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Thread: Using and resolving diminished chords

  1. #16
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Lydian Dominant

    Is the Lydian dominant part of another scale, like how the dorian is part of inonan? If so, what scale is it part of, and what degree of the scale is it??
    Joey D




  2. #17
    apprentice jazzer Hubert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeyd929
    Is the Lydian dominant part of another scale, like how the dorian is part of inonan? If so, what scale is it part of, and what degree of the scale is it??
    G Melodic Minor (or Jazz Minor) is

    G - A - A# - C - D - E - F# - G, so

    G melodic Minor from the 4th degree is

    C - D - E - F# - G - A - A# - C.

    In Leigh Powers' Scale Book (the only scale book currently in my possession) there is no mention of Lydian Dominant. He calls this the Overtone Dominant scale, adding that "the notes in this scale approximate the natural overtone series." I don't know why he doesn't call this the JM4 scale, seeing as he discusses other modes of Melodic Minor/Jazz Minor, such as JM2, JM5 and JM6.

    Apparently it can be used with dominant family chords, like 9#11 and 13#11.

    Regards,
    H u b e r t .

  3. #18
    iBreatheMusic Modthor phantom's Avatar
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    G - A - A# - C - D - E - F# - G
    Just to be correct it should be spelled:
    G - A - Bb - C - D - E - F# - G


    So from it's 4th degree it's:
    C - D - E - F# - G - A - Bb - C




    Playing that lydian-dominant (or overtone dominant or lydian b7) scale over a bV substitution is like playing the altered scale (melodic minor 7th degree) over the normal V-Chord. All alterations are included compaired to the original key.

    So if you are in the key of C the V-chord would be G7.
    Now play that G altered scale (equals Ab melodic minor) to get all the outside notes and create tension!

    Oh, one more funny thing:

    If alter a V-chord you get altered tensions.
    But:
    If you alter a bV substitution you end up getting natural tension notes. All alterations you do in that bV sub are "in key" again.
    Last edited by phantom; 06-02-2006 at 08:33 AM.

  4. #19
    apprentice jazzer Hubert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantom
    Just to be correct it should be spelled:
    G - A - Bb - C - D - E - F# - G


    So from it's 4th degree it's:
    C - D - E - F# - G - A - Bb - C

    I stand corrected.

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