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Thread: How to approuch melodies?

  1. #1
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    How to approuch melodies?

    So i run in to a little problem so first off i can recognize by ear all interval descending and ascending but only when its just one interval. So how would i go about finding the notes for a melody would I for example lets say the notes where c3 e3 g3 b3 would i try to hear i as
    A: Major third-minor third-Major Third OR
    B: or relative to the c3 a Major Third,Perfect Fifth, and a Major 7th

    this is one question I have never seen asked before so thanks for the replies guys.
    Last edited by NewJackSwing; 08-10-2012 at 08:26 AM.

  2. #2
    Registered User Color of Music's Avatar
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    You can go both ways.

    Song association is a popular technique.

    TTLS - Root P5, M6, P5, P4, M3, M2, Root.

    Or, you could go from note-to-note in groupings:

    By pairs: C-G (P5) A-G (M2) F-E (m2) D-C (M2)

    If you were going by scale degrees: 1-5-6-5, 4-3-2-1 (Arabic Numbers)

    Roman Numerals are used for Harmonic Analysis. These are noted in relation to the key or tonal center.

    C-F-C G7 G7 C - I-IV-I, V-I

  3. #3
    Registered User JonR's Avatar
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    There are lots of interval relationships when it comes to melodies, which basically break down as follows:

    1. Melodic interval with previous note (ascending or descending); can sometimes be extended back a couple of notes;
    2. Harmonic interval with current chord root;
    3. Interval with tonic (keynote), ie scale degree.

    Take "Over the Rainbow". The first melodic interval is an octave. The first note is the tonic, so the second note is too. But the 2nd note is on a different chord: it becomes the 3rd of the minor VI chord (although it can sometimes be harmonised in other ways).
    The 3rd note is then a semitone down - the leading tone of the key, but (usually) the 5th of the minor III chord. And it also forms a major 7th with the 1st note of course.
    All these intervals are heard (even if we don't know what they are), and it's how the tune works as a whole. So the character and identity of all of them is worth studying and being aware of.

  4. #4
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5v9GK...ature=youtu.be 59 minutes of what melody note will work with what other melody note.

    See what is said about turning riffs into melodies. Get yourself four riffs and them mix and match them into melodies.

    1. Our ears like four note phrases. Three notes close together then a leap of at least a 3rd, i.e. 1-2-3-7 or 4-5-6-1 how about 5-6-7-1 All steps (half step whole step) boring, all leaps chaos. Combine the two and you've got something.

    2. After the four note phrase we like to have a pause. Let the melody breath.

    3. Take any scale and pause in the middle, i.e. 1-2-3-4 pause 5-6-7-8 see how the pause adds that little something.

    4. Chord tone notes R-3-5-8 (notice it's four notes) always sound good over any major chord. R-3-5-8 over a major chord, try R-b3-5-b7 over a minor chord. A Google on how to harmonize a melody would be worth your time.

    5. A pentatonic scales over the chord will sound good. R-2-3-5-6 is the major pentatonic. Play R-2-3-5-6 over any major chord. Leave out the 2 --- R-3-5-6 always works over a major chord. The 6 is neutral with major items. The 7 works great with maj7 chords, the b7 works best with minor chords. as will the b3.

    Have fun.
    Last edited by Malcolm; 08-11-2012 at 07:04 PM.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by NewJackSwing View Post
    So i run in to a little problem so first off i can recognize by ear all interval descending and ascending but only when its just one interval. So how would i go about finding the notes for a melody would I for example lets say the notes where c3 e3 g3 b3 would i try to hear i as
    A: Major third-minor third-Major Third OR
    B: or relative to the c3 a Major Third,Perfect Fifth, and a Major 7th

    this is one question I have never seen asked before so thanks for the replies guys.
    It's more about finding what your ear is already measuring off of. If I take your example of c e g b, I'd usually hear it as 1 3 5 then turn the 5 into my 1 and hear the b as it's 3. Of course all this could easily change. If you looped it for example c e g b c, then I'd hear the b as the 7 of c. The point is does it get easier if what we call the 1 is really what our ear is measuring from. To me that's the direction to go in.

    For example 1 b6 b3 1 is a completely different sound than 3 1 5 1. The "intervals" can be the same, but that doesn't mean that the ear is hearing the same perspective.

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