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Thread: Best Source to Improvise With? (Guitar)

  1. #1
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    Best Source to Improvise With? (Guitar)

    Hey all! I have been practicing quite a lot of scales lately and would like to know the best source -besides another human, of course- to improvise with using said musical scales. I am aware that there exists web pages devoted to the playback of chord arrangements for just such purposes and I'd like to hear some of your favorites as well as some of the dedicated devices in the physical world that work well too. I suspect that what I am seeking in these improvisational tools is highly similar to what you all covet with first priority being great sound and user-friendliness...Thanks always for your advise!

  2. #2
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Backing tracks are all over the Internet.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4x0u...eature=related
    I like the ones that give you the chord changes. Help yourself. I like this one because I'm electric bass and generic scale degree bass lines (R-b3-5-b7 or R-5-8-5, etc.) fit right in. Plus it's one of the jazz standards you are supposed to have in your bag of tricks. The song is in Em, Good luck playing the Em scale note for note and expecting great things to happen. If you want to play a mode over this, not your best choice of a backing track - look for something else. But, you could try the chord tone notes or the chord's pentatonic notes over each chord - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XT0V5...eature=related Copy down the possible combination of "things" you could use.

    Listen to this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NehOx...feature=relmfu

    Hal talked about four note phrases. Yep it helps. A scale or mode taken to the next octave note (the 8) has a total of 8 notes. Pause in the middle to let the melody breath then come back home using the chord's four note arpeggio. Try to get your four note phrases working. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mB9CbmLBs7Q
    Copy down the text that comes on the screen with this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0iZ1j00wSU

    I've been messing around, on the keyboard, with what he said about improvising around the 3rds. Got possibilities. You gotta have something to base your improvisation upon. The tune's chord tones and using the 3rd as a place to leave and then come back to - is one way.

    If you go Modes - check this out: http://scottsbasslessons.com/welcome-to-the-shed

    I really like the jamming tracks that are on the CD you got with your instruction book. The book gives you what you should try over this specific track.

    My point -- having the track and then not having a plan of what to do with that track is time wasted. You have to base your improvisation on something. The tune or the song's chords are a starting point. Play the tune and improvise around the 3rds. Or, at first follow the chords playing the chord's pentatonic scale or the chord tones over them. Pentatonic will give you three chord tones for harmonization and two passing notes for color. Pentatonic scales or chord tones and follow the chords is a safe step one. Of course all this is IMO.

    Code:
    Major Scale Box Pattern - showing chord tones
    
    E|---7---|--R(8)-|-------|---2---| 1st string
    B|-------|---5---|-------|---6---|
    G|---2---|-------|---3---|---4---| 
    D|---6---|-------|---7---|--R(8)-|
    A|---3---|---4---|-------|---5---|
    E|-------|---R---|-------|---2---| 6th string
    That video of Autumn Leaves on the electric guitar - very similar to what we do on the bass - see if you can keep up with the music using some of what we do on the bass when soloing. Play chord tones. Root on 1 and if the song gives you room we add a 5 (R-5). Still have room the 8 is a safe addition (R-5-8-5). After that the correct 3 and 7 can come into the picture (R-3-5-7). The 3 if the chord is major and the b3 if it is minor. With the 7 if the chord is a maj7 the plain ole 7 and if it a dominant seventh or a minor seventh then the b7 fits (R-3-5-b7). That F#m7b5 is R-b3-b5-b7. Am7 is R-b3-5-b7. Measures with two chords you have two beats for each chord. R-5 or R-3 or b3 as the case may be, for each chord, will be all the time you have.

    You've been working on your scales. Which is the correct thing to do, however, just scales by themselves is not the answer to what you asked. OK you have scales down, time to add chord tones into the mix.

    Have fun, it's a journey.
    Last edited by Malcolm; 03-10-2012 at 11:58 AM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm View Post
    Backing tracks are all over the Internet.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4x0u...eature=related
    I like the ones that give you the chord changes. Help yourself. I like this one because I'm electric bass and generic scale degree bass lines (R-b3-5-b7 or R-5-8-5, etc.) fit right in. Plus it's one of the jazz standards you are supposed to have in your bag of tricks. The song is in Em, Good luck playing the Em scale note for note and expecting great things to happen. If you want to play a mode over this, not your best choice of a backing track - look for something else. But, you could try the chord tone notes or the chord's pentatonic notes over each chord - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XT0V5...eature=related Copy down the possible combination of "things" you could use.

    Listen to this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NehOx...feature=relmfu

    Hal talked about four note phrases. Yep it helps. A scale or mode taken to the next octave note (the 8) has a total of 8 notes. Pause in the middle to let the melody breath then come back home using the chord's four note arpeggio. Try to get your four note phrases working. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mB9CbmLBs7Q
    Copy down the text that comes on the screen with this video. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r0iZ1j00wSU

    I've been messing around, on the keyboard, with what he said about improvising around the 3rds. Got possibilities. You gotta have something to base your improvisation upon. The tune's chord tones and using the 3rd as a place to leave and then come back to - is one way.

