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Thread: What do you think of this?? (SIght reading)

  1. #1
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    What do you think of this?? (SIght reading)

    http://www.woodpecker.com/writing/es...rnotation.html


    I don't know what to think of it.

  2. #2
    Laiho's heir guitarist wild_child's Avatar
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    he doesnt mention the addition of tab to the staff to indicate exactly what you should be doing, surely that gives a fully "3 dimentional" notation. but then i guess, you would have to focus on too many things at once.. an interesting point though.
    "Remember, it's all good, everything goes and there ain't no damned rules or boundaries. So get off! Tear it a fresh ***, tear it hard, rip gaping holes in it! Make tracks, leave marks!

    "forever stronger than all" - Dimebag Darrell

  3. #3
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    My 2 cents worth ..... Standard notation is suited to instruments where each individual note is found at only a single position. A guitar does not have that luxury. Therefore tab comes into play. Both have their advantages and disadvantages.

  4. #4
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
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    This guy is an awesome acoustic player!
    "Listen to the Spaces Between the sounds."
    Szulc's Site

  5. #5
    I, Galactus oRg's Avatar
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    I find it better when learning songs and licks and other stuff to have both standard notation and tab. Standard notation can tell you how long to hold the note/chord. Tab can't do that for you unless you put a small little letter at the top signifying the length of the note, etc etc. Not to metion it shows you groups and polyrhythms and tab can't show you that. On the other han tab is much easier to read for guitar IMO. It's an easy simple concept to grasp and actually contrary to what people think tab was used back in the renassaince era to write down music for lute players. Tab has been around just as long as Standard notation really but it just is for stringed instruments and not good for composing when you have multiple kinds of intruments in a certain ensemble. So I think a symbiosis between both is ideal and can only help.

  6. #6
    Registered User JeffN's Avatar
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    I don't think that this should be a reason for guitarists to not learn how to read though. I mean, classical guitarists and other string-musicians can read fine after they learn it, right?

    While standard notation probably isn't the best system around for the guitar, I think that it does a pretty good job since it works with almost all instruments.

  7. #7
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    I agree to the other posts... even though standard notation might not be the best system for the guitar, I still think it makes sense to learn how to read.
    I mean... even though it might be tougher to read on guitar than it is to sight-read as a piano-player, you shouldnīt say "Well, then I just wonīt learn how to read".
    There are many guitar-players who are great at sight-reading.,.. the late Tommy Tedesco is only one example.
    The thing is: if someone would come up with a special notation system for the guitar ( which TAB actually is, if you think about it ), it would take away something very special: I have said before that being able to read standard notation is a great ability to have, cuz you can pick up the music for any instrument, anything you can get your hands on, and read it, hopefully understand it, and play some of it ( well, at least a basic version, maybe you have to transpose etc., but I guess you know what I mean ).

    I recently went to a store which had a bunch of sheet music. Among it was the sheet music for two Bach pieces... "Preludium #2 in C Minor", arranged for piano, and a violin partita.
    I took both, went over, got me a guitar from the rack and played through the pieces. Sure, it took me a while and not all the fingerings made sense, but I enjoyed this a lot, and I was able to hear the pieces.
    So... even though it might be harder to read on guitar, it is possible, and... if you think about it, stringed instruments have been around for a long time. Violins, lutes, mandolins, early guitars. Those werenīt easy to read on either ( still arenīt ), and still, people dealt with it and stuck with the regular notation system.
    Just rambling on here =)
    Eric

  8. #8
    Registered User Unhorizon's Avatar
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    I don't think reading is that important. I started off on piano and am actually a pretty good sight reader. But for guitar, what is the point of reading? Yes, learn the notes on the fretboard, but if you're jamming with some friends, they aren't going to put something in front of you and tell you to sight read it. Chances are, if they wrote something, its in tab, and they will show you how to play it. Practicing reading will make you a good reader, not a good guitar player.

  9. #9
    Registered User JeffN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unhorizon
    I don't think reading is that important. I started off on piano and am actually a pretty good sight reader. But for guitar, what is the point of reading? Yes, learn the notes on the fretboard, but if you're jamming with some friends, they aren't going to put something in front of you and tell you to sight read it. Chances are, if they wrote something, its in tab, and they will show you how to play it. Practicing reading will make you a good reader, not a good guitar player.
    I agree, Jimi Hendrix wouldn't have been any better if he was a fluent sight reader. But I think that standard notation is a very useful tool. It might not be as easy as TAB, but it gives you a much clearer understanding of the music you're trying to play. I guess it really depends on what kind of music you're into though...

  10. #10
    Registered User Unhorizon's Avatar
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    I think everyone should practice reading to some extent, especially in the beginning so you get a good understanding of where the notes are on the fretboard. But standard notation is just too hard to read for most things. Try reading through almost any Steve Vai piece in standard tuning. You might know where all the notes are, but I bet you will have no idea where to play them on the fretboard. You could take the time to figure it out, but in the time you take to figure out HOW to play the whole piece, you could have just looked at the tab and played through the whole thing(I just used Steve Vai as an example, I'm sure no one could play through a whole Steve Vai song on the first try even looking at the tab). So anyway, I practice reading a little, maybe 10-15 minutes a day, because its not one of my goals to become the best sight reader ever.

  11. #11
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    I would like to point out that I wasnīt trying to say that TAB is wrong or bad, or that notation is the only way to go. =)
    TAB sure has its benefits. Some people ( especially instructors ) often say "No TAB allowed". Well, they might have good intentions, but I think that TAB sure has its benefits... it would be tough to show people the exercises in many of the articles if there was only standard notation allowed... it often is important to see exactly where to fret each note. Sure, you can put in position indicators, but I guess you know what I mean...
    Eric

  12. #12
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    I know that Steve Vai is a pretty awesome sight reader. Did he learn this skill to help him with composing? It seems to me that if you study theory then you don't really have to be insane at playing by looking at standard notation. It's seems like just an unnecessary headache.

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