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Thread: learn with your ear?what is it mean?

  1. #1
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    learn with your ear?what is it mean?

    hello, i have heard a lot from great guitarists how they've learned guitar all the time..they say to us to just learn it by your ear...what is it mean? is it mean that we must transcribed a lot? please help..thx U

  2. #2
    Registered User Santuzzo's Avatar
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    Yeah, basically what is meant is to figure out songs, riffs, licks, solos etc. just by ear rather than using sheet music (or tablature, or chord charts, or whatever).
    In some way that does mean to transcribe but not in the sense of writing down but just figuring it our by ear using the guitar.
    Often the term to transcribe means to figure out something by ear (with or without the help of the instrument) and then WRITING IT DOWN.

    Lars

  3. #3
    Sweetest of the bees sugarbee's Avatar
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    Learning by ear is easy for some, difficult for others. Can you play a song you know without music? maybe some or even all of it? maybe you can play it, but it isn't exactly the same, and you keep working at it until it sounds to you the same when you play it as when you listen to it. If you can do this, then it's "playing by ear" if you can't do it now, it is something you can probably do in the future if you continue to learn and practice. I'm pretty sure there are some other threads here on ear training. Try doing a search for it if you want more information!

    Hope that helps!

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    hello..thx U for replying..
    i've been doing that ( transcribing ) a lot since i first picked ( learned) the guitar... now i know that i'm on the right track haha thx a lot
    oh ya, should i remembering all sound of the notes on the guitar?thx U

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    Remember the sound of all the notes on a guitar? Well, if you play long enough, that should happen by itself.

    But your ear definitely gets better with experience. I remember my early years of lessons, I brought any song I want to learn to my teacher. He had to show me everything. Then I reached a point where I could hear & figure out simple melodies, but brought him any chord progressions I wanted to learn. Then I got better at hearing those too. Time...it's all about time. And practice.

    Which reminds me...I should be practicing right now.
    Hidden Content . All things guitar: Jam tracks, lessons, blog and more!

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    but what if you're jammin' with a top speed tempo or wanted to play 16 or 32nd notes...can you still use your ear? is it still possible for U to paste what your ear telling you to the fingers? cause..me myself if i hear a fast note in my head.. i really need to slow it down first..paste it to guitar n bring it up to speed ( i can't just paste it into the guitar spontaniously... ) is this abnormal?
    n i heard that some of those shredders out there still need to use the "pacemaker" or "slowdowner" for transcribing the music...
    i'm talkin about spontanity here...."play by ear, not your finger"
    is it still possible to use your ear n fastly paste it to your fingers if you really wanted to shred? is there any magic or trick or secret in here?
    thx U

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    oh ya, forgot to ask you this..do you need a special practise for it? what kind? thx U

  8. #8
    Registered User Malcolm's Avatar
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    Two basic ways to play by ear.

    1. Be able to recognize that the sound is the 3rd interval of F. Now that is formal ear training and will help you with what you were speaking about being able to catch those fast notes and know what they were.

    2. Be able to chicken pick the melody of a song. This is the informal playing by ear.

    I gave up on the formal ear training, however, I can do the informal -- given enough time.

    Remember how when first doing your scales you could hear the bad notes from the good notes, i.e. you know you were out of scale and would go back and get it right. Your Major scale pattern has two octaves -- now you only need one of them, I'd suggest the top 4 strings -- and you only need seven of the notes --- to pick out the melody. Understanding there are only 7 notes to worry about makes it a lot easier.

    You mentioned transcrabing --- just move your Major scale pattern over a different root note and play in the new key. Same tune pattern as before.

    Of course there is more to it than this but this will get your feet wet.

