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Malcolm
12-03-2005, 01:17 PM
Iím teaching myself standard notation. I should mention that Iím using an acoustic guitar in standard tuning. I am using lead sheet (single note) sheet music and have two questions. :

Ledger lines below and above the treble staff --- the 5th and 6th strings seem to take care of the notes on the ledger lines below the staff and it appears that any notes on ledger lines above the staff are played on the 1st string by advancing up the neck. Am I correct about the notes on the ledger lines above the staff? Using "my old scale patterns" as a guide -- we have two octaves within the pattern and if the third octave is played by going up the neck on the 1st string --- that makes it easy and clears up some other questions I had. Am I on track?

I have in the past used patterns for my scale/mode work and move the pattern to get into the correct key Ė on my lead sheet music it appears that this is handled with # and b notations on the notes. If that is correct? until I learn more, I think I can concentrate my efforts in the first 4 frets (like we do with open chords). Is this correct?

I seem to work best if I get a clear understanding of the big picture. Answers to the above questions will get my big picture in focus.

Thanks for your help. :)

Danster
12-03-2005, 02:41 PM
Disclaimer: Don't pay any attention to me because I'm probably wrong. :D


the 5th and 6th strings seam to take care of the notes on the ledger lines below the staff

Yep


and it appears that any notes on ledger lines above the staff are played on the 1st string by advancing up the neck.

Well, that is possible, but they can also be played on other strings in some cases. For example, an "A" on the first ledger line above the staff can be played on 1st string 5th fret, or 2nd string 10th fret, or 3rd string.... you get the picture.



I have in the past used patterns for my scale/mode work and move the pattern to get into the correct key Ė on my lead sheet music it appears that this is handled with # and b notations on the notes. If that is correct? until I learn more, I think I can concentrate my efforts in the first 4 frets (like we do with open chords). Is this correct?

I'm not 100% sure I understand what you're saying here. But when a different key is used, there will be a different key signature (different nos. of sharps or flats). For example, no sharps or flats in the key of C major, and one sharp (F#) in the key of G major.

Maybe that helps. Anyone can feel free to correct me, as most of my music theory learning is self-inflicted. :D

forgottenking2
12-07-2005, 03:46 AM
You're right on the money Dan. No shame in being self taught.

Malcolm
12-07-2005, 03:33 PM
Thanks guys, interesting only Texans seemed interested in Standard Notation.

Found this - click here (http://www.guitar49.com/ref/guitarnotes.pdf) thought you might like to have a copy.

Thanks again........

widdly widdly
12-08-2005, 01:19 AM
You are right in trying to concentrate on the first four frets first. You should be able to play in most keys here comfortably.

Using you scale patterns works for other keys but it is worth being able to play them in the open position as well (the first 4 frets). The scale patterns will be ok if you are only playing single note stuff but if you are playing bass, harmony and melody you will run into problems trying to finger everything.

That diagram malcolm linked is pretty handy but to me it looks upside down and back the front! I guess it what you are used to.

I recommend you check out the berklee methods. They are designed to teach sight reading and are really well set, starting in the open position then gradually moving up the neck and through different keys.
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Malcolm
12-08-2005, 11:45 AM
Yes the chart is a little hard to read - upside down - backward, etc. Ledger line notes are giving me a fit right now and it does help with those.

Looks like you really only have to memorize three lines above and below -- beyond that the few times you run across notes on the higher lines you could just make notations on the sheet music --- do you agree?