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Thread: help me mate in playing lick in particular chords

  1. #1
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    help me mate in playing lick in particular chords

    hi guys,
    1.please guys help me in teaching the particular notes to be used in the particular chord in particular root note say C i.e., while playing in c[root] major scale if the chord changed to some f[relative chords]or g [relative chords] i couldn't able to play the exact notes which matches that chords so please help me guys
    and also i need to learn to play good lick in the particular chord rotation i mean in am,f,g and c,f,g,f and ext ,actaully i am confused in playing the licks in the particular chords like this ,and all time if i try to play some lick i can able to produce only same kind of lick ....so please hlp me to learn the effective licks and how to play a different kind of licks which must played in the particular chord ration

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    please some one reply me .....can you guys understand my request ? .....

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    you might want to try to break your question up into a bit more parts. Its a bit confusing as to what your asking.

    -matt

  4. #4
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Yes I'm having a little problem knowing what you want.
    1.please guys help me in teaching the particular notes to be used in the particular chord in particular root note say C i.e., while playing in c[root] major scale if the chord changed to some f[relative chords]or g [relative chords] i couldn't able to play the exact notes which matches that chords so please help me guys
    Need two things - the notes in each major scale. http://www.ibreathemusic.com/forums/...ad.php?t=11975 You will find what you need on the second post.
    Then the chord formula to use to make the chord.
    http://www.smithfowler.org/music/Chord_Formulas.htm Combine those two things and you can make any chord.

    Any Major chord is made from the 1, 3 & 5 notes of the scale so......
    C Chord would be C E G
    F chord would be F A C
    G chord would be G B D
    G7 chord would be G B D F
    ... and also i need to learn to play good lick in the particular chord rotation i mean in am,f,g and c,f,g,f and ext ,actually i am confused in playing the licks in the particular chords like this ,and all time if i try to play some lick i can able to produce only same kind of lick ....so please help me to learn the effective licks and how to play a different kind of licks which must played in the particular chord ration
    Good licks -- For melody notes and chords to sound good with each other both should contain some of the same notes. When your melody notes move on to notes not found in the old chord you ear tells you that you no longer are harmonizing -- and you need to find another chord that does contain some of the notes found in the new melody. That's important, if it did not sink in go back and read that again. OK - let's turn that around. If you know the chord you know what notes will sound good over it. For example:

    Good licks (melodic phrases) normally contain chord tones (notes) of the chord you are playing over. That being the case over the C chord your lick notes should hang out around the C E and G notes. Over the F chord you should hang out around the F A and C notes. You do not have to keep up with the specific notes necessary IF you play pentatonic patterns........ Let the pattern put the safe notes under your fingers. If you are playing over a Dm chord the D minor pentatonic pattern will automatically place just safe notes for you.

    Look to the pentatonic scales. Over major chords play the major pentatonic and over minor chords play the minor pentatonic. Here is why:

    C Chord = these notes C E G
    C Major pentatonic = these notes C D E G A -- so -- Three of those pentatonic notes will be safe (good) the D and A will not sound bad, however can best be utilized as passing notes, i.e. not downbeat notes and don't end the phrase on them.

    Is there more to this? Yes, however, this will get you started.

    Good luck.

    Malcolm
    Last edited by Malcolm; 04-22-2009 at 04:56 PM.

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    Malcolm,

    u are absolutely correct i am weak in english ......thank you mate

    Code:
    Look to the pentatonic scales. Over major chords play the major pentatonic and over minor chords play the minor pentatonic. Here is why:
    
    C Chord = these notes C E G
    C Major pentatonic = these notes C D E G A
    but Malcolm,
    i couldn't able to understand clearly can you please able to exaplain me some what ?????thank you
    Last edited by funkygarzon; 04-22-2009 at 04:49 PM.

  6. #6
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Look to the pentatonic scales. Over major chords play the major pentatonic and over minor chords play the minor pentatonic. Here is why:

    C Chord = these notes C E G
    C Major pentatonic = these notes C D E G A
    The C scale has these notes.
    Note interval 1, 2,. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    C Scale....... C, D, E, F, G, A, B
    As a Major chord is made from the 1, 3 and 5 note of the scale.......
    A C Major chord would have the C E and G notes in it.

