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Thread: Jimmy Bruno guitar Institute?

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  1. #1
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    Jimmy Bruno guitar Institute?

    Anyone have any experience with this? I'm about to sign up and wanna make sure.

  2. #2
    JazzNerd gersdal's Avatar
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    I've heard a lot of good words about it (some nearly religious). Theory seems to be disregarded, so IMHO a bit of common sense is needed - keep on looking at the theory side of music.

    I'd love to know what you think if you join. I might consider it myself

    A few comments on JB that I found interesting (all from JazzGuitar.be).

    Hi,

    I've been studying at Jimmy's institute for 3 month and have just logged of a couple of weeks ago. But not because I didn't like it, I just don't have time enough. I have got a very good local teacher a couple of month ago, who keeps me busy all the time and I go to jamsessions, learn songs, etc...

    What I liked about Jimmy's institute:
    - A very motivated teacher with the mission to educate guitarists all over the world
    - A well thought method
    - Lot's of printed material for download
    - A good forum with motivated students

    What I didn't like:
    - Jimmy says "books are for idiots". Well I think, there are a couple of very good books out there.
    - Jimmy says that analyses won't make a good jazz guitar player out of you. But there have been a lot of very good guitarists, who have learned a lot by analysing songs and the solos of others
    - There could be more material concerning comping. You learn lots of chords and also chord-melody, but there isn't much material about comping in a band situation

    What I would suggest:
    If there is no good teacher in your area, join Jimmy's institute, but also get a good book on theory (one with a good cd demonstrating the topics). Connect the things you learn at the JBGI with the theory. Learn lots of songs and analyse and learn the favorite licks of your favorite players. Play as much as possible with others.

    If you have a good teacher in your area, take lessons with him/her. Face to face lessons have many advantages: you can ask as many questions as you like, the teacher has a better look on your technique (especially right had), you will get lots of tipps from the teacher (listen to that, go to that concert, etc), a teacher gives you deadlines for learning new material, a teacher might know other people you can play with, etc.
    But also do all the other things I mentioned above.

    Another tip: I like the DVDs of Mimi Fox a lot. But it's a lot of work going through and imho it's not for beginners.

    Cheers, Chris
    Jimmy Bruno's site is by far the best site to learn Jazz online. I've checked them all out and nothing come close. This site is so comprensive it's amazing. You can send in videos, jimmy will post your vid for all to see and on the same page he posts a vid of himself going over what you submitted. I've learned more in 7 months fron JBGI then real live lessons for 2 years.
    And for $20.00 a month its amazing, i would pay a hell of alot more what i'm learning. Finally i can see myself becoming a very good Jazz guitarist.
    Ken R.
    It has been almost 2 months since I joined and I have concluded that it is well worth it. I wish this site had been around 20 years ago when I first picked up the guitar - I would be infinitely better than I am now. Some observations:

    1. This is a very systematic step-by-step approach. It is like having a syllabus for how to proceed to learn improv.

    2. There are no shortcuts. You have to practice, practice, practice. You will get out only what you put in. The beauty of it is that you are told what to practice and in what order - again, it's very systematic.

    3. I have not taken advantage of posting videos of me doing the exercises and getting critiqued, but it is worth watching the other students and (some) of Jimmy's critiques - I find only a minority of the critiques to be useful - mainly because there is only so much a person can say about somebody else doing scales.

    4. The materials (mainly pdf files) are useful to print out for self-study.

    5. I have learned the fingerboard to a much better extent than before.

    6. His improv system actually is very easy to apply to other types of musical genres -especially rock, where the songs are all in one key rather than changing keys every few bars like jazz. When I use his system, I am able to solo confidently all over the neck rather than being stuck in one pattern like I had been doing before.

    7. He really points out the logic of the guitar fretboard, so there is far less memorization. There are many "a-ha!" moments.

    8. You don't need to learn the modes and various scales. This is both good and bad. It is bad because without knowing theory, you are not really undertanding why you are doing something; knowing the theory behind what you are doing makes you a smarter player in my opinion and also helps with composing and arranging your own material. On the other hand, not having to know the theory behind what you're playing at any given moment actually makes it easier to keep playing and not get lost. In other words, you don't need to think "ok now I am playing the e-flat bebop minor scale and now the chord is changing to something else, what do I play now?" By the time you figure out what scale needs to be played, its already a different chord and a different scale. Jimmy's system doesn't require you to do that kind of on-the-spot thinking, which is great for keeping playing. But learning the theory somewhere else let's you understand why what you played worked. I recommnd the Jazz Theory Book by Levine, touted elsewhere on this website for that purpose.

  3. #3
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    You are on jazz guitar.be too aren't you?

  4. #4
    JazzNerd gersdal's Avatar
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    Yes. Not much, tho. IbreathMusic is home

  5. #5
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    what about the mark elf program?

  6. #6
    JazzNerd gersdal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by metaljustice83 View Post
    what about the mark elf program?
    No idea Anybody else?

    PS
    U SUguitarguy?

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