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Thread: Extended intervals?

  1. #1
    Registered User
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    Extended intervals?

    Could anyone show me a chart with all the extended intervals?

    I'm meaning. 9, #11, 13 e.t.c

    I can't find them anywhere.

  2. #2
    Registered User Joe Pass Jr's Avatar
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    If you mean a chord chart showing how to play chords with those type extensions, you will probably benefit more from working it out yourself.

    Assuming thats what your asking and assuming you already know how to build 4 note chords. Here are some examples of how I approach the common forms.

    G13

    (3) <play this G note if you wish
    5 < E note 1 octave above the root of the chord. 13th degree.
    4
    3
    (5) < generally this note is omitted, 5th degree.
    3

    ----

    G7 #5

    (3) <play this G note if you wish
    4 < Eb note, #5
    4
    3
    x
    3


    ---

    G7

    (3) <play this G note if you wish
    3 < natural 5
    4
    3
    x
    3


    ----
    G7 #11

    (3) <play this G note if you wish
    2 < C# = #4 or #11
    4
    3
    x
    3

    ---

    As you can see by these examples all the extensions you need are within the simple forms. Its just a matter of knowing which notes equal which extensions. Play the scale that fits over that chord shape and familiarize yourself with each scale degree then simply adjust your chord shape to include the extension your after.

    I hope this gets the ball rolling for you.
    Its not the techniques you use, but the music you make.

  3. #3
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    Post

    let me add two cool ways to play a major maj7 #11 (finger position in paranthsis):

    1 (1)
    1 (1)
    3 (2)
    4 (3)
    4 (4)
    2 (1)

    and

    1 (1)
    4 (4)
    3 (2)
    4 (3)
    2 (1)
    x

    its just standard barre chords, but the index finger crosses the fret and plays the two lighest (or in the second case, the one lighest) notes one fret lower than the root. Takes a little practice, but not a lot.

  4. #4
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wintermute
    Could anyone show me a chart with all the extended intervals?

    I'm meaning. 9, #11, 13 e.t.c

    I can't find them anywhere.
    There are various ways to show this information, so it depends on how much (and why!) you want to know.

    Eg, here are all the diatonic extensions (stacks of seven 3rds from each chord root, staying within the key) on the chords in a major key:

    I = 1-3-5-7-9-(11)-13
    ii = 1-b3-5-b7-9-11-(13)
    iii = 1-b3-5-b7-(b9)-11-(b13)
    IV = 1-3-5-7-9-#11-13
    V = 1-3-5-b7-9-(11)-13
    vi = 1-b3-5-b7-9-11-(b13)
    vii = 1-b3-b5-b7-(b9)-11-(b13)

    The ones in brackets would never normally be used in practice, because they make awkward clashes with lower chord tones (they're what jazz players call "avoid notes"), but all the others are fair game.

    Just to explain the numbers:
    Plain numbers are either major intervals (3, 7, 9, 13) or perfect ones (5, 11).
    "b" indicates either a minor interval (b3, b9) or diminished (b5).
    "#" indicates an augmented interval (#11).
    In chord symbols:
    b3s are shown as "m".
    b7s are shown as plain "7". Major 7ths are shown as "maj7".
    b5, b9, #11, b13 would be shown as such.
    "9", "11", and "13" always imply the inclusion of the 7th.

    In key of C major, therefore, these chords are possible:

    Cmaj13 = C E G B D A (no 11, F)
    Dm11 = D F A C E G (no 13, B)
    Em11 = E G B D A (no b9, F or b13, C)
    Fmaj13#11 = F A C E G B D (in practice, you wouldn't get all 7 notes - 5th or 9th might be omitted, they sound OK but don't contribute much.)
    G13 = G B D F A E (no 11, C)
    Am11 = A C E G B D (no b13, F)
    Bm11b5 = B D F A E (no b9, C, or b13, F. In practice, you hardly ever see a Bm11b5, but 11ths crop up quite often as melody notes on m7b5 chords. And in fact, m7b5 chords are pretty rare as viis in major keys; more common as iis in minor keys. If you see Bm7b5, you are probably in A minor, not C major.)

    Minor keys often produce fancier chords, especially altered dom7s.

    Eg, an E7 chord in key of A minor might have a b9 (F), #9 (Fx = G), #11 (A#) or b13 (C).
    In this case, b9 and b13 are apparently not "avoid notes" (go figure...).

    In addition, you can have "lydian dominant" chords = 7#11, 9#11, or 13#11. These derive from the 4th step of melodic minor, but are used in other situations. As with lydian mode, all 7 notes of the scale are usable as chord extensions.

    With ordinary dominant 7ths, the 11th is an avoid note, but if you omit the 3rd the 11th can be included, making a 7sus4 (or 9sus4 or 13sus4).

    Sus4s remind me of "non-tertian" chord extensions/additions. "Tertian" means built in 3rds: 1-3-5-7-9-11-13.
    Non-tertian extensions means any of the other notes: 2, 4 or 6. These are obviously the same as higher tertian extensions, but are not used in the same way.
    Eg, a C6 chord is different from a Cmaj13 or C13 chord (mainly because it lacks the 7th, which defines the chord function).
    And 2 and 4 are often used in place of 3 to make sus chords. Sus chords can often be "quartal" (built mostly in 4ths).
    Eg, a G7sus4 could be voiced D-G-C-F, all perfect 4ths.
    A C69 could be voiced C-E-A-D-G, all perfect 4ths except for the bottom major 3rd.

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