    A Major pentatonic scale is made from the 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6 notes of the scale
    So the C Major pentatonic scale would have the C D E G and A notes.

    You need charts from those two sites I gave you to know what notes -- I failed to give you warning what a major pentatonic scale formula was.

    A minor pentatonic scale will use the 1, b3, 4, 5 and b7 notes of the MAJOR scale. b3 means flat the 3rd interval and b7 means to flat the seventh interval.
    Scale interval....1, 2, 3, .4, 5, 6, 7
    D Major scale is D. E .F# G A. B .C#
    So the D minor pentatonic scale would include the D F G A C notes.

    Better?
    Last edited by Malcolm; 04-22-2009 at 05:07 PM.

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    sorry to distrub you Malcolm,

    can you please able to exaplain me more ...cos the major pentatonic and relative minor pentatoniv has same note but how to give a diffrent feel while playing a lick ?

  8. #8
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Good question. The feel comes from the chords played under those notes.

    Chew on this -- I'll be adding more.

  9. #9
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by funkygarzon
    sorry to distrub you Malcolm,

    can you please able to exaplain me more ...cos the major pentatonic and relative minor pentatoniv has same note but how to give a diffrent feel while playing a lick ?
    Good question - the chords used under those notes give the Major or minor feel.

    Scale interval....1, 2, 3, .4, 5, 6, 7
    D Major scale is D. E .F# G A. B .C#

    To find the chords in the Key of D Major you use this formula:
    I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, viidim

    Scale interval....1, 2,.. 3, ...4,. 5,.. 6,... 7
    D Major scale is D. E ...F#.. G ..A... B ...C#
    Formula........... I..ii.....iii....IV..V... vi. .viidim
    Chords for D.....D.Em .F#m G ..A ...Bm .C#dim

    Now using the key formula to find the minor chords use this formula:
    1, iidim, III, iv, v, VI, VII. and you come up with these chords:
    Dm, Edim, F#, Gm, Am, B, C#

    So if you were to play the D, G, A7, D chord progression and use Major pentatonic notes you get a major sound.

    If you were to play the Dm, Gm, Am7, Dm chord progression and use the Dm pentatonic notes you get a minor sound.

    Got a meeting starting - ask questions I'll answer when I get out of the meeting.

    Malcolm
    Last edited by Malcolm; 04-22-2009 at 05:48 PM.

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    Malcolm,

    thanks a lot for your explaination realy you are genius man .....great ;
    ..thanks a lot for the relply ........

    i have few more doudts to ask you;

    mate i clearly understood which you have explained me in the above
    post ,but my problem is i couldn't able to play the effective note for the chord rotation which my keyboardist plays i mean if my keyboard player playes the ratation(repetation) of chords like d,g,a,d in the root note of d major in 4/4 count i couldn't able to play the effective notes cos i don't know what are the notes should be played for a particular chord i mean notes for each and every chord (d,g,a,d)and you know we can't wait in a same note for long time so for each chord we have to play more note which shoud match the chord and also should have to give more feel ...this is my problem i hope you have understand me ....please i am weak in english sorry ,if you don't understand please tell me ....thanks in advance
    Last edited by funkygarzon; 04-23-2009 at 06:20 AM.

  11. #11
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    Check which "Key" you are playing in. You need to be sure about that.

    All the chords should be from the same Key (in most songs). Then play notes from the scale that matches that key.

    For example - if you are in the key of G-Major, then your basic chords are G-Major, A-minor, B-minor, C-Major, D-Major (or D7), and E-minor. All those chords come from the scale of G-Major. So play notes from the G-major scale over all those chords. That's all you need to do.

    Same thing if you are playing any other Key. Say you are playing in the key of A-minor ... then just play the chords from the key of A-minor, and play an A-minor scale over all of them (to make it easier - play A-minor pentatonic scale if you want).

    The point is simple - You must know which chords are in the key, and then just play a scale that matches the key.

    There are lots of more complicated things you could do. But for now just do it as described above.

    Ian.

