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Thread: I can not tell the difference

  1. #1
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    Arrow I can not tell the difference

    I will need gtrdave on this one my question is. I can not tell the difference in my playing when using chromatic licks. Like I know there's got to be a difference when you start on a note that outside the scale and a when you start on a note that's inside the scale and then you add little chromatic outside notes in there. And is it okay to land on the an outside note? Like really I seen in guthrie govan video about how when you play the blues scale and you land on that blues note it hurts the listener ear.

    For example in this lick focuses on the main chord tones of A minor triad. The more important notes are being hammeron while the less important are being pulloff

    E------------------
    B-4-(5)--------------
    G----7-6-(5)-4-(5)----
    D--------------6--(7)-
    A-------------------
    E-------------------

    The notes that are in parenthesis are the A minor triad

    And the notes together it would be D D# E C C# B G# A and thats a total of eight notes all together

    All together this is what I was aiming toward trying to get to sound like A minor when chromatic notes bump up against the chord tones

    E------------4-5-
    B---------4-5----
    G-----4-5--------
    D-6-7------------
    A----------------
    E----------------

    The thing I find interesting is all the notes in this lick are half step apart from the chord tone. Just like chromatic scale is made up of half steps
    Last edited by dwest2419; 07-30-2012 at 08:30 PM.

  2. #2
    Registered User Color of Music's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwest2419 View Post
    I will need gtrdave on this one my question is. I can not tell the difference in my playing when using chromatic licks. Like I know there's got to be a difference when you start on a note that outside the scale and a when you start on a note that's inside the scale and then you add little chromatic outside notes in there. And is it okay to land on the an outside note? Like really I seen in guthrie govan video about how when you play the blues scale and you land on that blues note it hurts the listener ear.

    For example in this lick focuses on the main chord tones of A minor triad. The more important notes are being hammeron while the less important are being pulloff

    E------------------
    B-4-(5)--------------
    G----7-6-(5)-4-(5)----
    D--------------6--(7)-
    A-------------------
    E-------------------

    The notes that are in parenthesis are the A minor triad

    And the notes together it would be D D# E C C# B G# A and thats a total of eight notes all together

    All together this is what I was aiming toward trying to get to sound like A minor when chromatic notes bump up against the chord tones

    E------------4-5-
    B---------4-5----
    G-----4-5--------
    D-6-7------------
    A----------------
    E----------------

    The thing I find interesting is all the notes in this lick are half step apart from the chord tone. Just like chromatic scale is made up of half steps
    Yes, it is - provided it's tolerant and it depends on the effect, but improvisationists are taught outside-back in though you can stay as far out as you wish, but it becomes very undesirable, so respect the dissonance by keeping it controlled. After all, tonal music consists of that consonant and dissonant balance.

    Blue notes or off-color color notes don't hurt; however, there are some that melodies will clearly not tolerate and you'll know which ones are intolerable. Knowing how and when to use such notes correctly and melodies will often let them slide (no pun intended) which is why you hear them often in solos/improvs especially in specific genres.

    This goes for licks, harmony, solos, improvisation.

    Those halfstep-slides is sometimes referred to as planing. Single notes (as you've stated) and chords can do this. You can figure out how and why it's effective. You just don't step up or down a half-step. Something is going on there - quite a few things actually.

    Example: In Eb: ii9-V7#5b9-IMaj9 -----> ii9-bII9-IMaj9. What happened here? Chromaticism in the bass line, but what caused it?
    Last edited by Color of Music; 07-30-2012 at 11:40 PM.

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    Hey you know what rolled upon in my chromatic playing. I always started on a wrong note and then wound up landing on a correct note. But I never thought about the opposite which land on a note thats in the diatonic key and then taking it and landing on a note note is outside the key, and I was able to come with some quite interesting chromatic phrasing licks. I seen guthrie govan do it in his lesson about chromatic playing. But is it reccomendable?

  4. #4
    Registered User Color of Music's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwest2419 View Post
    Hey you know what rolled upon in my chromatic playing. I always started on a wrong note and then wound up landing on a correct note. But I never thought about the opposite which land on a note thats in the diatonic key and then taking it and landing on a note note is outside the key, and I was able to come with some quite interesting chromatic phrasing licks. I seen guthrie govan do it in his lesson about chromatic playing. But is it reccomendable?

    If the song (melody/harmony) can tolerate it. Btw, there are no such things as wrong notes. There are notes that sound better than others; they just sound wrong to your ear.

    The reason you ended on the better note was because your ear wanted consonance.

    To be able to do that, you need an understanding of intervals and consonance vs. dissonance.

    When improvising or soloing it is recommended; however, if you land on an "outside note", make sure it isn't too far outside. You can go as far out as you want for as long as you want, but when your ear says: "I can't stand it!" you've gone too far.

    Play the sequence of all twelve intervals to grasp the consonant/dissonant relationship. (Preferably on a piano to see it easier).

    It makes no difference, but if dissonance it used, make sure it's controlled. By this I mean, make sure it can resolve to something consonant, even if it doesn't actually do so.

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