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Thread: Learning from Scott Henderson Dvd. Day one to day.............

  1. #1
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    Learning from Scott Henderson Dvd. Day one to day.............

    First of all the user guide. Thanks to Crossroads


    Originally Posted by Crossroads
    OK well ... look at the very start of the DVD where he begins by talking about the scale options for playing over Major chords -

    - he starts by saying the first option is obviously to play C-Maj scale ... and then he improvises some stuff. But you can see that all he is doing is playing notes from pattern-1 of the C-Major scale in 8th position (remember the root note C is at 8th fret on low-E string) ... and then he extends that a bit by playing a few notes from the next pattern up (ie pattern-2) ... and then maybe he goes down a bit into the next lower pattern below 8th position (ie pattern-5).

    So if you know those C-major scale patterns starting in 8th position then you should be able to work out what notes he is playing, ie work it out by a combination of listening to the sound of each note and watching on film roughly which frets he's playing at .... IOW - you need to transcribe for yourself what he is playing, ie write it all down on TAB paper (or write it as notation if you find that easier) ...

    .... if you have never tried to transcribe much guitar stuff by ear and also by what you can see on screen, then you might find that quite hard to do at first and it may take you quite a long time to work out some of the things he plays (especially later in the DVD as things get more complex) ... but I think it's really essential to do that ... that's the way you really start to learn things ie by transcribing what you hear, and by realising that he's telling you each time what scales he is playing ... so of course you also need to know all those scale and arpeggio patterns all over the instrument ...

    ... but again, that is fantastic and essential practice and really vital to make sure you learn all those scales and arpeggios that he uses. And again, the way to begin doing that (if you don't already know them all ... and I suspect only a very few guys on this forum really know them all) is to get Guthrie Govan's first book which has almost all the scale & arp patterns very clearly displayed on two double page spreads ... so that's really convenient, because it means you can prop that book open on a music stand an display all the patterns at a glance ... and you will almost certainly need to keep checking those patterns as you play and as you watch the DVD ...

    ... when he starts talking about which arpeggios and triads (3-note arpeggios) he uses, then if you look at the double page spread of all those arpeggio & triad patterns in Govan's book (ie have it open on a music stand) then you will pretty soon find that instead of trying to memorise all the different patterns it's actually easier in the end to work them out for yourself on the fretboard by knowing the intervals between each note, ie just by visually recognising the geometric shapes that the different intervals make ...

    ... and of course that ties in directly with what you were asking about in another thread re. how to learn intervals ...

    ... if you do that, ie start learning to play the arpeggios by working them out as intervals, then you will find that particular exercise alone is great practice for seriously advancing every aspect of your ability to play. Though even when you can work out all the intervals (they are just the chord tones of course), the Govan book is still essential as a reference just to check that what you are working out as intervals also corresponds to the printed arpeggio patterns in the book.

    So that's it really. You just do that for everything Henderson plays on the DVD ... each time plays an example of using a particular scale or arpeggio over any particular chord, then you need to watch to see which area of the fretboard he's playing in, play the scale pattern or arpeggio in that position (look in Govan's book to check the patterns), listen to the notes he plays, and work out how to transcribe it all on to paper ...

    ... and then experiment yourself with what he is explaining, eg if he says C-Lydian scale is an option over a C-Major-7 chord, then just trying hitting a C-Maj-7 chord and then playing a bit from C-Lydian scale ... then hit the chord again, and then improvise a bit more from C-Lydian ... then maybe mix C-Lydian with the other options that he gives eg mix it with C-Maj scale and mix it with whatever arpeggios he suggests.

    OK, so that's the general idea. But here's a suggestion - if you want to just take another brief look at the DVD for a few mins then try this - immediately after showing you C-Major scale over a C-Maj-7 chord, the next thing he does is to talk about passing tones ... and then he improvises some stuff using C-Maj scale with loads of passing tones ...

    OK, so what? Well to get an idea of the way he uses passing tones, go now to the second half of the DVD and listen to what he plays in his 4 examples called Jazz-Blues solo-1, solo-2, solo-3 and solo-4 ... those are 4 musical improvised examples where he uses a lot of passing tones in a very nice musical & creative way ... so have listen to those 4 short improvised solos, and realise that is what results from his initial explanation at the start of the DVD about how to use passing tones in the C-Maj scale over C-Maj-type chords.

    That may all sound much more complex than it really is when I try to describe it in words as above. But it's really all very straightforward - just sit down with your guitar, the DVD, and a stack of blank Tab paper for transcribing, and really just get completely immersed in all he is saying and everything he plays ... that's your whole practice routing for the next 3 years, really! ... that's it ... if you really apply yourself to that DVD then you will end up as a very good technical and musical guitarist with a thorough knowledge of essential theory basics & how to apply it all in your playing.
     

