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rythmicillusion
10-14-2005, 03:44 AM
Hey All-

Although nearly every music book I have owned has an element of rhytmn in it, and some go more in depth, i haven't found a really good book focusing strictly on rhythm, encompassing the theoretical, technical, philisophical and applied. This might be a dumb question for the drummer folk out there as most of the texts I have are geared towards "the rest of us". So...anybody have suggestions?

Thanks!

Madaxeman
10-14-2005, 09:17 AM
www.learntoplaymusic.com
there is a book there that is devoted to rhythm. I haven't looked at that particular one, but I have other books in their Complete Learn to Play series w/2 CD's, and am impressed with them. The CD's have examples of all the lessons and backing tracks to play over etc...
Not sure if this is what you meant, but it's all I got.

gersdal
10-14-2005, 09:55 AM
Hey All-

Although nearly every music book I have owned has an element of rhytmn in it, and some go more in depth, i haven't found a really good book focusing strictly on rhythm, encompassing the theoretical, technical, philisophical and applied. This might be a dumb question for the drummer folk out there as most of the texts I have are geared towards "the rest of us". So...anybody have suggestions?

Thanks!
Not a dumb question at all, but I'm a little unsure what your asking for. Do you mean rhythm as in comping for a singer or solist (strumming etc) or do you mean rhythm in playing single lines (rhythmic creativity in soloing and / or reading rhythmical figures from sheet music)?

rythmicillusion
10-14-2005, 12:35 PM
Not a dumb question at all, but I'm a little unsure what your asking for. Do you mean rhythm as in comping for a singer or solist (strumming etc) or do you mean rhythm in playing single lines (rhythmic creativity in soloing and / or reading rhythmical figures from sheet music)?
The answer is really longwinded and pretty longterm overall...but I've lost a lot of my motivation with guitar from some inner turmoil and school(which I am leaving in about 2 months). I have always enjoyed drumming though have never lived in a place where I could have a kit...until very recently. So...for the next couple years I'll be focusing on drumming, all related rhythmic stuff and songwritting. Hence my need for some superior books on rhythm...already have a good teacher lined up, but wanted to see what people had to suggest.

Thanks for your help man, and if you know of anything more up that alley, that would be awesome

Spino
10-14-2005, 07:46 PM
Hey Ry,
You live in Boston right? .Why doncha check out Berklee,or speak
to one of the Tutors they'll be able to recommend somethin,
they've got a whole series of books published, on all music topics,
I'm pretty sure you'll find somethin there otherwise the only book
I know of is 4/4 Rhythm's by Louis Bellson.I had a hankering to be
a drummer when I started gettin interested in playin an instrument ,
but I opted for guitar cuz of the noise factor,but I still find drums
and perc totally facinating and my younger bro turrned out to be
a damn fine drummer. One thing about playin drums ,you'll never be
outta work.G'luck :cool:

perth
10-24-2005, 03:47 AM
The answer is really longwinded and pretty longterm overall...but I've lost a lot of my motivation with guitar from some inner turmoil and school(which I am leaving in about 2 months). I have always enjoyed drumming though have never lived in a place where I could have a kit...until very recently. So...for the next couple years I'll be focusing on drumming, all related rhythmic stuff and songwritting. Hence my need for some superior books on rhythm...already have a good teacher lined up, but wanted to see what people had to suggest.

Thanks for your help man, and if you know of anything more up that alley, that would be awesome

the first thing youll want to learn is rudiments. these are a group of exercises that all percussionists should know (and in fact, all musicians), even if they never "master" all of them (or never touch a drum kit). you can find these all over the internet, but www.vicfirth.com has what i consider the best presentation (and its free).

second, youll want to be able to apply the rudiments in any division of time (quarter notes, quarter note triplets, eighth notes, eighth note triplets, sixteenth notes, etc); be able to play them using any combination of limbs (left hand + right hand, left foot + right foot, left foot + left hand, left foot + right hand, etc); and be able to spread out notes from each rudiment over multiple drums (dont just practice your paradiddles on the snare and kick drum). this can get infinitely complex, so if you can't think of any more patterns or challenges, then you aren't trying hard enough.

in my biased opinion, rudiments are more important for beginners than learning songs, however, you should always be involved in some kind of musically oriented playing, whether its learning your favorite songs, writing, or transcribing. if you already know your rudiments, explore the concept of a groove. although i cant explain the concept of a groove in words (you have to "feel it"), generally speaking, if you can dance to it in one form or another, its a groove. there are some books out there that attempt to explain this, however they are really nothing more than real life examples and/or mathematic challenges, both of which you can explore with your ears, mind, and determination alone.

on a side note, your metranome is just as important as your drivers license. keep it with you and use it every chance you get.

good luck.