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Thread: GarageBand Not respecting theory!

  1. #1
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    GarageBand Not respecting theory!

    Hello,

    I could definitely be missing something here... but
    I would like to ask a question about a specific behaviour
    from garageBand's notes assignment to a chord
    From the B minor key.

    For the B minor scale we have the following
    notes:

    B, C#, D, E, F#, G and A

    In the automatic chord assignment screen, I instruct
    the software to pick the notes of an F# chord.

    if we follow the notes in the B minor key, the F# chord
    should consist of F#, A, C#....

    but to my surprise it it actually chose:
    F#, A#, C# ????

    where does the A# come from.... its not even
    part of the B minor key??!!!!!

    thanks for any insight as to why this could be happening.
    Last edited by JackOnTheRocks; 02-20-2017 at 01:31 AM.

  2. #2
    MMus, MA, PGCE JumpingJack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackOnTheRocks View Post
    where does the A# come from.... its not even
    part of the B minor key??!!!!!
    It is actually. It's the leading note.
    In minor keys, the sixth and seventh degrees are variables. They can be according to key signature (G and A here for example), or they could be raised a semitone (G# and A#). Both versions are equally correct, the choice depends on context.

    The raised seventh; A to A# in this case, is extremely common - one of the hallmarks of the minor key in fact. It is used before the eighth note (the tonic). Harmonically, this will allow you to have a proper V-i, with the major (rather than minor) chord on the dominant - this gives a greater pull to the tonic and makes the cadence stronger.

    (This is nothing to do with garageband by the way, it's basic music theory)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by JumpingJack View Post
    It is actually. It's the leading note.
    In minor keys, the sixth and seventh degrees are variables. They can be according to key signature (G and A here for example), or they could be raised a semitone (G# and A#). Both versions are equally correct, the choice depends on context.

    The raised seventh; A to A# in this case, is extremely common - one of the hallmarks of the minor key in fact. It is used before the eighth note (the tonic). Harmonically, this will allow you to have a proper V-i, with the major (rather than minor) chord on the dominant - this gives a greater pull to the tonic and makes the cadence stronger.

    (This is nothing to do with garageband by the way, it's basic music theory)


    Ok I see now! So if I was in A minor instead of B minor, the available leading
    notes would be F and G and could be raised as F#(for D maj triad) and G# (for E maj triad)!
    And all before the tonic chord!

    cool thanks .... I'm going to have fun experimenting with this!
    JOR

  4. #4
    MMus, MA, PGCE JumpingJack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackOnTheRocks View Post
    Ok I see now! So if I was in A minor instead of B minor, the available leading
    notes would be F and G and could be raised as F#(for D maj triad) and G# (for E maj triad)!
    And all before the tonic chord!
    Only the raised seventh (G# in this case) would be the "leading note" (also called "leading tone").
    (Incidentally, when the seventh is not raised, it is correctly called the subtonic).

    One of the traditional "rules" of part-writing is to avoid augmented intervals. F to G# would be such an augmented interval, which is why the F is normally sharpened when it appears before the G#. And so the basic melodic pattern becomes F#-G#-A (in A minor, and similarly for other minor keys).

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