  2. #2
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    Just got it I'm suprise cause i kind of understand what he is talking about.
    Day one ... Cmaj7

  3. #3
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    Spent 2 hrs jamming on CMaj7. I should have done this before but i din'nt know how. Now i know. Nothing genious but better that what i use to play. I had fun mixing the Cmaj7 scale and the F and G triad.. Loll
    I know more theory that i can play so for now the Dvd suts me.
    I'l stick there for a while an after i'l go to the next step


    Wonder how much he got paid to wear that restaurant chicken Bbq t-shirt ?

  4. #4
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    just recently checked out this video,

    imagine my surprise to realize this DVD is actually 2 separate OLDER videos combined

    not saying its a bad thing, but it's nothing new

    companies many times will take older music or videos and combine them and repackage them, then sell them as a new product

    that's what this DVD is

    just be aware there's nothing new here as far as i can tell

    now that doesn't mean it's not valuable

    what is on the video is still quite helpful, one of the better instructional guitar videos out there in my opinion

    especially the DVD part about melodic phrasing,

    i don't see ALOT of videos exploring and teaching this aspect of improving your musicianship

    and Scott H is a good instructor

    the part about scales can be challenging for beginners,

    but all in all a good instructional DVD
    "Success is arriving at a Personal Satisfaction within yourself"

    Dedicated To Guitar!!!

  5. #5
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    Guys - sorry I haven't posted anything on this yet (after suggesting a discussion of this sort ... ditto re, Speed Mechanics) - I will try to pick up on this and start posting some regular on-going comments re. using the Henderson DVD (and on Speed Mechanics too).

    But the reason for my delay is that the exceptional warm weather in London prompted me to put the guitar down for a few days and sort out my garden, but in doing that I have now pulled some sort of tendon or something in the third finger of my fretting hand (duh!) ... so it may be a day or too before I can pick up the guitar again and check through some of this stuff a bit more before posting (bit tricky to type here with it too ... ouch!).

    Schooligo - oh yeah, we know the DVD is re-cut from Henderson's two original videos over 20 years ago (I've said that dozens of times here before ).

    But music theory and good playing don't age in that way. And that DVD is full of all the stuff guitarists need to know in order to improvise effectively with scales and arps over different chord types.

    Part-2 is also an excellent demonstration of phrasing and musicality ... I have around 80 guitar DVD's (and about as many instructional books), and frankly I don't think there is another book or DVD which even comes close to the value and relevance of that Henderson DVD.

  6. #6
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    OK, I'm going to try posting a start to discussing the contents of the Scott Henderson DVD (1). And I thank Michel for picking up the idea on getting a thread started.

    I'm also very well aware of what Malcolm said earlier re. the initial difficulties encountered with similar ideas on other forums. Particularly the fact that we probably don't really have enough active regular posters here to generate more than a few brief replies (which is a shame, since I truly think this is by far the best forum I have come across for any serious guitar player).

    Efficient Set-up of Practicing Environment - Michels post already quoted me on this, but just for the sake of trying to spell out what might easily seem like trivial details too obvious to be worth mentioning -

    - the way I practice from this DVD is to have a couple of music stands with books open at the relevant pages for reference on scale and arpeggio diagrams (2, 3). And also a stack of blank TAB paper to transcribe almost everything that Henderson plays on the DVD.

    Then, obviously, I watch each part of the DVD, and try to play through the same scale patterns that he does, in the same positions. I transcribe on paper what he is playing. Then I try myself to improvise over the same chords using the same scales and arpeggios that he suggests.

    C-Major Scale over C-Maj-7 type Chords. The DVD begins with what to play over Major-7 type chords. And for simplicity all his examples are for C chords. That is ... first C-Major Chords, then C-Minor chords, then C-diminished chords, and so on.

    So in the first section on C-Major-7 chords, the suggested scales and arpeggios apply equally to playing over all other C-Major type chords, such as C-Major-9, C-Major-11, C-Major7-#11, C-Major-13.

    The first suggestion is obviously to simply play a C-Major scale. That is by definition in key with C-Major type chords.

    So if guys are not really up to speed on knowing the Major scale really thoroughly in all patterns and all positions all over the fretboard, then there is your first hurdle - it's essential to practice the Major scale until it's almost like instant second nature everywhere on the instrument.

    Obviously, if you don't know the major scale quite that well (and it's my impression that very few guitarists do), then you cannot afford to spend years stuck at that very first 2 minutes of the DVD whilst you become a master of the major scale in every key.

    So you have to start with a practical compromise, which is to realise that the Major scale is super important (perhaps the most important single thing in all guitar playing). So put in a good solid effort on practicing that scale to memorise it as well as possible whilst listening to what Henderson says, and whilst transcribing what he plays. But don't spend more than say an hour each day/session just practicing the major scale patterns before continuing from the DVD.

    To practice the Major scale I used the patterns in Guthrie Govan's first book (2). The advantage of that book is that the scale patterns are particular clear and all the patterns are together on one double page spread, so you can have all of them on display at once on a music stand whilst you are trying to practice them.

    Passing Tones. After talking about the major scale, Henderson then talks about passing tones, eg approaching a scale note from a half-step above or a half-step below. And he improvises an obvious example with passing tones everywhere throughout the C-Major scale. I don't think you need to transcribe that, because all he is doing there is to put passing tones between absolutely every scale note ... so he ends up playing every single note on the instrument. But obviously his point is that it is essential for you to practice by improvising with the C-Major scale and playing passing tones as freely and as often as you like, just to get used to that idea.

    Notated Lines. As part of emphasising passing tones, he then plays 4 specific "lines" or "licks" in C-Major, which mostly have various passing tones in them. And the notation is shown on the screen. So if you don't read notation, well now's your chance ... because now you need to write out those 4 notated lines/licks for yourself on TAB paper and practice them over a C-Major chord backing.

    Re. the C-Major scale, when he plays those specific lines/licks, he explains that instead of just playing the lick itself, you need to play into and out of the lick by improvising around it with notes from the major scale (inc. passing tones too). That will probably be the first thing on the DVD which really challenges most players. Ie, firstly to transcribe what he plays there. And then more generally to practice improvising with his 4 notated lines to play into them and out of them in a musical way using the C-Major scale with passing tones.

    Obviously, apart from practicing those 4 lines exactly as he plays/notates them, it's a good idea to take his 4 notated lines and mix the notes up a bit to create your own variations. See if you can come up with something musical of your own based on improvising into and out of lines like that using the C-Major scale with passing tones.

    OK, I think that's a natural point at which to stop here, because after that the DVD goes to the next idea which is using C-Lydian scale over C-Major chords.

    Memorising the Major Scale Patterns. Perhaps the last thing to say before we leave the C-Major scale is that when you try to learn that scale, eg from the patterns in Govan's book, you might approach that learning process in various ways.

    The most obvious way is just to try memorising each different pattern.

    Another way might be to attempt memorising each note by knowing the intervals from one note to the next.

    Personally I did not use intervals as a way of learning scale patterns. But I did do that in order to learn arpeggio patterns, where I think intervals are somehow a more natural and intuitively obvious way of learning. And that's important, because of course arpeggios do turn up a great deal through the rest of this DVD.

    But finally, here's a tip for learning the major scale patterns, which I found useful - instead of trying to memorise all 5 patterns for each mode of the major scale, what I eventually found most useful was to just memories pattern-1 for each mode (pattern numbers as shown in Govan, ref 2) ...

    ... then when you play pattern-1 of C-Major = Ionian mode (ie 8th position), you know that the pattern directly below that must be pattern-1 for the 7th mode ie Locrian beginning on B, because the mode directly below Ionian is 7th mode. OK so maybe we don't often use Locrian, but no matter, because that's actually the same pattern as the 6th mode beginning on A ... that is - directly below 7th mode must be pattern-1 of 6th mode beginning on A ie A-Aeolian (ie Natural Minor scale) ... and directly below that 6th mode must be pattern-1 of 5th mode, ie G-Mixolydian pattern-1 with G at 3rd fret ... and so on.

    To describe that another way lets go up from C-Ionian at 8th position - the next pattern up after Ionian must be the 2nd mode, ie Dorian pattern-1 beginning on D at 10th fret .... and from there, the next pattern up from 2nd mode must be 3rd mode ie pattern-1 of Phrygian beginning on E at 12th fret ..... but again I don't often use Phrygian, so I just think of that exact same pattern as pattern-1 of 4th mode but with the root at 13th fret, ie pattern-1 of F-Lydian .... and so on.

    The advantage of memorising it that way is that I can go straight to any position on the fretboard and instantly play the correct pattern for C-Major scale ... because I know for example that in 3rd position ie starting on G the pattern must be identical to pattern-1 of G-Mixolydian.


    certain edits in blue

    References

    1. Scott Henderson, Jazz Rock Mastery, DVD, Alfred Publishing 2006
    2. Guthrie Govan, Creative Guitar Cutting Edge Techniques vol-1, SMT Sanctuary Publishing 2003
    3. Don Mock, Melodic Minor Revealed, Alfred Warner Bros Publishing 1998
     
    Last edited by Crossroads; 04-23-2011 at 06:36 AM.

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    So in the first section on C-Major-7 chords, the suggested scales and arpeggios apply equally to playing over all other C-Major type chords, such as C-Major-9, C-Major-11, C-Major7-#11, C-Major-13.
    Can you post here the fingerings he's using in these chords. I spent a couple of hours trying to find them. I tried with several different ones but any of them gave me the sound he's getting on the DVD (the notes were correct but not exactly the same shape).

    Thanks

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    Can you post here the fingerings he's using in these chords. I spent a couple of hours trying to find them. I tried with several different ones but any of them gave me the sound he's getting on the DVD (the notes were correct but not exactly the same shape).
    Thanks
    Yeah sure .

    I'm not looking at the DVD right now, so I'll just try to describe the chord shapes from my hand written notes of what he played. Also, I don't have any easy way to display the usual chord boxes here, so I'm going to write the chords in letters saying which fret is played on each string, for example if I write D(3) that means play the D string at 3rd fret.


     
    C-Maj-7 chord barr across 3rd fret + D(5)+G(4)+B(5)
    or just A(3)+D(2) + all other strings open

    C-Maj-9 chord A(3)+D(2)+G(4)+B(3)

    C-Maj-13 barr across 3rd fret + D(5)+G(4)+E(5)
    or A(3)+D(2)+G(2)+B(3)
    or barr across 7th fret +E(8)+B(8)

    C-Maj-7#11 barr across 2nd fret+A(3)+G(4)+B(3)
    or A(3) + G(4)+B(5)+top-E(2)
     
     

    OK now I'm going to write out those exact same chord shapes again, but I'm going to include the interval which each note represents, like this D(3 =5th) means the note played at 3rd fret of the D string is the 5th of the chord (same thing as 5th of the scale). I'm doing that so you get used to checking each note in the chord to be sure which interval it represents. That way you can be sure that the chord notes are correct for that particular chord, eg I mean - if it's say a Maj-9 chord, then one of your notes must the 2nd=9th of the chord or scale.
     

    C-Maj-7 chord barr across 3rd fret + D(5 =5th)+G(4 =maj7)+B(5 =maj3)

    or just A(3 =root)+D(2 =maj3) + all other strings open (note that open B-string is the maj-7th of C)


    C-Maj-9 chord A(3 =root)+D(2 =maj3)+G(4 =maj7)+B(3 =9th)

    C-Maj-13 barr across 3rd fret + D(5 =5th)+G(4 =maj7)+
    E(5 =13th)

    or A(3 =root)+D(2 =maj3)+G(2 =13th)+B(3 =9th)
    or barr across 7th fret +E(8 =root)+B(8 =5th)

    C-Maj-7#11 barr across 2nd fret+A(3 =root)+G(4 =maj7)+B(3 =9th) note the bar gives you top-E at 2nd fret which is #11 ... ie E(2 =#11=#4=b5th)

    or A(3 =root) + G(4 =maj7)+B(5 =maj3)+top-E(2 =#11)



    In the above chord shapes, for simplicity/convenience you mostly are not playing the low-E string. But notice that a barr across the 3rd fret would give you a chord tone on the low-E anyway, ie E(3 =5th of C-chord/scale).

    Finally but very importantly - I might have actually helped you and others more if I'd replied refusing to give any chord shapes (I'd never actually do that lol ), on the basis that - if you learn those visual shapes for intervals, then you can very easily work out for yourself and check for yourself whether any chord shape is correct, inc. chord shapes that you invent entirely for yourself.

    edit to add a suggestion for a chord book - I recently (last Christmas) bought ď Bruce Buckingham, Chord Melody (Guitar), publ. by Hal Leonard Musicians Inst., 2007 ď . Iím finding that book far more useful and far more readable than the widely recommended Chord Chemistry by Ted Green (which I personally found unintelligible despite its universal acclaim). Again, the Bruce Buckingham book is not suitable for complete beginners ... not because itís too complex or anything like that, but because itís not just a list of chord diagrams, but more specifically gives theory explanations for all sorts of chord shapes (jazz chords) and chordal ideas. Great book, and excellent as a practical aid in practice sessions.


    So just as some pointers on interval shapes - you know that 3rd fret of the A-string is the note C, ie the most handy root of any C chords in 3rd position ... but from there - the 2nd fret of D-string is maj-3rd (remember that shape!), and 1st fret of D-string would be min-3rd (remember that shape too!).

