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Thread: Chord Analysis for If I Ever Lose My Faith In You by Sting

  1. #1
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    Chord Analysis for If I Ever Lose My Faith In You by Sting

    Hi there, I've been analysing 'If I Ever Lose My Faith In You' by Sting. I'm trying to understand the theory behind the chord sequences but i'm a bit stuck and would appreciate it if anyone could help me. I've attached the sheet music if it helps.

    I'm particularly interested in the G major chord in the verses. The G chord is not diatonic to the key, but only has the G# flattened to the G different to what would normally be diatonically a G#diminished chord. So I was just thinking of this as a flat 7 chord, although it is a little unusual to hear in a pop song. Alternatively I thought it could be thought of as borrowing from a parallel minor. In A minor the 7th chord is a G Major. Would you agree with either of these statements.

    Secondly the chorus modulates up to E major. I'm interested in how he creates this subtle modulation and also the chords to the chorus.

    The two bars before the chorus are: Amaj-F#m7 before landing on E major. I was looking at this as a IV-ii-I in E. This isn't a cadence though is it so could you help explain why this works so well?

    The chords to the chorus are again not diatonic for half of the chorus. The F#7 and G6 are both outside of the key. I know this is all fine, i'm just wondering what theory might help explain to me how this actually works/sounds good?

    Thanks for your help

    If I Ever Lose My Faith In You.pdf If I Ever Lose My Faith In You Score.pdf

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by alierrett View Post
    I'm particularly interested in the G major chord in the verses. The G chord is not diatonic to the key, but only has the G# flattened to the G different to what would normally be diatonically a G#diminished chord. So I was just thinking of this as a flat 7 chord, although it is a little unusual to hear in a pop song. Alternatively I thought it could be thought of as borrowing from a parallel minor. In A minor the 7th chord is a G Major. Would you agree with either of these statements.
    I now understand that the G major chord is actually borrowed from the parallel minor. In A minor the 7th chord is a G Major which in the key of A major would be referred to as a bVII chord.

    The chords to the chorus are again not diatonic for half of the chorus. The F#7 and G6 are both outside of the key. I know this is all fine, i'm just wondering what theory might help explain to me how this actually works/sounds good?
    The G6 could again be borrowing from a parallel minor. In E minor the 3rd chord is a G Major. I'm still not sure though where the F#7 comes from though.

  3. #3
    i'm no expert, i think the verse wants a I-IV movement, but that second chord Gmajor point out that this "backwards" movement is more in the shape of V-I, V-IV-I more exactly. basically it starts from the V (Amajor) then IV (Gmajor) then I(Dmajor). (so i don't view that G as a borrowed chord from parallel minor). or if we think about it in terms of modes, its the mixolydian mode with chords I-bVII-IV.

    the chorus i'm not sure. i see its modulating a fifth up/forth down, that would be a reasonable modulation. the thing about the chorus is that it starts with the major chord as tonic (Emajor) but this joyfulness lasts only 1bar, the rest points to the fact that it was a minor harmony after all. that G6 is actually a Emin7, it's just highlighting the minor 3rd (relative major). indeed that passing chord F#7 i don't understand it. it should be F#dim, maybe he didn't want to give away the fact that we're in minor not major. being a dominant gives the passage a lydian feel, but generally its a good tension for a passing chord to resolve to the right place. i'm not sure

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