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Thread: perfect pitch training disks

  1. #1
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    perfect pitch training disks

    has anyone heard of the perfect pitch sytem that is being advocated in some magazines.if not go to www.perfectpitch.com and have a look. let me know what you think.
    see ya Peter

  2. #2
    i Breathe ... Admin Guni's Avatar
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    Hi Peter,

    I'm very careful with all those methods that promise you to gain Perfect Pitch. Most musicians don't have Perfect Pitch. I met 2 guys in my life that I know of having this - they were born with this gift, or curse . Next to naming any note they heard they had the ability to tell if a note was flat or sharp. Hehe, they really got upset when playing in a band and someone was slightly out of tune (I really wouldn't have noticed that). Well, I couln'd back this up with any medical documentation (I'll have a look around if I can find a site). I heard once that there are different varieties of 'Perfect Pitch' out there. But in general it comes down to that someone is able to identify a heard note by name.

    Most musicians have a quite good 'Relative Pitch'. The difference being that you can set heard notes or chords in relation to each other, say in terms of intervals (root and fith) or in a progression (II V I). Basically, the same way you learn harmony you should learn on how this sounds, starting with intervals, triads, melodies, chordprogressions etc etc .....

    Also, when playing guitar for a while you will recognise the timbre of certain notes on the guitar (which some of those 'Perfect Pitch' methods try to sell as Perfect Pitch). So ya will be able to say: Hey, this tune is in A (just to realise that the guitar is tuned down by a halfstep and it actually is in Ab). But you can hear the timbre of the instrument and know where this note is played. Same goes for all other instruments of course.

    Personally, I think this is a big issue and I am not sure where this 'desire' for Perfect Pitch is coming from. Relative Pitch is your friend

    Guni

  3. #3
    i Breathe ... Admin Guni's Avatar
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    ok, I can't help noticing a few holes on this website:

    "Gain a PERFECT EAR for music and play like a pro"

    erm ... so without perfect pitch no pro? (I guess we should ask the pros like Neil in our powwow what he thinks :-)

    and

    "Did you know that you have a NATURAL, inborn ability for Perfect Pitch? But -- like most musicians -- maybe you have yet to discover it."

    ouch, sorry, but this really sounds like one of those "Make $2000 in 5 days" spams I receive every day.

    ... and I really had some fun with the "Success Stories"

    Guni

  4. #4
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    Hi Guni

    I agree there... I haven´t checked any of these products but I saw many of their ads and usually was turned off by them... they´re really kinda corny.
    I never heard anyone tell me "Dude, I used those perfect pitch-CD-methods and it made me what I am today"... what I know is that guys like Steve Vai did it the regular way... playing, listening and transcribing as much as possible.
    That is a very natural way of working on your hearing, your pitch recognition and relative pitch.
    I believe that my hearing aint that bad, and all I did was constantly jamming with others and transcribing stuff, plus listening to bunches of music in general.
    Really, never heard of anyone who went crazy about those "Perfect Pitch" methods, I´m sure if it was that amazing we would have heard some success stories that were on OTHER sites than theirs...
    Just my opinion
    Eric

  5. #5
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    ... and you´re right about the "success stories"... this is REALLY corny. I mean, if you check user reviews of guitar gear like the ones at harmony-central, people don´´t mind giving away their name and email-addy for people to contact them with more questions....

    This use of initials instead of full names is kinda... suspicious if you know what I mean
    But hey, that system and the ads have been around for a while... just like the ones for x ray-glasses
    Warm regards
    Eric

  6. #6
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
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    Perfect Pitch

    The entire concept of perfect pitch is a farce.
    What people have is relative pitch, ther is nothing sacred about the tuning we use ( 440 Hz for A), in the past it was common to use 435Hz.
    Since Most of us here are guitar players we all have tuned flat or sharp a few times, sometimes even on purpose ( I like to tune down 1/2 step). A person with highly devloped relative pitch can tell that note 1 is roughly 440hz, but what about those people who grew up listening to 435 tuned instruments? When I was a child my piano was from the 1800s and was tund to 435hz ( maybe that is why I like to tune to Eb? Sure you can train your self, if you are lucky enough to have good ears, to know what pitch is what and to blurt the note name to impress your friends, but what good is it really?
    Every type of hearing is based on your past experiances and you cannot assume that ANYONE can really tell the difference in frequency between say 440 and 440.1 Hz, even when hearing the two tones in succession.
    I am very lucky genetically, poor tuning drives me crazy, people have "claimed" that I have perfect pitch, being an electrical engineer I know better!

    There is no such thing.
    Just tin ears, relative pitch, and really good relative pitch.

    James

  7. #7
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    thanks fellas, you saved me $130.

  8. #8
    Mode Rator Zatz's Avatar
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    LOL guys!