    Have fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeansen
    but what if you're jammin' with a top speed tempo or wanted to play 16 or 32nd notes...can you still use your ear? is it still possible for U to paste what your ear telling you to the fingers? cause..me myself if i hear a fast note in my head.. i really need to slow it down first..paste it to guitar n bring it up to speed ( i can't just paste it into the guitar spontaniously... ) is this abnormal?
    n i heard that some of those shredders out there still need to use the "pacemaker" or "slowdowner" for transcribing the music...
    i'm talkin about spontanity here...."play by ear, not your finger"
    is it still possible to use your ear n fastly paste it to your fingers if you really wanted to shred? is there any magic or trick or secret in here?
    thx U
    No magic trick. It's all about practice and experience. Playing fast without using preconceived patterns is very possible - like anything else it's a skill that takes time to develop. I'm not totally sure what you mean by "pasting" things to your fingers, but my guess would be that more ear training and more comprehensive technique studies will get you on the right track.

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    about "pasting"..i mean that..how can those speed guitarists can think about fast notes n then quickly ( maybe less than 1 second) play it to the guitar.. they must be a very great transcriber if they can do that..
    how can they do such thing?thx U

  11. #11
    ,.¤oOo¤., theox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeansen
    about "pasting"..i mean that..how can those speed guitarists can think about fast notes n then quickly ( maybe less than 1 second) play it to the guitar.. they must be a very great transcriber if they can do that..
    how can they do such thing?thx U
    How do you know where to put your feet when you're running full speed in the forest? The minute you start thinking about it... whoops!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeansen
    about "pasting"..i mean that..how can those speed guitarists can think about fast notes n then quickly ( maybe less than 1 second) play it to the guitar.. they must be a very great transcriber if they can do that..
    how can they do such thing?thx U

    Not sure what your concept of transcription is, but it appears that you have confused transcribing and improvising - they are entirely separate skills. Developing good improvisational skill entails being able to translate your thought process to your fingers instantly. However, that doesn't mean that a player has an idea in his/her head and then plays it on the instrument - it's a much more immediate process than that, with everything sort of happening at once(at least in my experience).

  13. #13
    Groovy Bastard Maarten's Avatar
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    I wouldn't agree with that. In order to improvise coherently I have to think ahead, to avoid turning on the autopilot and just play on muscle memory. When I'm in good condition I can keep thinking measures ahead of what I'm playing.
    Stop talking about modes and start working on your groove.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maarten
    I wouldn't agree with that. In order to improvise coherently I have to think ahead, to avoid turning on the autopilot and just play on muscle memory. When I'm in good condition I can keep thinking measures ahead of what I'm playing.

    That's interesting to me, because I've never approached it like that. I might think about it(my approach to a solo) ahead of time, and as I'm playing I may have a general feeling of the aesthetic affect that I'm aiming for, but as for the actual melodic content, it's all realized in the moment. I know it's a little off topic, but I'd be curious to know what other people think about this. I'll think about it when I'm playing with the band tonight, as well.

  15. #15
    Groovy Bastard Maarten's Avatar
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    I realised that this way of thinking when improvising is really important during one of my guitar lessons this year, and it has been a major breathrough point for me. It's not easy, but when I'm able to pull it of it's just like I fast forward a recording a couple of seconds (without changing pitch ofcourse) and then think of something I'm gonna play. If I don't do that, I end up playing endless melodies because I didn't think of a whole sentence and thus don't know on which note to stop. The point is that you think of larger musical phrases than you can think of when playing directly what you come up with. The amount of time you think ahead is changing all the time, and also the matter of detail. Sometimes can hear the whole phrase exactly, sometimes only the final note, and the contour of the line.
    In the end it's all about imagination, and why I encourage people to train their aural imagination and listen to a lot of stuff, as opposed to approaching everything on a theoretical basis. Improvising is thinking of something to play, and then being able to play it. If you can't play over an altered dominant, it's because you can't come up with melodies that fit over it, not per se because you don't know what scale to use. You can sing happy birthday without knowing that it's built with on a mojor scale.
    Stop talking about modes and start working on your groove.

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