Welcome!
Just a few a ground rules first...

Promotion, advertising and link building is not permitted.

If you are keen to learn, get to grips with something with the willing help of one of the net's original musician forums
or possess a genuine willingness to contribute knowledge - you've come to the right place!

Register >

- Close -
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21

Thread: what guitar and pickups Warren Demartini

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    hull
    Posts
    88

    what guitar and pickups Warren Demartini

    does any one have any idea what guitar and pickups Warren DeMartini from ratt used coz his tone on nobody rides for free kicks *** and does any one have that tab power version
    whaheyyy its luke

  2. #2
    Afro-Cuban Grunge-Pop Bongo Boy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Colorado Springs CO
    Posts
    2,168
    You can catch a glimpse of what appears to be Warrens stable of [very odd] guitars at:

    http://www.brooksguitarworld.com/wdemartini.html
    Pulsing the System with Confirmed Nonsense.

  3. #3
    Registered User LarryJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    569
    Warren liked Charvels for the most part. As for pickups I dont know for sure, but I've read either super distortions or JB's alot of times. Don't trust me on that one for sure though...

    He has a killer tone on everything. The opening chords to 'round and round' still kick my ***.

  4. #4
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,060
    He also liked to use metal picks occasionally... and regarding amps, besides the Laneys pictured on the site Bongo linked to, I am sure he liked to use Marshalls modded by Jose occasionally... just like many other players from that era used to do, like i.e. George Lynch.
    Warrenīs a killer-player
    Eric

  5. #5
    Registered User LarryJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    569
    Yup one of the pics is of Marshalls.

    Who's Jose? I've heard the name before, but I assume most were Lee Jackson modified...

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    hull
    Posts
    88

    chears

    thanks for ur answers people i herd that nobody rides for free and that intro is my pefect sound if i had that sound i could play smoke on the water and be amazied oh yeah and eric how lng you been playing and do you think any one can become good
    whaheyyy its luke

  7. #7
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,060
    Luke, I started when I was 10, Iīll be 27 in May.

    What do you mean by that:"and do you think any one can become good"
    I dont quite get that question... please specify.
    Thanks
    Eric

  8. #8
    Metal Messiah Sakkaku's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    348
    Only 27 ? Dude, I thought you were about 40 something... hahaha

    I'm 22, and started to play when I was 19, but got serious only a year and a bit ago... so I have a long way to go yet.... (practising, practising, practising!)
    Sakkaku
    -Gitarrenmeister-

  9. #9
    Registered User LarryJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    569
    I think he means exactly what it sounds like Eric, I'll start a little rant to answer it.

    Basically yes, anyone can be good. Nobody picks up the guitar (that I've heard of) and just instantly starts playing amazingly. It takes years of practice and dedication just like everything else in life.

    I think some people pick it up easily, because they have a certain level of 'dexterity' in their hands that others might not, or some might be able to focus in and learn theory better than others, cause thats how their brain might work (math/structure oriented people) but to become good, which anyone can accomplish, it really comes down to how much you want it, and how much you practice. Those 'natural gifts' only take you so far, and can be reproduced by those who weren't nessicarily born with them with a little more effort. For instance, Django Reinhardt, Tony Iommi, and Chris Poland all have damadged hands, which prevent them from playing normally, and they all are quite accomplished at each of their respected genres of music, by working around their problem.

    For instance, Steve Vai showed up at Joe Satriani's house with a guitar in one hand, and a set of strings in the other. He didn't even know how to string it up. Years and (hundreds, if not thousands) of hours later, look where he is today. If you read interveiws with any of the pro's, it will say the same thing. They were practicing insane amounts everyday. Stevie Ray Vaughn used to play until his fingers would bleed, and then he'd play some more. It really all comes down to that. If you want to mess around playing random stuff for 30 minutes a day, thats fine, but don't expect incredible results anytime soon.

    I think thats the general consensous you'll get from most players. Good luck.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    hull
    Posts
    88

    whoow

    u total get that yeah because i was on eric site and it said youve been teching since 15 im only 15 now lol"dont you wish ud of started eirlier lol" yeah so i see my mates getting realy good fast and im just ploding along lol i said this loads in outher forums but tha raly pisses me off but i supose ill get there in the end after my g.c.s.e im gonna concentrate more i would realy like to teach so any advise on how to go about teaching would be helpfull
    whaheyyy its luke

  11. #11
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,060
    Ok, now I see. I should probably read more carefully =)
    Anyway, yes, I do think anyone can become good. I am serious. There might be people who are more "talented", but at the same time, that does not mean that those will be more successful or will have an easier time than the people who... well, are not. ( I have problems with using the term "talented" cuz I donīt really care about that stuff and I also think itīs hard to judge that stuff anyway ).