    Fun how you uncrowned the charming stupidity of perfect pitch mistery

    Absolutely agree with you folks!
    I could add just one practical advice how to improve relative pitch perception ability. You might call it my "success story" (hehe).
    Here it comes. You don't even have to drag your guitar strapped over yourself all around the place to train at it. My simplest ever method is try to copy but every sound you hear whatever the source, with or without any kind of distortion. You don't have to sing it out loudly (though it would be the best way) - just reproduce the sound in your mind once you've heard it at home or in the street. Be it a car meep or anything else - every sound has its main frequency along with overtones which sometimes are clearly heard. Sing em too! Develop your volumetric perception of sound!
    I for one like to sing it tune with my vacuum cleaner . It's a terrible intensified unison noise I must tell ya

    So have fun and enjoy music that lives within every single thing on this planet and beyond it

    Ultra mega best regards,
    Zatz

  9. #9
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
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    ...

    It is what it is...
    Just another of the plethora of ways of separating you and your money.

  10. #10
    i Breathe ... Admin Guni's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Zatz
    I for one like to sing it tune with my vacuum cleaner . It's a terrible intensified unison noise I must tell ya
    Oh my! I LOVE vacuum cleaners. When we bought our last one I drove the guy in the store close to suicide. I didn't care about the Watts this thing had but I wanted to listen to it. I mean, to me this is like buying an instrument and a tool for eartraining. I use the constant pitch for singing intervals to it....... mmmm, maybe it's time to see a shrink

    Hey this would be an idea for selling yet another 'Perfect Pitch' method. We could name it "Vacuum Cleaning Part 1 - Gaining Perfect Pitch in 10 cleaning sessions".

    "Ever wondered why cleaning personnel has better Pitch than any Pro musician out there ......."

    okokok, enough is enough

    Guni

  11. #11
    Mode Rator Zatz's Avatar
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    We could name it "Vacuum Cleaning Part 1 - Gaining Perfect Pitch in 10 cleaning sessions".
    Geez it's fun! LOL
    Imagine funky office-cleaners on stage!

  12. #12
    i Breathe ... Admin Guni's Avatar
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    LOL eyeyeyey .......

    Lemme add something to the 'Relative Pitch' topic. One thing that really helped me a lot was solfege. Berklee's eartraing is based on it. In the beginning I was a bit sceptical as I did a lot of eartraining before and therefore thought why I would need something new. But after a few month I saw the first improvements and the value of this concept.

    Anybody else who has experience with this ?

    Guni

  13. #13
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    Yep that helped me out a lot in school. Being a guitar player I could pick things off record, but sight singing and transcribing lines out of the blue was completely new stuff. And somewhat overwhelming. The solfege was a savior. We did fixed and moveable (I to this day hate fixed.) The moveable being where the tonic is always doe.
    I always stress to my students the importance of singing (even if you have a voice like a bull frog). For Example I have them practice say a one octave major scale (singing the solfege as they play each note up and down the scale). Once they get comfortable with that (And that may take a long while) I have them do the same thing only they drop every other note as they play and work it up where there playing every three, four notes and so on until they can just hit the tonic and glide up and down. Then of course using other keys as well. Then progressing to singing chords tones and intervals etc. I Still do this in fact I’ve been working on singing modes doing this (which was something for some stupid reason never occurred to me until I saw Steve Vai mention it).
    It’s one thing to know the modes in theory or fret board but I think you have to really hear them to understand the big picture. I learned there sound from playing a pitch axis kind of thing against a drone note, playing over progressions or linking them to songs or licks ex. Zeppelin’s “Dancing Days” sounds Lydian. While this is a good approach and a necessary one I think its bassackwards and pale in comparison to actually singing them.
    One thing I always found during improvising is “I’m probably not gonna play something I can’t sing (at least in my head).
    My vote is it’s a good topic for an article.
    Excellent Job with the Site btw!
    As well as the Interval, triads, chord scales etc articles you did (I’ve seen them many times as I had encouraged several of my students who were prepared to take that no return leap into theory to download them from the old site. Luckly no one’s made it to chord scale three yet as vast portions of that go sailing over the top of my head But I’m working through it.)
    "All other things being equal, the simplest solution is usually the correct one." William of Occam

  14. #14
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
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    Solfeg(ietto)?

    What are you guys talking about?
    I no a little about sight singing but what is this solfeg?

  15. #15
    Registered User MusicMuse's Avatar
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    Well, I actually tried the Perfect Pitch course. In the beginning you're given two notes, say E and F. They are played one after the other and after a few minutes, you can say 'oh, that's an E' or 'that's an F'. They are as different as two colours. But it's when other pitches get thrown in that things get interesting (confusing). What it seems to come down to is developing highly sensitive relative pitch.

    Solfege is use of syllables in singing. Do re mi fa so la ti do. In C major, Do would be C, re would be D, etc.

    Has anyone worked with GNU Solfege? It's free ear training software. Go to http://solfege.sourceforge.net/

    Peace,
    -Musicmuse
    Music is Everything. -asi

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