    And ... from C at 3rd fret of A-string, the 5th of the chord/scale is at 5th fret of D-string (remember that shape too!) ... and if you move that note back one fret to 4th fret D-string then it makes that 5th flat, so that note at D(4) is flat-5th of C which is the same as #4th of C which is the same as #11th ...

    ... next - notice that 5th fret of the G-string is an octave up from C at 3rd fret of A-string, so G at 5th is also the note C. Further notice that directly above 5th fret G-string ie 5th fret D-string is the note we just explained above as the 5th of the scale, ie the 5th is directly above the root (remember that shape too!) ...

    .... and then - one fret below C is the maj-7th of C, eg 2nd fret of A-string or 4th fret of G-string .... and then notice that ...

    ... two frets below C is the min-7th, eg 1st fret of A-string or 3rd fret of G string.

    .... notice also that from C at 1st fret of the B-string, the 9th (=2nd of the scale) is at 3rd fret of B string (remember that!).

    OK, I just very quickly dashed off all the above interval stuff from my head lol ... so I may have made a few typo mistakes there (tried to check the chord shapes very quickly on guitar, but maybe some typos there too lol!), but any mistakes in the above are even better, because - you deffinitely need to check all those intervals shapes for yourself, starting on say C at 3rd fret of the A-string (ie check & memorise the visual shapes on the fretboard) ... and just get really familiar with where the 3rd is from the root note, and then where the 5th is, where the maj7th is, the min-7th, the b5th=#4th, the 2nd=9th, and even the 6th=13th .... when you've done that then go back to the chord shapes above, and check each note to see what interval that note makes relative to C as the root of the chord (same thing as the root of the "scale" .... the intervals are the same thing as the "Scale steps"). Check Guthrie Govanís book and his pages of arpeggio diagrams to really practice getting used to those interval shapes (ie especially in respect of working from the Henderson DVD)


    By the way - when I first looked at the Henderson DVD, I also was not immediately sure what chord shapes he was holding down ... but as I say - I think itís essential with that DVD to just sit there for however long it takes and work out and transcribe on paper almost everything he plays, inc. the chords shapes. That way you really will learn a huge amount of vital stuff from that DVD ... and of course that was his intention (and our intention here) .


    edits - a few edits added to mention chord book by Bruce Buckingham and to put in some brackets and spaces to make the chord notation clearer. (
    Last edited by Crossroads; 04-24-2011 at 07:51 AM.

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    Ok, now I saw your reply. Thanks

    By the way - when I first looked at the Henderson DVD, I also was not immediately sure what chord shapes he was holding down ... but as I say - I think itís essential with that DVD to just sit there for however long it takes and work out and transcribe on paper almost everything he plays, inc. the chords shapes. That way you really will learn a huge amount of vital stuff from that DVD ... and of course that was his intention (and our intention here) .
    That's exactly what I've done. I've found several different shapes for all the chords (using the "intervalic" approach) but what puzzled me was that none of them was exactly those that Henderson was playing (and I also suspect that, within each shape, he doesn't play all the strings).

    I'll take a look at your reply tonight. Thanks again.

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    I've looked at it. I came up with some different chord shapes...like you said, some of them were not completely correct.

    As usual, I came up with a song with those chords. Although they're all CMaj, the different subtilities give each one a distinct sound which is great to create backing tracks for experimentation.
    Tonight I will start to transcribe what he plays on top of these chords.

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    Notated Lines. As part of emphasising passing tones, he then plays 4 specific "lines" or "licks" in C-Major, which mostly have various passing tones in them. And the notation is shown on the screen. So if you don't read notation, well now's your chance ... because now you need to write out those 4 notated lines/licks for yourself on TAB paper and practice them over a C-Major chord backing.
    I've transcribed the first lick:

    G# - F# - G - F# - F - D# - E - G - B - D - C

    I think he should have used less passing tones but maybe he was short on time in the DVD.
    Anyway, and this is my newbie oppinion...this lick has so many passing tones that it makes the lick a"passing lick itself, i.e., it only sounds good if used as a bridge between two phrases from the CMaj scale. Playing this lick isolated in a CMaj7 chord context doesn't sound very good.

    And if we use a lot of passing tones, it stops being CMaj scale to become a different thing. Yesterday I came up with a phrase to follow this lick with some passing tones and it turned out to what seemed to be a some mode. It was lated and I couldn't transcribe it but I will try to do it from memory during the weekend.

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    OK, ... part-2 ... to pick up the DVD from where I left off ...

    ... the next option is to use Major Triads. Over a major seven chord (or major-9, or major-11, or major7#11 etc. ... any of those chord types), you can play major triads on the three major degrees of the scale (in this case the "parent" scale is the scale of C-Major).

    So over a C-Maj-7 chord you can play -

    a Triad on the root (C-Maj Triad)
    a Triad on the 4th (F-Maj Triad)
    a Triad on the 5th (G-Maj Triad)

    OK, so now instead of just reading that list of 3 triads and trying to commit that to memory, pick up your guitar, look at the Triad arpeggios in Govan-1 page 80 Examples 4.43 (see part-1 for reference list of books), and play those triads in 8th fret position, ie that's the position in which you'd play pattern-1 of the C-Major scale.

    When you do that, you should notice something. However I'm not trying to write a guessing game here, so I'll tell you what you should notice. You should notice that those three triads add up to all the notes in the C-Major scale and not any other notes.

    That's why those three major triads work over C-Major-7 type chords - because they are all contained within the C-major scale, and together they add up to the full 7 notes of the scale.

    OK, the next option is pentatonic scales. Henderson describes this by saying you can play minor pentatonics on ...

    minor pentatonic up a whole step (D-minor pentatonic)
    minor pentatonic on the major 3rd (E-minor pentatonic)
    minor pentatonic on the 6th (A-minor pentatonic)

    But again notice something. In fact notice exactly the same thing as we just noticed for the three major triads above - firstly, those three pentatonic scales are the ones from the minor degrees of the scale. That is - D-min pentatonic is from step ii, E-min pentatonic is from the iii, and A-minor pentatonic is from step vi of the major scale.

    That's exactly the same thing as saying you can play Major pentatonic on the major degrees of the scale, which would be -

    C-Major pentatonic (ie the major pentatonic on the root)
    F-Major pentatonic (ie major pentatonic on the 4th)
    G-Major pentatonic (ie major pentatonic on the 5th)

    But of course C-Maj pentatonic is the same as A-minor pentatonic .... F-Maj pentatonic is the same as D-minor pentatonic, .... and G-Maj pentatonic is the same scale as E-minor pentatonic.

    So if you prefer to think of the pentatonic scales as minor patterns, which is the way Henderson's says he thinks of them (and the way I also think of them), then what you are doing is playing minor pentatonic scales from each of the minor degrees of the parent C-Major scale (the C-Major scale is the parent for C-Maj-7 type chords) .... so to repeat, you'd play :- A-min pentatonic, D-min pentatonic, and E-min pentatonic.

    But again, if you play those three pentatonics in 8th position so that you can see how their notes correspond to the notes of pattern-1 of the C-major scale, then you will again find that they add up exactly to the 7 different notes of the C-major scale. Which is exactly the same result that we just discovered above for the three major triads.

    The next thing is to get a little "OUTSIDE" of the chord. That is to play a scale or arpeggio that has one or more notes that are not in fact in the C-major scale.

    The most gentle option to do that, ie the option with least dissonance, is to play the scale pattern called C-Lydian "mode". Again, you can find all the patterns for Lydian mode in Govan-1 page-85 Example 4.52.

    But notice this - if C is to be our Lydian step, that means that we are making the note C to be the 4th degree of some major scale .... because the 4th degree of any major scale is the Lydian degree.

    So the question now is - what major scale has the note C as it's 4th degree? To answer that you simply count back from C as 4 ... ie, if C is 4, then B is 3, A is 2 and G must be 1. So now we have found that C-Lydian is the same scale as G-Major. I'll say that another way - the G-Major scale has C as it's 4th degree, ie it's Lydian degree, so C-Lydian is the same set of notes as the G-Major scale.

    C-Lydian mode = G-Major scale

    Again - if you play pattern-1 of C-Lydian in 8th position to compare it with the notes of the C-Major scale, then you find that only one note has been changed - the 4th of C-Major has been replaced by the sharp-4th in Lydian.

    Again turning to Govan book-1, there is a handy little list at the top of page 83, from which you will see that if you define the 7 notes of any major scale with the numbers 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 then by comparison to those numbers the Lydian mode is defined by the 7 numbers 1,2,3,#4,5,6,7 .... in other words - the notes of the two scales are identical except for the 4th note, which is sharp in Lydian. And just to complete that picture - the 4th of C is the note F, so in Lydian the note which is changed is F going to F#.

    On the DVD Henderson illustrates this by improvising a bit comparing C-Major scale with C-Lydian mode, and then he plays mixing the two scales together, ie sometimes he plays the 4th as a #4th, and sometimes as the natural 4th. And he say's that in his playing he often mixes those two scales (ie he plays the 4th natural or sharp).

    So here you should be stopping the DVD and experimenting yourself by trying to improvise with mixing C-major and C-Lydian.

