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Thread: David Lucas Burge's Perfect and Relative Pitch courses

  1. #106
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    No, I guess in some earlier MC's. It just went away after some time I think.

    It is not a bad thing I believe. I think the ear will, at some time, adjust to the most efficient way of ID tones. Probably that is without hearing these "phantom tones".

    Take care,

    Elcon

  2. #107
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    seeing as this thread has taken on a life of it's own, I thought I'd chime in with a piece of advice for people that are well on their way to gaining perfect pitch.

    There are many computer programs that aren't made for perfect pitch but can be put to great use in order to gain it, especially if you don't have anyone to test you. Most of them are also free. If you are getting confident in your ability to name most of the 12 pitches, find any program that has relative pitch interval training. Most tests will give you the starting note, but just don't look at it and voila you have perfect pitch training. The best part about this is that you can usually change what instrument is playing the interval, which is great if you can only hear stuff on piano.

    The down side is that you have to be pretty confident with all 12 notes. That's why I think the best thing I've come across is just working with a basic notation program. (I haven't used it, but I know that finale notepad is free) You can set up completely random sequences of notes, set it to a slow playback, sit back and try to guess the notes. If you need to hear C often, or every other note, you can do that. If you only want white notes, you can do that. You can work on specific ranges. You can speed things up to make it harder. You can choose from dozens of instruments to play it back. The possibilities are pretty limitless. Just make it long enough so that you can sit down with the same track multiple times and not have to change things around much. But I guess once you get confident with all 12 notes, you can just click a button and transpose the stuff to come up with a new test.

    Anyways, just something I wish I had figured out when I first started doing all this stuff.

  3. #108
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by silent-storm
    seeing as this thread has taken on a life of it's own, I thought I'd chime in with a piece of advice for people that are well on their way to gaining perfect pitch.

    There are many computer programs that aren't made for perfect pitch but can be put to great use in order to gain it, especially if you don't have anyone to test you. Most of them are also free. If you are getting confident in your ability to name most of the 12 pitches, find any program that has relative pitch interval training. Most tests will give you the starting note, but just don't look at it and voila you have perfect pitch training. The best part about this is that you can usually change what instrument is playing the interval, which is great if you can only hear stuff on piano.

    The down side is that you have to be pretty confident with all 12 notes. That's why I think the best thing I've come across is just working with a basic notation program. (I haven't used it, but I know that finale notepad is free) You can set up completely random sequences of notes, set it to a slow playback, sit back and try to guess the notes. If you need to hear C often, or every other note, you can do that. If you only want white notes, you can do that. You can work on specific ranges. You can speed things up to make it harder. You can choose from dozens of instruments to play it back. The possibilities are pretty limitless. Just make it long enough so that you can sit down with the same track multiple times and not have to change things around much. But I guess once you get confident with all 12 notes, you can just click a button and transpose the stuff to come up with a new test.

    Anyways, just something I wish I had figured out when I first started doing all this stuff.
    Nice ideas, thanks! The way I do this is to record the notes individually on my computer, save them with the appropriate file name then enqueue them all in winamp, put it into 'shuffle' mode (or queue loads of them and randomise the order), then press play...voila! Random tones played on your own instrument.

    Current Listening:
    Gong - Expresso II

  4. #109
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by c_n12
    So how's everyone doing on there training?
    I have been too busy with work etc to maintain my daily practice schedule.

    Luckily I won't be so busy over the coming months.

    I started my RP course from the 5th intervals today and will aim for 10 - 15 minutes practice per day.

    I'll let you all know how I'm doing in a week or two.

    It's nice to be back.
    Last edited by Gstring; 10-21-2006 at 10:37 AM. Reason: Correction of spelling

  5. #110
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    Answering in order

    Eartraining is going great.
    I have improved so much for the past few days, it is almost incredible!

    I just figured, by the way, that trying to answer in order from bottom up actually helped me alot in giving correct answers. I now make far less mistakes then before. At least, for now...

    I used to just answer what I would hear first. I am talking about the three tone chords here. Perhaps it is all so simple you know, just by trying to hear in a particular order you focus/concentrate better so I make less mistakes.

    Also did I take two days going through the exercise very slowly. Listening to the tones again and again, before answering.
    And then, after I answered, I listened some more.

    Eventually, I did notice that it blurred my perception at some point, meaning that I got totally thrown off by what I would hear. That's when I got back to answering on instant perception, YET (very important) to answer from bottom up.

    How good have you become at perfect pitch "Silent-Storm"?
    Still on it, improving and stuff?