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    Crossroads,

    thanks for the reply ,i understood what you have said but i need to play the effective complicated lick which should sound good , so what are all the thing i should know in single root note say C major......my friend

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    Quote Originally Posted by funkygarzon
    Crossroads,

    thanks for the reply ,i understood what you have said but i need to play the effective complicated lick which should sound good , so what are all the thing i should know in single root note say C major......my friend
    OK, if you want to play what you call " an effective complicated lick which should sound good in C-Major " .... then all you have to do is try playing the different notes in the scale of C-Major, and just keep trying them until you find which notes sound good to your ears.

    Ian.

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    Crossroads,


    please mate help me in giving me some lesson or some theory for the effective lick i mean the famous guitar players tips and techniques so that it will helpfull of me..thanks in advance

  15. #15
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by funkygarzon
    sorry to distrub you Malcolm,

    can you please able to exaplain me more ...cos the major pentatonic and relative minor pentatoniv has same note but how to give a diffrent feel while playing a lick ?
    Depends what kind of different feel you want.
    If you mean major or minor, then that's determined by the chord.

    Eg, if you're playing over a C major chord, then any lick you play will sound major. The "A minor pent" scale (A C D E G) will sound like C major pent, because of the chord.

    Likewise, if you're playing over an Am minor chord, your licks (using the same notes) will sound minor. The "C major pent" scale (C D E G A) will sound like A minor pent, because of the chord.

    To repeat - the same lick (same notes, same pattern, same order etc) will sound different depending on the chord you're playing over.
    (If you don't have any chord, just playing by yourself, then ending licks on C will make them sound major, and ending them on A will make them sound minor.)

    Notes that "sound good" are (in the first place) notes that are in the current chord - as Malcolm was explaining.

    So if you have a C chord, then the notes C E and G will fit, and sound right. (You don't have to know these note names, just know a few shapes for the chord - and play the notes in the chord. Any order will work.)

    OK - just notes in the chord is boring! So the next good notes to add are the extra two from the pentatonic of the chord root. (Again, this is what Malcolm was saying). On a C chord, that means adding D and A (2nd and 6th notes from C), to get C major pentatonic (C D E G A). (You can call this A minor pent if you like, it's the same notes, and use a pattern for that.)
    These 5 notes are a lot more interesting and melodic. You can create lots of good licks out of them. You may not need any more.
    Still, it's a good idea to start and end any lick with one of the chord notes (C E or G). This will round off your phrases nicely.

    Same rules apply to any other chord you have. Say you have an F and a G chord:

    F chord notes = F A C
    add 2 to get F major pent = F G A C D

    G chord notes = G B D
    add 2 to get G major pent = G A B D E

    or maybe an Am chord?

    Am chord notes = A C E
    add 2 to get A minor pent = A C D E G (this time you add 4th and 7th)

    Notice there's a lot of notes in common with all these scales! In fact, they all add up to 7 different notes: C D E F G A B - which is the C major scale. (All these chords are "in the C major key".)
    So in a sense that one scale is used over all the chords. But it's still good to focus on some notes more than others on each chord.

    This is still all about understanding the difference between "good" notes (in-key sounds) and "bad" ones (off-key sounds). That's an important foundation.
    "Inside" sounds do get dull after a while, and you can progress later to experimenting with "outside" notes (that don't fit) - although these are technically "wrong notes", they can add surprise, mood or excitement, if properly handled. But you need a good ear, some experience, and a basic knowledge of the "inside" stuff to make it work.

    As well as understanding this theoretical stuff, you need to listen to players you admire and work out what they're doing yourself. Start simple (obviously!) and try to play along with some easy songs. Listen to the singer and try and repeat what they sing. If you can't get the notes right, try and get the rhythms right. You will get better at this the more you try. (Start with tab and chord charts, but only use them for reference. Listen to all the stuff that ISN'T in the tab...)

    There are no short cuts here. All the great players you admire started the same way: they were once in your position, but they just sat down and tried copying the people they liked. Some of them might have had lessons, some of them might have gone to music school - but most of them (in rock music anyway) didn't. Most of them didn't know any theory (and I guess some of them still don't ). Most of them didn't have the internet to ask questions on either.

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