    To complete that we should note that what we are doing, for any Major-7 type chords (not just a C-chord, but any maj-7 type chord eg a Bb-Maj-7 chord or a D-Maj-9 chord), is -

    we go up a 5th and play a Major scale (that's the same thing as playing Lydian on the root)

    So to sharpen the 4th - you go up a 5th, and you play a major scale (the 5th of C-major is the note G ... so you play a G-Major scale, and that's the same scale as C-Lydian).

    Now, because you can go up a 5th to play a major scale (ie G-Major scale = C-Lydian), it follows that you must also be able to go up a 5th to play a Major-7 arpeggio .... because a major-7 arpeggio is simply 4 notes from that major scale. In this case we play G-maj-7 arpeggio, which is just 4 notes from the G-Major scale ... it's the notes of a G-maj-7 chord, ie the notes are root, major-3rd, 5th, and major-7th. So to summarise that -

    Go up a 5th and play a Major-7 arpeggio (that's G-Major-7 arpeggio over a C-Maj-7 chord)

    The next option is obvious by comparison with what we just said about the notes of a G-Maj-7 arpeggio. Namely - you can of course also play a Major-7 arpeggio on the root note C .... because the notes of a C-major-7arpeggio are just 4 notes from the C-major scale (ie, again, - root + maj-3rd + 5th + maj-7th).

    Here Henderson says that he tried to learn G-Major-7 arpeggio all over the fretboard. What he really means is that he learned all these scales, modes and arpeggios all over the fretboard until they became instant second nature. So it's essential that you practice all these arpeggio patterns (and the scale patterns and triad patterns) as shown in Govan-1.

    Notice though that because the G-major-7 arpeggio comes from the notes of a G-major scale or C-Lydian mode, that arpeggio contains the #4th of the C-major scale. So that G-major-7 arp will give you the Lydian sound, whereas a C-major-7 arpeggio gives you the usual C-major sound.

    OK, this is already becoming quite a long post, so I'll stop there and just say -

    - obviously what you have to do now is, first transcribe onto TAB-paper everything that Henderson plays when he's discussing the stuff above, and then try improvising yourself with each of those scale and arpeggio options, and of course then try mixing any of the options .... to do that effectively you will need to be very familiar with all the scale and arpeggio patterns shown on pages 80 to 85 of Govan vol-1., and that takes a lot of practice and a lot of thought.

    Finally, to summarise the options above; you can play -
     
    a Triad on the root (C-Maj Triad)
    a Triad on the 4th (F-Maj Triad)
    a Triad on the 5th (G-Maj Triad)

    minor pentatonic up a whole step (D-minor pentatonic)
    minor pentatonic on the major 3rd (E-minor pentatonic)
    minor pentatonic on the 6th (A-minor pentatonic)

    C-Lydian mode = G-Major scale
    that's the same as saying - go up a 5th and play a Major scale

    Go up a 5th and play a Major-7 arpeggio (that's G-Major-7 arpeggio)
    Major-7 arpeggio on the root (C-Maj-7 arpeggio)
     

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michel View Post
    Spent 2 hrs jamming on CMaj7. I should have done this before but i din'nt know how. Now i know. Nothing genious but better that what i use to play. I had fun mixing the Cmaj7 scale and the F and G triad.. Loll
    I know more theory that i can play so for now the Dvd suts me.
    I'l stick there for a while an after i'l go to the next step


    Wonder how much he got paid to wear that restaurant chicken Bbq t-shirt ?
    Hey, I know this reply is very late, but I've been spending rather a lot of time on some mega replies to JonR on the "Scales vs. Chord Tones (for Improv.)" thread .

    Good, so you learnt some new options immediately. And if you go through the rest of the DVD you'll learn dozens more. Which all together multiply up exponentially to give you literally billions of new sounds for new sounding licks that you would probably have never played if you had not spent time learning from something like that DVD.

    As for his T-shirt, it's gone in part-2 of the disk (part-2 is about "musical phrasing").

    Paul Gilbert has also got a joke T-shirt in his first DVD (that DVD was originally two videos, as was the Henderson DVD), only Paul's t-shirt says something like "I Learned to play guitar, you can do it too!" (which is quite a nice way of encouraging everyone watching the DVD).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    I've looked at it. I came up with some different chord shapes...like you said, some of them were not completely correct.

    .
    I think the shapes are correct. They are what he plays. Except, in the list above I added some extra shapes as well .

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarata View Post
    I've transcribed the first lick:

    G# - F# - G - F# - F - D# - E - G - B - D - C

    I think he should have used less passing tones but maybe he was short on time in the DVD.

