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View Full Version : Problems with creating progressions



Kenanana
06-23-2005, 05:09 PM
Hello all. I have a simple problem. I have a problem with creating progressions. The actual rythm part of things I have no trouble with like I know what kinda notes weather it be 8ths or 16th or what have you and where to put them but the actual chords I'm not all quite sure what to use where to use them and all that to achive a certin feel. Please if anyone knows anything post.Thankyou

forgottenking2
06-23-2005, 05:54 PM
Check out Chris J's articles (songwritting primer and both installments on chords and charts) and Guni's theory articles. Once you understand that it'll be a lot easier.

perth
06-23-2005, 08:20 PM
some people keep their progressions simple, others make them quite complex. some people use theory, others dont. some people start with a melody, others start with a harmony. some people spend alot of time figuring out progressions, and others just do it. theres so many different ways to do it that only one answer works: experiment alot, and continue to do the things that work for you.

silent-storm
06-24-2005, 07:00 AM
There was a famous Russian composition teacher, who's name I can't remember at the moment, who used to have a thick black line drawn across the doorway into his classroom at just below knee level. Whenever he was asked about why the line was there he would respond "you haven't written anything worth listening to until you have written enough music to stack that high." So, just start writting and experimenting and eventually it will come out.

And learn lots of songs. People that only know a handful of songs have no right to complain about their writting because they don't know how harmony works (not saying that is you). Learn a hundred songs and you should have a rough idea of what works and what doesn't.

Los Boleros
06-27-2005, 05:07 PM
There was a famous Russian composition teacher, who's name I can't remember at the moment, who used to have a thick black line drawn across the doorway into his classroom at just below knee level. Whenever he was asked about why the line was there he would respond "you haven't written anything worth listening to until you have written enough music to stack that high." So, just start writting and experimenting and eventually it will come out.

And learn lots of songs. People that only know a handful of songs have no right to complain about their writting because they don't know how harmony works (not saying that is you). Learn a hundred songs and you should have a rough idea of what works and what doesn't.Nice story.:p I concur about the one hundred songs. I was once told the same thing. When I reached the one hundred song mark, I noticed an increase in my confidence level. The truth is that once you learn a hundred songs, you should then be able to play much more than that.

bdemon
06-29-2005, 04:55 PM
Along with the above responses, I recommend studying major chord scales. There should be an article around here somewhere about them. Learning how a group of chords fit into one key will open up some great ideas.

Malcolm
06-29-2005, 05:58 PM
We had a pretty good discussion about this on another forum click here (http://www.guitarists.net/forum/view.php?forum=9&thread=49587) ---- about half way down Amos' first post.

Starts with this ..... "You want to pay attention to how chords want to move back to the tonic I". That section may be of interest.

On that forum I'm Amos..........