Welcome!
Just a few a ground rules first...

Promotion, advertising and link building is not permitted.

If you are keen to learn, get to grips with something with the willing help of one of the net's original musician forums
or possess a genuine willingness to contribute knowledge - you've come to the right place!

Register >

- Close -
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Songwriting

  1. #1
    Ohhhh Riggghhttt. headrulz101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    43

    Songwriting

    Well lately I've been writing and working on my own stuff but I seem to be having a bit of trouble with my progressions and rhythm. You guys got any tips for me? What are some common progressions in Pop Songs?

    The lyrical parts are going great and I seem to be having no trouble in this area.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Registered User Madaxeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    543
    Here is a link to a site that has different progressions...
    http://www.accessrock.com/Songwritin...rogression.asp
    Welcome to the club, as most of us have had the song writing blues at one time or another. (or in my case, constantly!)
    I will just pass on the tips I've recieved...listen to music that is the same as what you are trying to write. Analyze those progressions, and play those songs. When writing your own, start simple...keep playing your favorite bands, then gradually more complex songs will become a little easier.
    (Also...Google "common chord progressions" and you'll get plenty of sites like the one I listed.)

  3. #3
    Registered User leppard81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Austria
    Posts
    418
    Here are some progression that come to my mind:

    Candences (sp?) in C:

    I-V (C G)

    I-IV-V (C F G)

    I-IV-V-vi (C F G Am - this one seems to appear quite often in Sam Cooke songs BTW)

    IV-V-iii-IV (F G Em F) (this progession appears in Cindy Laupers "Time after time"; at least it sound very much like it)


    VI-V-III-IV (in D: Bm-A-F#m-G . This ones the progression of Marillions "Kayleigh")

    EDITed to add:
    iim7-V7-Imaj7 ("Jazz-cadence" Dm7-G7-Cmaj7)


    BTW: Its correct that minor degrees are written as lower case letter, right? Just not sure right now.


    ALEX :-)
    Last edited by leppard81; 02-05-2006 at 10:06 AM.
    We get the dreams that we deserve.... - Marillion

    Hidden Content


  4. #4
    Ohhhh Riggghhttt. headrulz101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    43
    Thanks guys. Yeah I'm quite a perfectionist and I'm never satisfied with what I come up with but I guess I gotta start simple and work on like you stated.

    Thanks guys!

  5. #5
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Deep East Texas Piney Woods
    Posts
    3,145
    If lyrics are not a problem you have it made. No point in re-inventing the wheel. Look at some of the songs you like. And copy their basic structure, then as you get better add your own "stuff".

    I play country out in public. Jazz at home with the door closed.
    Country is a basic four line verse. One chord progression for the first two lines and repeated in the next two lines. The last word in the first two lines rhymes with the last word in the last two lines....... over and over again.

    Now Jazz is way different than that, but, it's mostly old standards so again no one is really re-inventing the wheel, just taking that wheel and adding their interpatation............

    My point....... copy what others have done first.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    660
    The I-IV-V progression is very common, as someone has mentioned already. Also, another interesting progression is the I - vi - IV - V; for instance C - Am - F - G. Quite a nice sound. Or if you want a different atmosphere, treat the Am as the tonal center, and add the G and F chords, so you get: Am - G - F. There are so many possibillities. You should experiment!

  7. #7
    Ohhhh Riggghhttt. headrulz101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by Apple-Joe
    The I-IV-V progression is very common, as someone has mentioned already. Also, another interesting progression is the I - vi - IV - V; for instance C - Am - F - G. Quite a nice sound. Or if you want a different atmosphere, treat the Am as the tonal center, and add the G and F chords, so you get: Am - G - F. There are so many possibillities. You should experiment!
    Definately man. In the end, it's all about what sounds good to your ear.

    Thanks again!

Similar Threads

  1. Synth and electropop songwriting?
    By faintron in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-31-2006, 05:49 PM
  2. your preferred chord set for songwriting
    By fortymile in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-14-2005, 08:48 PM
  3. Step-by-Step Songwriting Guide
    By Bongo Boy in forum iBreathe Cafe
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-29-2003, 03:11 AM
  4. Songwriting article
    By EricV in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-26-2003, 12:32 AM
  5. Songwriting. Is it always this hard?
    By Franco in forum Composition, Arranging & Analysis
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-25-2003, 10:18 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •