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Thread: books for ear training?

  1. #1
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    books for ear training?

    Hello guys..i'm thinking for searching a book for ear training...would you give me some suggestion here? i'm thinkin about "art of tanscribing" from dave celentano..have anyone use this book? is it good ? thx are there any good books for ear training?

  2. #2
    Groovemastah DanF's Avatar
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    You know it's a difficult thing. Obviously you can't learn ear training from a book it has to come from listening. It's been very difficult for me to find the time to sit down and listen, I can read so much faster than just about anything else it's frustrating.

    To get to the point I have Jazz Ear training by Jamey Abersold (www.jajazz.com) it is good but it is not really a book. It is a 4 page "book" (read: pamphlet) with a brief essay on ear training, answers to exercises and a chart of songs to associate with all of the intervals ascending and descending. Then it has 2 CDs of Jamey playing all of the different intervals and eventually chords on piano. I think it's a fantastic system but I will confess I haven't been able to put in the time necessary to reap a lot of benefit. So, with the caveat that you MUST be willing to put in a lot of time I recommend that book. There is also a series by David Baker which I don't own but are probably good as he is a great jazz educator.

    It's only $15 I think and don't let the jazz title turn you off, as I'm sure you know all music is made with the same notes

    -Dan
    "In improvised music you easily can tell who is a guitar player and who is a musician." - Maarten (fellow IBMer)

  3. #3
    The Next big thing the1andonly's Avatar
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    Check out Steve Vai's website. he has a lot of really cool ear training exercises. I've practiced a lot, and still can't do half the stuff in those lessons. I mean, sing thirds harmony to your guitar lines?! that's just insane!

  4. #4
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    ear training

    Here's a few free websites that should help you out...

    http://www.musictheory.net

    http://www.good-ear.com/

    I've used the both and they work great!


    The best thing to do is take a class, buy the perfect pitch cd's, or just jam a lot with friends and figure it out. It'll take a while, but if you practice a lot it'll come more naturally.

  5. #5
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    Ideas...

    You could purchase the ear training application, Ear Master. It's not that expensive and pretty helpful.

    I've just started with the solfege system. I use the exercises in Gunis articles, but have also found some books at our local library. They are written in danish though, but there is not much to read anyway, it's mostly exercises. I don't think it's hard to find some books written in your native language or in english, as the system's advantages are so well known everywhere. Alternatively you could make some exercises yourself - this way you could focus on your weaknesses.

    Another thing I often do is singing a tune - or just fragments, even small improvised bits, and try to find out the intervals...that's a good thing to do, when you're out of reach of any instrument - out shopping, going for a walk etc..., 'cos it's too easy just to check after a few notes at home. You are working in another way, which can be tough at times.

    Asbjoern
    ------------9----------------10-----------
    --7-9-10-----10-9-7-9-10-----10-9-7--

  6. #6
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    I've had little progress with books, CD, interval, quess this sound, etc. But, what has helped is scales and jamming with CD's.

    Jamming with CD's - running up and back down the scale gets old quick unless you start adding melody licks. What has helped me is to realize that I only need 7 notes and from those 7 notes I can make a lot of melody.

    Right now I'm just using the first 4 strings and one scale pattern, humming the tune to myself, and when I get lost I just run the scale till I hit the note I'm looking for.

    Perhaps this is too simple, but it's working for me. Help yourself.

  7. #7
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    Malcolm, I wouldn't consider that specific ear training. That's more a improvising thing...not that ear training and improvising aren't connected - they are indeed. Ear training is learning to recognice intervals, chords and their inversions, chord progressions etc...
    Last edited by Asse; 03-26-2004 at 07:45 PM.
    ------------9----------------10-----------
    --7-9-10-----10-9-7-9-10-----10-9-7--

  8. #8
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Asse, you are of course correct about ear training going deeper than just being able to pick out a melody and play a tune by ear.

    I've tried several of the other methods mentioned and lost interest. The light was too far down the tunnel. I'm having more success finding that next note using scale repetition. That was my point and thought someone else may be in the same boat.

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