    Anyway, and this is my newbie oppinion...this lick has so many passing tones that it makes the lick a"passing lick itself, i.e., it only sounds good if used as a bridge between two phrases from the CMaj scale. Playing this lick isolated in a CMaj7 chord context doesn't sound very good.

    And if we use a lot of passing tones, it stops being CMaj scale to become a different thing. Yesterday I came up with a phrase to follow this lick with some passing tones and it turned out to what seemed to be a some mode. It was lated and I couldn't transcribe it but I will try to do it from memory during the weekend.
    From memory, I don't think there are more than just one or two passing tones in those notated lines, But ....

    ... I think if we are talking about whether any particular lick sounds "good", whether it's anything on the Henderson DVD or any lick ever played by anyone, the opinion of whether it sounds good or bad is entirely down to the personal taste of each listener. Right?

    If you are talking about the 4 lines he gives on screen as notation, then I think all the licks sound great. In fact the only sounds I donít like on that DVD are where he is very obviously turning up the synthesiser effect ... but apart from that, for me personally, all the stuff he plays on that DVD is great ... some of the licks are just fantastic and beautiful to my ear ... but it's subjective ...

    ... for example - what would you call a "good sounding lick"?

    Let me try to take some famous examples - purely for my personal taste, just straight off the top off my head :- ... Clapton's opening licks to Steppin Out and Hideaway are beautiful as examples of that genre of electric up-tempo "blues". In fact both those songs are stacked full of great licks.

    Similarly, and coming more up to date - I love the ending lick of Paul Gilbert's song the Gargoyle (a descending sequence of diminished arpeggios). And, on his instructional DVD "Silence Followed by a Deafening Roar", the section called Shred Index has some nice licks which did not even make it into his recorded songs, eg the first lick in E is very effective sounding ... and the last lick in Eb is great, and very similar in it's idea and it's sound to that descending diminished lick which ends The Gargoyle.

    Again with Paul Gilbert - the main very long arpeggio riff is beautiful in Curse of Castle Dragon (he explains it all on "Get Out of My Yard").
     
    Amongst more widely world-famous rock-pop songs it's probably easier to just to mention the name of the whole song rather than try to talk about any particular short few seconds of any one of the licks ... but for example, Mark Knopfler's Sultans of Swing is very effective ... depending on your taste, many people rate Hendrix most famous songs very highly for numerous licks or riffs (eg main opening riff on Voodoo Chile or opening to Purple Haze, and dozens of others).

    Again just straight off my head ... I like the main riff in the Steely Dan songs Bodhisattva and the opening riff to Reeling In The Years.

    If I stopped to think about it for a few min and tried to write of list of all the licks I really like, then it would be a list of thousands of them ... it would probably contain literally hundreds of licks from Jeff Beck alone!

    But that's my personal taste - you might not like that rather quirky unusual sound of Gilbert's descending diminished arpeggio run at the end of Castle Dragon ... you may hate every single one of the 30 or 40 licks which together make up the whole of Clapton's version of Hideaway ... you may think the intro. to Reelin In the Years is just a dreary unimpressive yawn, etc.

    But, take a listen to what Henderson plays in part-2 of that DVD, which is more specifically focusing on musicality and attractive "musical phrasing", eg listen to his 4 examples in the section labelled "Jazz Blues Solo's #1, #2, #3 and #4", see if you like what he plays there ... or listen to what he plays in the section called "Phrasing Through Key Changes" and his first examples there which are Example.7, 8 and 9, which are incidentally examples of following the chord tones to fit against the changing backing chords ... or try his example of the Chick Korea lick which is "Ex.5" in the section "Phrasing Over a One Chord Vamp".

    If you really truly don't like Hendersonís playing on any of that stuff, then this may not be the best DVD for you to be learning from. It probably is the "best DVD" for you in terms of what it explains about what scales and arpeggios to play, and how to use them in musical artistic phrasing, but if you really don't like his sort of playing, and if you really strongly prefer the playing style of some other guitarists, then it really may be a mistake to spend too much time with the Henderson DVD (whatever I think of it), and maybe best if you can find another source eg a different DVD or another book, where you really do love the guys playing style ... you know, just because you don't want to invest too much time & effort learning in the style of Scott Henderson, if really your entire aim is never to play like that but instead to play like say Django Reinhardt or George Benson ... or even Paco Penna or Andres Segovia, in which case you would be obviously barking up the wrong musical tree lol and youíd need to bark up a tree specifically with the fruit of flamenco and classic tuition

    So, just as some info for me - which guitarists do you like? What is your goal in terms of learning a style of playing? Can you name someone who you are aiming towards in terms of how you eventually would like your own playing to become?

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