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jade_bodhi
11-30-2005, 01:05 AM
There are so many smart people in this group; I hope you can help me sort this out.

My title refers to me as a failed musician. That's not really true. I never wanted to be a professional musician. Never had the chops for it, or the illusions that I did. But I did have a lot of fun over the last twenty-five years, and continue to, playing in front of audiences, almost always in pubs and beer joints in the South U.S. As someone else put it so eloquently in one of these threads: "No big deal."

I always had a day job, raised a family. Now my kids have left, and I'm bored with my day job, which makes my wife's parents scratch their heads. I love music so much and love helping other artists achieve their goals in the studio, and I'm considering trying to get into the recording biz. But I have a lot of trepidation. I've never been a big risk taker, at least not in many years. I live in a rural part of the South, so I don't know if the biz would require me to move, something I don't like to think about.

I have recorded a number of groups in my home studio, using a digital deck recorder, but I have only the basic knowledge of this one set up. I don't know any of the industry standards, e.g. Pro Tools, etc.

How does one learn about the recording art and biz? I found a place in Ohio, U.S. called Recording Workshop that offers a five-week program for $3,000. I looked at the Full Sail program in Florida, but they want something like $75,000 for a two-year program.

Any insight you may have for how to approach this prospect would be greatly appreciated.

jade

SkinnyDevil
11-30-2005, 03:20 AM
Why have trepdation?

Why go to Full Sail or anywhere else?

Why move?

It sounds to me like you've already hung out your own shingle (part-time, at least). Just keep going and market the hell out of it, man! You want a new career? Sounds like your already doing it....

pelayo_jose
11-30-2005, 06:23 AM
Check out the SAE Institute... http://www.sae.edu

Probably there's one near you...

perth
12-01-2005, 05:39 AM
<snip>I have recorded a number of groups in my home studio, using a digital deck recorder, but I have only the basic knowledge of this one set up. I don't know any of the industry standards, e.g. Pro Tools, etc.

How does one learn about the recording art and biz?
<snip>

im running a mobile recording studio at the moment. the two biggest hurdles for me have been lack of experience, and financing the needed equipment and materials. if you can get past those (and it sounds like you've gotten past at least one), then you just need to have patience.

these resources (in addition to community support) helped me the most:

modern recording techniques, isbn: 0240806255
this buisness of music, (isbn not available)
any physics or basic electronics textbooks you can get your hands on

jade_bodhi
12-01-2005, 04:21 PM
Perth:

Thank you for your response, which is helpful. I'll look into those books you recommended. I also subscribe to Recording magazine, which sometimes is relevent to what I'm doing.

When you say "lack of experience" has been a hurdle to get over, are you talking about your own lack of experience? And what specific experience are you refering to? Dealing with musicians, advising them on production issues, familiarity with the technology?

As I said, I have learned to use the Boss 1600 deck, but I know it's just a powerful home recorder, and the industry standard is some kind of computer set up. What do you use? Thanks again for your response. I appreciate it.
Jade

dmsstudios
12-02-2005, 02:45 AM
Jade,

I ran a shoestring recording studio for a couple of years in a rural part of Tennessee (most of 'em are rural!) I was running everything into mixing boards and my computer (as opposed to DATS, ADATS, 1/2 tape, etc.) That stuff's expensive! And I don't subscribe to the audiophile bs about analog being the best of the best.

Like Perth, I had the learning curve issues (just building the studio is huge, let alone mastering the software & equipment), and it costs a lot of money. I did a lot of work there, but I did it for cheap because I couldnt compete with the high-end studios (and their low prices.) You should strongly consider whether or not your market can bear an additional recording studio (or if you can bear it financially.) I taught guitar & drum lessons out of the studio which made up a good chunk of my revenue (helped me survive.)

The upside is that I recorded a bunch of great bands & musicians (and a few rap groups from the ghettos - beware!), I was doing what I loved, I was making it (2 nostrils above water), and I was the boss. I hooked up with various bands and musicians that I still play with (and gig with) today.

I highly recommend that you do it (if it's feasible financially for you.) Let me know if you want any help with software (I used about 4 big ones and about 25 little programs.) Pro Tools is great, but very expensive. You can go a lot cheaper and still have great stuff. Make friends with a good carpenter (who is also a musician) and have them help you design and build-out the space that you have for the studio.

Have the time of your life right now! Go for it! I bet you'll be so glad that you did.

Dan

jade_bodhi
12-02-2005, 04:31 PM
Dan: Thanks for the encouragement. I am cautiously checking out the feasibility of such a venture and whether there is a market for it where I live. One uncertainty I have is that a lot of bands or musicians can now afford digital recording equipment, and may not be willing to pay for professional service. I suspect that the affordability of home recording equipment has hurt the market for the professional recordist. What do you think?

dmsstudios
12-04-2005, 03:32 PM
Jade,

I completely agree. It's very easy for someone to get some basic equipment (or just some software and a pair of headphones) and record their band themself. However, those brave souls will not be your market. There is a learning curve issue to consider - they would be better off going to a pro who knows how to do it right the first time, as opposed to doing mediocre recordings and taking months to figure the stuff out.

For me, recording took me AWAY from playing. I sat behind a computer screen for years mixing & editing. Even when I was recording my own stuff, I'd spend 2% of the time recording tracks, and the rest of the time tweaking & editing. Musicians need to be aware of this. If you wanna play - then play. (Or teach - at least you have your guitar in your lap.) If you wanna record, then you'll be the guy behind the hardware.

I had considered doing a mobile thing at one point (like Perth) and get a souped-up laptop and take it to the house where a band is playing. They pay me $x ($500? - $1,000?) and I go from the main board into my laptop and do a live recording track-by-track. Then take it back to the studio and do my magic, burn em a few CDs and the source CD, and voila! Like I said, I never did it. But, I still think the idea has legs.

Dan

jellynet
12-23-2005, 06:53 AM
A lot of it depends on how many people you know that would become your clients. You may even have to give out real good deals on some recordings to get some viral marketing going. Nothing really seems impossible to do.

As for learning all the stuff, there are lots of free documents online on building a studio. There are also books on pro tools, and all the likes at major bookstores such as B&N, more online even.

One of those things that you need to make a decision on wether you can sustain yourself for a while without guaranteed income from the studio. Then, once you make the decision, go full throttle with it to make it successful.

perth
01-04-2006, 01:41 AM
Perth:

Thank you for your response, which is helpful. I'll look into those books you recommended. I also subscribe to Recording magazine, which sometimes is relevent to what I'm doing.

When you say "lack of experience" has been a hurdle to get over, are you talking about your own lack of experience? And what specific experience are you refering to? Dealing with musicians, advising them on production issues, familiarity with the technology?

As I said, I have learned to use the Boss 1600 deck, but I know it's just a powerful home recorder, and the industry standard is some kind of computer set up. What do you use? Thanks again for your response. I appreciate it.
Jade

sorry about the delay in responding.

my lack of experience turned out to be in every facet of recording. i had been recorded before but i never did it for anyone else, i was unfamiliar with the differences between microphones (still am), and i had difficulty getting it right the first time since most of these recordings were completely live. i think dealing with musicians is the easy part, and dealing with everyone else is the hardest part.

im using adobe audition (computer setup) almost exclusively for tracking and mastering.

whackamole
01-30-2006, 03:32 PM
Sorry that this is a UK based post (so I can't recommend any courses etc.) but it's the principal I'd like to mention - as far as 'going for it' is concerned I have a friend in the North of England who has moved into the music recording/production field.
He knew nothing (NOTHING) about it but enrolled on a course in the city where he lives that is Pro Tools endorsed and has just finished the 18 month course and is now getting paid work. He is brilliant, simply because he kept positive and worked really hard.
If you want something bad enough you'll get it - research the courses and go for it - like you say you never did the pro muso route - but thats because you didn't want it bad enough.
You're on a bonus as you already have experience in recording.
I say go for it :)

Spino
02-01-2006, 09:00 PM
One step outside your reticence is
one step towards personal freedom. :cool:

Skyport
02-02-2006, 10:06 AM
There's tons of resources on the internet to aid home recording enthusiasts and pros alike, just type in 'home recording tips' or something into google and you'll get a wealth of info. There are as many discussion forums on that topic as there are on guitar playing, if not more. Not sure if I'm allowed to divulge the names of the websites that I prefer on this forum but I'd be glad to compile a list if it's in line with the forum rules.

jade_bodhi
02-02-2006, 01:48 PM
There's tons of resources on the internet to aid home recording enthusiasts and pros alike, just type in 'home recording tips' or something into google and you'll get a wealth of info. There are as many discussion forums on that topic as there are on guitar playing, if not more. Not sure if I'm allowed to divulge the names of the websites that I prefer on this forum but I'd be glad to compile a list if it's in line with the forum rules.

I think it's perfectly all right to compile such a list. I've seen it done in this forum before. Please do suggest some good sites.

Thank you.