    Take someone who starts out late ( say, in his / her thirties ), or has very small hands or whatever. Those people might have to invest way more work, but eventually, they can be as good as someone who started out at age 8 and has Paul Gilbert-size hands.

    I donīt like the "itīs better to start out early" attitude either. You shouldnīt generalize like that. Sure, it might be good to start out early, but at the same time I think that an 8 year old wonīt learn and practice as efficiently as a, say, 15 year old for the first few years.
    I think that anyone who is willing to work hard, who knows where he wants to go eventually can be good.
    Eric

  12. #12
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,060
    Quote Originally Posted by LarryJ
    Yup one of the pics is of Marshalls.

    Who's Jose? I've heard the name before, but I assume most were Lee Jackson modified...
    I forgot Joseīs full name. But in the 80s, a lot of guys ( especially the West Coast guys like Lynch and DeMartini ) were raving about the Marshalls he modified. Andy Brauer used to have some of his amps in stock, too.
    And yeah, Lee Jackson was quite popular for his modifications back then, too ! I used to own a JCM 800 which was modded by him, and that thing seriously ruled
    Eric

  13. #13
    Metal Messiah Sakkaku's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    348
    Well, I picked it up at 19, but like I've said so many times, I wasn't serious until January 2003... Now I'm 22, and I have oodles of knowledge, and can apply quite a few techniques here and there... some of my playing has to do with reading EricV's articles, and szulc (spelling), and taking advice from Thorsten. But the MAJORITY of my playing is due to that word that a lot of people hear, and for some reason dread = PRACTICE.



    I know where I'm going - my challenge to those starting out is to take the guitar seriously, but have fun at the same time. If you can do that, you'll be a lot happier... Don't fall into traps of thinking 'I'll never be any good'... because you only get out what you put in.

    And to those who are in a rut - try to remember how it was when you first learnt a barre chord, or arpeggio, or scale... Remember how good that felt? Hopefully you can. If you're having a struggle with learning a difficult piece - just think how easy it'll be if you stick at it for a few good solid hours/weeks/months... (depending on how quick you progress). You'll commit it to memory, and then you'll go onto the next stage of your musical development. There is no finish line, but there are rewards along the way! Don't give up.
    Sakkaku
    -Gitarrenmeister-

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    hull
    Posts
    88
    do any of you have the nobody rides for fre powertab i carnt find it and i dont have guitar pro oh and eric did you write the bending steel article the one on bends coz lots of them rocked but i find it hard to get them unisence bends the onees like 12
    15 bend up any tips. onelast thing i dont realy get theroy will this hinder my playing








    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    new progect under go final guitar solo by steve vai
    whaheyyy its luke

  15. #15
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    6,060
    Yes, I did write the "Bending Steel" article.
    The unison bends might be tough at first because of the stretch required in combination with the whole step bend.
    You might wanna try to do unison bends on the G- and B-string at first... thereīs only a major third interval between those strings ( while thereīs a P4 between the e- and b-string )... so you i.e. fret the B on the B-string ( 12th fret ) and the A on the G-string ( 14th fret ) and bend the A to B.
    It might be easier to do it on these strings first, cuz you donīt need to stretch as far.
    After doing that for a while, itīll most likely be easier to execute unison bends on the other string combinations

    Regarding the question whether a lack of theory knowledge will hinder your playing... well, this has been discussed many times, not only here at ibreathe. A lot of people consider themselves "ear players" and donīt care too much about theory and about analyzing stuff. Eddie Van Halen and Jeff Beck are two players who are "ear-players"

    However, I do think that knowing theory makes a lot of stuff easier... understanding things, analyzing things, transcribing and understanding other peoples playing, communicating with other musicians etc.
    If you wanna get into this, check out Guniīs articles here at ibreathe. Theyīre a great place to start. Take it slowly, step by step.
    Hope this helps
    Eric

Similar Threads

  1. 2nd Guitar Recommendations
    By Leviathon in forum Getting Started
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-10-2003, 04:01 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •