to them.

I personally started with the Major and Chromatic.

Between each note of the scale sing/play the root note.

So

C C C D C E C F C G C A C B

or

A A# A B A C A C#

that will start drilling intervals in you brain.

hope that helps! there's a lot more of course just a little thing to start off.

Mateo150
04-01-2005, 07:24 PM
don't "improvise by ear"... I'm guessing, but you probably tend to come up with similar stuff a lot, often sounding like the stuff already in your repertoire. Just a guess....it happens to me.... some suggestions: Solfege, the "dumb tune game" in the artilcles section, transcribe, do some of "hear a melody in your head and try to play it", maybe a midi ear trainer program (check out the GNU, and Functional ear trainer advanced - both free, covers a lot of bases), and whatever else you want. I personally like to transcribe, does more than just ear training, also build repertoire.

wiechfreak
04-01-2005, 08:41 PM
don't "improvise by ear"...

Why not? When I look at all my favorite guitar solos they dont really follow any type of scale or theory. I know I know, theres so muc htheory out there that there probably is actualyl some theory to the solos. But most of the best guitarists do it all by ear. Well at least my favorites...

Mateo150
04-01-2005, 08:49 PM
well... of course you improvise by ear. But its not ear training, read the dumb tune game article, what he says happens when most people say "they play by ear" is very true.

wiechfreak
04-01-2005, 09:05 PM
well... of course you improvise by ear. But its not ear training, read the dumb tune game article, what he says happens when most people say "they play by ear" is very true.
Hmm ill have to try this dumb tune game for sure. My only question would be, how much time should I spend on stuff like this compared to improv? Basically my entire goal with the ear training is so that I can improvise better rather than, as it says in that article, use the same licks over and over.

wiechfreak
04-01-2005, 09:10 PM
also do u guys feel that its worth the time to figure out solos and such by other guitarists by ear? Im really at quite a loss as to how to become good at improv,,,

Factor
04-01-2005, 09:23 PM
Yes I feel that this is good for your ear training. Transcribing and figuring out things by ear is an important skill and a good method for training your relative pitch.

But don't limit yourself to other guitarists (if you are like me, they play to fast or complicated to grab that by ear). Go after vocal lines like Los Boleros has suggested a couple of times, or even trumpet or stuff like that. Even catchy basslines are worth figuring out.

wiechfreak
04-01-2005, 10:46 PM
Yes I feel that this is good for your ear training. Transcribing and figuring out things by ear is an important skill and a good method for training your relative pitch.

But don't limit yourself to other guitarists (if you are like me, they play to fast or complicated to grab that by ear). Go after vocal lines like Los Boleros has suggested a couple of times, or even trumpet or stuff like that. Even catchy basslines are worth figuring out.
alright. Im just tryin to figure out how I should put al lthis into my practice schedual. Im thinking maybe spend half the time on improv and half on figuring out songs by ear.

What im curious about though is how do guys like clapton, page and other great improvisers do it. I wonder if the yare playing all by ear or what...

Factor
04-01-2005, 10:51 PM
Listen to a lot of music and try to sing along, to the bassline, the vocal melody, guitar, trupmet, bassline or what ever. I would always try to sing the stuff you are trying to transcribe. And don't go transcribing entire songs unless you want to. Pick out a lick or something that makes you go WOW! in the middle of a solo or something. That's what I do, I'm not that methodical when it comes to transcribing or stuff like that :/

I think that all the greats are thinking of melodies in their head, and then proceed to play them on the instrument. When I improvise it's often more of a "playing something on the guitar, then figuring out what it sounded like" which is a bit backwards unfortunately. This is something I'm working on though.

wiechfreak
04-01-2005, 10:56 PM
Listen to a lot of music and try to sing along, to the bassline, the vocal melody, guitar, trupmet, bassline or what ever. I would always try to sing the stuff you are trying to transcribe. And don't go transcribing entire songs unless you want to. Pick out a lick or something that makes you go WOW! in the middle of a solo or something. That's what I do, I'm not that methodical when it comes to transcribing or stuff like that :/

I think that all the greats are thinking of melodies in their head, and then proceed to play them on the instrument. When I improvise it's often more of a "playing something on the guitar, then figuring out what it sounded like" which is a bit backwards unfortunately. This is something I'm working on though.

Yea I hope to eventually develop very good relative pitch

Factor
04-01-2005, 10:59 PM
I would advise that you think of it as an continual process. I don't think it's like - "BOOM, you now have a certified relative pitch". I mean you get better every day! Step by step... that makes it a smaller task IMHO.

wiechfreak
04-01-2005, 11:53 PM
I would advise that you think of it as an continual process. I don't think it's like - "BOOM, you now have a certified relative pitch". I mean you get better every day! Step by step... that makes it a smaller task IMHO.

of course i dont expect that. Im just really looking into this so I know how I can best spend my time to get it.

wiechfreak
04-02-2005, 10:07 PM
So I guess I'll just spend half of my ear practice time on figuring out parts of songs by ear, and half on improv by ear. Thanks for anyone who helped

spookywooky
04-11-2005, 05:29 AM
Just wanted to pass on an exercise i got from Brett Garsed's new dvd, 'Rock Guitar Improvisation' (http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/173), regarding ear training. Brett (who learnt almost entirely by ear) plays a note on his low E string, then, without looking, randomly selects and plays a note somewhere else on the fretboard and states the interval between the two notes. A good exercise, made much easier if you have a friend to play the intervals for you.

Might be worth working into your practice time.