PDA

View Full Version : Recommendations for using a Metronome!



Schooligo
01-07-2003, 09:27 AM
Was reading the Thread Steve Vai-Hand on Heart & the subject of using a metronome cont. to occur in the thread.

Eric V quoted this:
John Petrucci is "one of very few guys who actually shows how to use a metronome to speed up a lick... that was great ! )"

since this thread has brought up the subject of how J.P. uses a Metronome, (I very much respect John Petrucci's advice, & I'm sure his advice will be helpful to countless others who read this thread):

A. How does J.P use a metronome & what are his Recommendations?



B. Also how do you guys recommend using a Metronome?




:) I personally have been using a Metronome for the past 4 years, & I have greatly advanced my Musicianship, Technique, Improvisation, & Rhythm from:

1. Playing to a Metronome on Beats 2 & 4(&/or when playing Classical Gtr or Latin on Beats 1 & 3)

2. Recording my individual practices


Thanks in advance for the reply, Any & all Advice will be helpful!

EricV
01-07-2003, 02:50 PM
What I was referring to was basically that John actually showed how to use a metronome in his video, which is rather unusual.
Because many of those videos are like "HEre are my 15 most mind-boggling licks", and no one mentions how to really come up with new licks, or how to practise them in an effecient way.

John, in his video, had a click running for most of the licks ( which isnīt being done in many instructional vids either ), and shows a neat exercise:
Take a simple, ascending A major scale. Set your metronome to a certain tempo. Play through that scale using whole notes. Then, half and quarter notes.
Then, 8th notes, 8 note triplets, 16ths, sixtuplets, 32nds. The whole time, he does not alter the tempo of the metronome. I know that that ainīt rocket-science, but I thought it was great that he did that in this video, cuz many people donīt know how to practise with a metronome IMHO.
The whole "Rock Discipline" video is quite helpful and interesting, and there are a lot of things in this video that arenīt mentioned in most instructional videos.
Eric

EricV
01-07-2003, 02:53 PM
And one of the important things I discovered about using a metronome is:

When practising sixtuplets ( like i.e. the PG-lick ), instead of setting the metronome to a slow tempo ( i.e. 70 ) and playing sixtuplets, I double the tempo ( 140 ) and play triplets. To me, itīs way easier to get the right tempo that way. If you have like 70bpm per minute, itīs tough to distribute six notes absolutely evenly between two beats.
So I double the metronome time and play triplets instead of sixtuplets, or 8th notes instead of 16ths etc.
This was talked about in another thread here at ibreathe, too
Eric

Schooligo
01-08-2003, 01:20 AM
"And one of the important things I discovered about using a metronome is:

When practising sixtuplets ( like i.e. the PG-lick ), instead of setting the metronome to a slow tempo ( i.e. 70 ) and playing sixtuplets, I double the tempo ( 140 ) and play triplets. To me, itīs way easier to get the right tempo that way. If you have like 70bpm per minute, itīs tough to distribute six notes absolutely evenly between two beats.
So I double the metronome time and play triplets instead of sixtuplets, or 8th notes instead of 16ths etc."

This is great advice, Thanks.

I have been methodically reading all the Forum Posts, I'm current on the Beginner Threads, & also all the Practice & Performance Threads. Still working on getting current w/ the other forums!

Greg
01-08-2003, 06:14 PM
Hi everybody!

Another thing that was great about the Petrucci-video is that he really points out how long it takes to work up the speed in an exercise. When he demonstrated a chromatic sequence he explained how he usually start at a slow tempo (around 70 bpm if Iīm correct) and then increase the speed at about 8 bpm each time.

I use the method from Jamey Andreasī book "the principles of correct practice for guitar"(nice title...). He really made me realise that the metronome is not only an instrument to use be able to play in time, but also to force you to play SLOWLY enough. If I e.g have a sixteenth-note lick I start with 60 bpm and play whole-notes, one note over four clicks, which is VERY slow, but it enables me to focus in on things you otherwise might miss, like tension in the shoulder etc. Then you increase to 80 bpm, then 100 bpm, then I play half-notes at 60, 80, 100, then quarter-notes, eight-notes, and finally sixteenth-notes at 60, 64, 68, 72, 76, 80 and so on until I reach my limit, like 144 bpm.
When I canīt go any further, I make a note of that speed, and work up to that speed every day until I can go to the next step. It takes time, but itīs worth it, I promise you! I was amazed how many things Iīd overlooked in my practicing, things like WAY too much tension in the shoulders, hands, neck, even in the legs!

Why not give it a try? It shure helped me.

Greg

Schooligo
01-08-2003, 10:33 PM
"If I e.g have a sixteenth-note lick I start with 60 bpm and play whole-notes, one note over four clicks, which is VERY slow, but it enables me to focus in on things you otherwise might miss, like tension in the shoulder etc. Then you increase to 80 bpm, then 100 bpm, then I play half-notes at 60, 80, 100, then quarter-notes, eight-notes, and finally sixteenth-notes at 60, 64, 68, 72, 76, 80 and so on until I reach my limit, like 144 bpm.
When I canīt go any further, I make a note of that speed, and work up to that speed every day until I can go to the next step. It takes time, but itīs worth it, I promise you! I was amazed how many things Iīd overlooked in my practicing, things like WAY too much tension in the shoulders, hands, neck, even in the legs!"



This is great advice, Thank You!!