    Take care,

    Elcon

  6. #111
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    So, how's everyone doing now? Man, it's been long since I last checked this thread! I'm not very consistent with my practice now because of some other activity, but like I said before my pitch discrimination is still there and I think is improving even without "practicing" or sitting down doing all the drills. I use my tuner in my phone (by the way, it's a Sony Ericsson W300i - my girlfriend gave me as a birthday present) to check myself whenever I feel like doing it. I can now identify the key of a piece just by listening, chords too, but sometimes I could make mistakes of course. I hope I'll be able to find time to go back to doing the drills and be more confident with my perfect pitch.

  7. #112
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    Pretty cool Jazz!

    Already you are able to ID the key of a piece?

    I believe I did say that I can do it aswell, but not always no.
    But that's a timbre issue, if I am not able to do so though.

    Take care,

    Elcon

  8. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elcon
    How good have you become at perfect pitch "Silent-Storm"?
    Still on it, improving and stuff?
    Elcon
    well, I haven't worked on it for over a year and I never got to the point where it happened all the time regardless of what I was listening to, so to be honest I kind of lost a bit of it.

    Been toying with the idea of getting back into it. But the energy I'd need to put into it, so I could get to the point where I could use it all the time and maintenance would no longer be an issue, might be better used else where at the moment. Gotta have priorities.

  9. #114
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    Yeah, I feel ya.

    I have become pretty good now, but I have a lot more to go through before I'll be able to say "Hey, I have developed full Perfect Pitch"

    I now, again, start to sense how each tone is starting to become sort of different. They become more unique in a way.

    Though this is a good thing, it is also harder to ID them at times.
    It's like I eighter just know what the tones are or I get confused and/or desoriented, because I just cannot give it a place in the chromatic scale.
    It's like I am hearing new tones that neighter belong anywhere on the scale at all.

    I am doing good though, I can now get about a 100 times correct if I keep my head to it and listen carefully.
    It is yet a bit more difficult to just do it quickly and not make too many mistakes. I can easily be a semi-tone off if I do not pay enough attention.

    Take care,

    Elcon

  10. #115
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    Slowly but surely

    Well I am stuck in the first lightening round atm.

    The exercises are progressing fine. The spelling exercises are easy because I did a lot of theory when I was younger.

    So the intervals I am doing now are P5, P4 & M3.

    The lightening round only involves P5 & P4 ( and 8vas ) but they are played fast and you have to instantly recognise them. I got most but you can only have 1 strike or less in order to pass. Nevermind it'll come.

    We are way from tomorrow afternoon ( Thursday ) till Sunday evening so I can only do the exercises again on Monday. Bummer cause I was busy for a while and did not do them at all then. I have done the exercises daily for about the last week or so.

    Maybe I'll end up singing under the shower.

  11. #116
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    Funny thing

    Well you may remember me saying that my wife has an excellent ear...much better then mine. However I let her do the lightening round last night on her own ( whilst I was at college ) and by her own admitance she made a few mistakes.

    We tested each other on Harmonic P5, P4 lightening rounds on acoustic guitar and I got more right then she did !!

    I am really going to pump my ear today so that it can have a good break over the weekend.

    How is everyone else doing whether its PP or RP ??

    Have a nice weekend all.

  12. #117
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    nice topic you got here

    i have a question 4 u guys, during the first excerizes David instructed in his lessons, when u were listening the way he told u to lesson.. did some of you guys expereince a strange sound replacing the sound of the note, for example if u were on "G" and ur meditating on it, do u notice a sudden change of sound everyonce in a while? not a change of tone but the sound becomes a little wierd at least to me it did.... btw it only happenes if i'm repeating a single note, or chord (to unlock) over and over again..

    if you guys never expereinced it, is this normal during this training, or should i go check with an ear doctor? i truly hope that this is just my ear is becoming more open..

  13. #118
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    Change of sound

    I guess I know what you mean when saying that the tone may start to sound weird or something when meditating...

    I do experience this still only not mentally, but upon actual hearing it.

    Since we have not yet become too familiar and acquainted with these tones, they may seem to differ at times.

    I do not think that an AP-1 experiences these "aural illusions" regularly.
    But it occurs at times. It was an "born-with" AP-1, with over 40 years of musical experience, to hear a tone and not know what it is. He then says to mentally go up or down the scale to figure it out.

    Take care,

    Elcon

  14. #119
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    thanx elcon that really does explain alot

    a friend of mine told me it's nothing to worry about, and eventually the pitch will take over...

  15. #120
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    And how is everybody else doing?

    I recently, 4 days ago, noticed that I had been correcting my error the wrong way for the past few months.

    In just these 4 days my hearing got a good boost.

    It's amazing what things can do to the ear. I now hear the tones within the chords with such more clarity and precision. Wonderful, is it not?

    What I did wrong?

    I used to compare only the chords and listen attentively for the wrong and correct tone within those chords.
    Now I compare them isolated and I noticed a difference in perception that very same session when I started doing so.

    Take care,

    Elcon

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