    If you go Modes - check this out: http://scottsbasslessons.com/welcome-to-the-shed

    I really like the jamming tracks that are on the CD you got with your instruction book. The book gives you what you should try over this specific track.

    My point -- having the track and then not having a plan of what to do with that track is time wasted. You have to base your improvisation on something. The tune or the song's chords are a starting point. Play the tune and improvise around the 3rds. Or, at first follow the chords playing the chord's pentatonic scale or the chord tones over them. Pentatonic will give you three chord tones for harmonization and two passing notes for color. Pentatonic scales or chord tones and follow the chords is a safe step one. Of course all this is IMO.

    Code:
    Major Scale Box Pattern - showing chord tones
    
    E|---7---|--R(8)-|-------|---2---| 1st string
    B|-------|---5---|-------|---6---|
    G|---2---|-------|---3---|---4---| 
    D|---6---|-------|---7---|--R(8)-|
    A|---3---|---4---|-------|---5---|
    E|-------|---R---|-------|---2---| 6th string
    That video of Autumn Leaves on the electric guitar - very similar to what we do on the bass - see if you can keep up with the music using some of what we do on the bass when soloing. Play chord tones. Root on 1 and if the song gives you room we add a 5 (R-5). Still have room the 8 is a safe addition (R-5-8-5). After that the correct 3 and 7 can come into the picture (R-3-5-7). The 3 if the chord is major and the b3 if it is minor. With the 7 if the chord is a maj7 the plain ole 7 and if it a dominant seventh or a minor seventh then the b7 fits (R-3-5-b7). That F#m7b5 is R-b3-b5-b7. Am7 is R-b3-5-b7. Measures with two chords you have two beats for each chord. R-5 or R-3 or b3 as the case may be, for each chord, will be all the time you have.

    You've been working on your scales. Which is the correct thing to do, however, just scales by themselves is not the answer to what you asked. OK you have scales down, time to add chord tones into the mix.

    Have fun, it's a journey.
    There are some excellent backing tracks for improvisation at www.coffeebreakgrooves.com

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by zedrein View Post
    Hey all! I have been practicing quite a lot of scales lately and would like to know the best source -besides another human, of course- to improvise with using said musical scales. I am aware that there exists web pages devoted to the playback of chord arrangements for just such purposes and I'd like to hear some of your favorites as well as some of the dedicated devices in the physical world that work well too. I suspect that what I am seeking in these improvisational tools is highly similar to what you all covet with first priority being great sound and user-friendliness...Thanks always for your advise!

    try out http://www.jamtracksmania.com - there's loads of scale specific backing tracks and a growing number of jazz standards too.. here's a groovy version of Summertime http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8Xk0Oj1KzE

    and Blue Bossa http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jA4iN5Jv70I

    hope that helps..

  5. #5
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    Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by zedrein View Post
    Hey all! I have been practicing quite a lot of scales lately and would like to know the best source -besides another human, of course- to improvise with using said musical scales. I am aware that there exists web pages devoted to the playback of chord arrangements for just such purposes and I'd like to hear some of your favorites as well as some of the dedicated devices in the physical world that work well too. I suspect that what I am seeking in these improvisational tools is highly similar to what you all covet with first priority being great sound and user-friendliness...Thanks always for your advise!
    The SB ( Soundboard ) recordings are streamed only here.. the otherwise recorded ( and usually high quality anyway ) are downloadable... highest quality is advisable... not MP3s etc.. EVER!

    I'd suggest, just for tossing any ol' hat in the ring... start with
    1985 March 28 Nassau Coliseum... whole show..

    http://archive.org/browse.php?collec...ead&field=year

    This offers plenty for you to Jam' with and improvise with... after all these guys are Masters.

    The whole show has lots to offer... for your basic quest.. Tracks "China Cat sunflower" to "Space".. would do well.. and everything be'twixt them. Enjoy
    Last edited by Seraphine; 07-01-2012 at 03:58 AM.

  6. #6
    Jamie Aebersold backing tracks for jazz.
    Krah13
    www.lost-in-guitarland.com

  7. #7
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    What type of music are you planning to improvise over? Here is a great site with instrumental backing tracks for jazz. http://www.learnjazzstandards.com/
    Just remember that there is no shortcut to good improvising. Check this video out...it can apply to guitar, or any other instrument.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDw1igyuvxk and then http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NehOx1JsuT4
    Joey D




  8. #8
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    CT
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    What type of music are you planning to improvise over? Here is a great site with instrumental backing tracks for jazz. http://www.learnjazzstandards.com/
    Just remember that there is no shortcut to good improvising. Check this video out...it can apply to guitar, or any other instrument.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDw1igyuvxk and then http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NehOx1JsuT4
    Joey D




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