Welcome!
Just a few a ground rules first...

Promotion, advertising and link building is not permitted.

If you are keen to learn, get to grips with something with the willing help of one of the net's original musician forums
or possess a genuine willingness to contribute knowledge - you've come to the right place!

Register >

- Close -
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: Question on Chord Progression and Direction

  1. #16
    bitter old fool Jed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,409
    A short musical example with a little extra stuff along the same lines
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Jed; 10-25-2007 at 04:01 PM.

  2. #17
    bitter old fool Jed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,409
    Quote Originally Posted by jimc8p
    Great post-mortem! It's a good way to look at chord movement, and gets your thinking out of the confines of a key. The minor sub-dominant is a great chord to use if you want to relax the slightly sickly sound of strict 7-note major key progressions.
    I think a lot of people learn theory as something seperate from the notes and intervals. This results in a disconnect that shows up in weird ways later on. I was taught theory in terms of how the individual notes relate to the key first. Later names and Roman Numerals were applied to describe what the notes did and so we could apply this new inforamtion in other keys more easily.

    Something like: II-7 V7 is short hand for the various different ways to move individual voices defined by the notes of the II-7 (the 2, 4, 6 & 1 scale degrees of the key) to individual voices defined by the notes of the V7 (the 5, 7, 2 & 4 scale degrees of the key).

    But if you only learn this stuff interms of chord types (guitar voicings / shapes), you'll never understand what the notes are or what they actually do / how they work. Even thinking in terms of scale degrees is just a short-hand way to define a system that works for all keys. But you still have to study / learn this stuff in terms of individual notes in one particular key to understand what the numbers, roman numerals and names stand for. Otherwise it's like talking to someone and using complicated language before you really know the definitions of those words. It seems to me a lot of people don't understand the basic definitions of theory concepts and hence don't understand what these upper-level constructs represent.

    cheers,

  3. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    50

    Cool

    D Gm Fsus4 F BbM

    Just another example from a scale rarely heard of.

    Thank God for chord generators
    Last edited by dublshot; 10-26-2007 at 04:59 AM. Reason: adding

  4. #19
    Bedroom metalurgist LaughingSkull's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Slovenia
    Posts
    929
    Quote Originally Posted by dublshot
    D Gm Fsus4 F BbM
    I suppose BbM is Bbmaj

    I can see chords from G minor; while D is from G harmonic minor.
    Ok, since Bb is the last chord, it will sound Bb major, with D instead of Dm. D being borrowed from G harmonic minor...

    Not exactly uncommon I would say.
    Last edited by LaughingSkull; 10-26-2007 at 07:23 AM. Reason: corruption of spilling

  5. #20
    Bedroom metalurgist LaughingSkull's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Slovenia
    Posts
    929
    Quote Originally Posted by dublshot
    Thank God for chord generators
    Don't do that. It's not good for you. You know how chords are generated?
    No? Find out or ask (here).
    Yes? practice generating them yourself! You can do that even waiting for bus, so no time wasted ...

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    50
    When you can access every chord/scale there is, borrowing is a needless, tedious, juggling act. But to each his own methods.

    And yes, I know how they work: mode math, chords from scales, and scales from chords.
    Last edited by dublshot; 10-26-2007 at 07:39 AM. Reason: adding

  7. #22
    Bedroom metalurgist LaughingSkull's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Slovenia
    Posts
    929
    Quote Originally Posted by dublshot
    When you can access every chord/scale there is, borrowing is a needless, tedious, juggling act.
    needless: ; everything in music is needless, we do it because we want to. we know that good music can be made of just one or two chords (So What), and with single scale (Mary has a litle lamb ), but I personally enjoy key changes and stuff, borrowing a chord or two can add spice to your harmony.
    tedious: no, not really. I enjoy it.
    Juggling act: cant get that one, if it is -- who cares.

    Quote Originally Posted by dublshot
    But to each his own methods.
    yep. perfectly right about that.
    I got the impresion that, you wanted to say that progression:
    D Gm Fsus4 F BbM
    comes from a single scale. If that is so please, enlighten me cause I am always eager to learn.

  8. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    50
    Its the G Mela Varunapriya. I love those 'exotic scales' and how they contrast to the more common neighboring scales.

    I believe that there is a scale behind ever phrase of music expression, so when you borrow from another scale, you are most probably completing the progression and defining the scale that its really in.

Similar Threads

  1. modal vs tonal approach to improvisation
    By Revenant in forum Improvisation
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 10-25-2007, 04:30 AM
  2. Modes( yes i know )
    By blackmint in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 05-26-2007, 11:27 PM
  3. Melodic Minor Progressions
    By LaughingSkull in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-18-2007, 05:40 AM
  4. What makes some cadences stronger than others?
    By shaunp in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 01-10-2007, 05:59 PM
  5. Frustrated.. dazed and confused..
    By battleguard in forum Music Theory
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-07-2006, 06:31 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •