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Thread: Perfect Pitch Club

  1. #61
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    All inclusive

    There are some "freaks of nature" that just have perfect pitch at birth. but for the rest of us, I think it is all inclusive. To acquire perfect pitch you have to master relative pitch and theoretical pitch.
    Joey D




  2. #62
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    Seems to me that what we call an "A" note sounds different depending on the voices. An "A" from a flute sounds much different than an "A" from Janis Joplin or the squealing brakes on an automobile. We as humans, never hear one pitch alone except perhaps in a bad case of tinitus.

    Overtones are everywhere. How do the "perfect pitch" gurus account for this fact?

    Do they only hear what they want to?

    And if so then they are "blocking out" the other tones perhaphs.

    What usefulness could that possibly have?
    Last edited by hairballxavier; 05-12-2006 at 08:33 PM.

  3. #63
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Blocking out

    Quote Originally Posted by hairballxavier
    Seems to me that what we call an "A" note sounds different depending on the voices. An "A" from a flute sounds much different than an "A" from Janis Joplin or the squealing brakes on an automobile. We as humans, never hear one pitch alone except perhaps in a bad case of tinitus.

    Overtones are everywhere. How do the "perfect pitch" gurus account for this fact?

    Do they only hear what they want to?

    And if so then they are "blocking out" the other tones perhaphs.

    What usefulness could that possibly have?
    Well, using Beethoven for example, he wrote symphonies with violins, flutes, cellos, voices, so who knows. All while DEAF... My personal opinion is that perfect pitch is perfect pitch.

    However, perfect pitch is like that little piece of parcley they put on a dinner plate at a restaurant. You really don't need it to get the full effect of the meal.

    I don't have it but I do have a good ear. It has gotten me through enough musical encounters so I really don't care if I ever have "perfect pitch", as long as I can master relative pitch I can achieve the same results.

    Many people do mistake relative and theoretical pitch for perfect pitch because they lack the knowledge of what we are actually doing. What can be mistaken for perfect pitch is really just educated listening in some cases.
    Joey D




  4. #64
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    I'm still working on my relative pitch, but earlier today I was listening (mentally) to a Scarlatti sonata I played for exams recently, and I walked over to a keyboard and plunked the first few notes and they were a match, so I have whatever that is.

    edit : I intensely memorize everything I play (on classical guitar), so I can tell you my fingering (both hands) for every note I play.
    I quit shaving
    but the eyes that glanced at me
    remained in the mirror.

    -Alan Ginsberg

  5. #65
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    ok, I have a strong oppinion on this case that I have already stated, but this thread gets brought back every couple months and there can't possibly be any real additions to this subject. It's all already here.

    I've wanted to say this for a while now, but I've been waiting patiently thinking it would just happen by itself, but no...

    die thread die!

  6. #66
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    actually. perfect relative pitch is when you now a c. and think relative pitch from that tone to find other tones. you can get perfect pitch from perfect relative. if you can learn a c. then you can learn all the other tones. i would prefer perfect. cause then you dont have to count tones from that c you know.

  7. #67
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Not about counting

    It's not really that much of a thinking process for me because once you know intervals and can recognize them they are all the same no matter what key you are in.
    Joey D




  8. #68
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    I think that I have perfect pitch, but I'm not completely sure because I had an unsual experience as a child. I could play any simple melody on the piano without any prior musical training from about ages 4 - 6. Sometimes, when picking out a difficult melody, I would play it only in the key of C even though I knew that this was the incorrect key, at that age! I continued to learn more complex music by ear with no training. At age 8, I took a very basic violin course taught in public school and while I felt "held back" in the classroom, I practiced very vigorously and played pieces by ear at home. Every time that I played a note flatly, I would stop and repeat the entire piece until it was perfectly in tune (which helped me to gain solo parts at auditions)! I took a course in very (very) basic piano (children styled "arranged" pieces) from ages 10 - 12, but I felt that this course progressed too slowly and I eventually stop taking it. I began to progress further on my own and I began to compose (score writing) and arrange music for orchestra on my own with no training using no instrument in front of me. Still, as far as formal training on the piano, I was behind because I only knew how to play by ear and I never had lessons. In theory classes in college, the instructors trained me to use relative pitch and never told me about perfect pitch, I did not know what it was or how to use it. I registered for an eartraining course in college and after sight-singing an example from a textbook correctly, the professor asked if I had perfect pitch. I told him no, but he insisted that I did and set out to prove it to me. One day, when I wasn't expecting, he played a chord containing four notes and asked me to name them and give octave designation. After doing this correctly, he looked at me and smiled, thus proving that I have perfect pitch.
    Since this time, I have tried different approaches to prove to myself if I really possess this skill. If I do, how did I obtain it? These are the things that I have been successful at (even though I still do not feel comfortable saying that I have "perfect pitch":
    Transcribing using no instrument
    Composing using no instrument
    Arranging using no instrument
    Playing pieces that I have never heard only by listening
    Remembering tunes in correct key for a very long time (up to 15 years!)
    Passing online perfect pitch exams with more than 97% accuracy
    I've taken formal piano lessons for three years and I'm already at the skill level of those who have taken piano for 15 years. I've performed some of the most difficult Rachmaninoff and Debussy pieces after only three years of lessons!

    I still have trouble feeling comfortable with using perfect pitch because I was told to use only relative pitch for so long when I started college until one professor realized my potential. When I pick out notes using perfect pitch only, I'm 100% correct. When I use the "perfect relative pitch" that I was trained in, I began to second-guess myself and then I become a semi-tone flat or sharp. How can I overcome this after years of training? Do I really have perfect pitch?

  9. #69
    Did I say that out loud ? joeyd929's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aripitch
    I think that I have perfect pitch, but I'm not completely sure because I had an unsual experience as a child. I could play any simple melody on the piano without any prior musical training from about ages 4 - 6. Sometimes, when picking out a difficult melody, I would play it only in the key of C even though I knew that this was the incorrect key, at that age! I continued to learn more complex music by ear with no training. At age 8, I took a very basic violin course taught in public school and while I felt "held back" in the classroom, I practiced very vigorously and played pieces by ear at home. Every time that I played a note flatly, I would stop and repeat the entire piece until it was perfectly in tune (which helped me to gain solo parts at auditions)! I took a course in very (very) basic piano (children styled "arranged" pieces) from ages 10 - 12, but I felt that this course progressed too slowly and I eventually stop taking it. I began to progress further on my own and I began to compose (score writing) and arrange music for orchestra on my own with no training using no instrument in front of me. Still, as far as formal training on the piano, I was behind because I only knew how to play by ear and I never had lessons. In theory classes in college, the instructors trained me to use relative pitch and never told me about perfect pitch, I did not know what it was or how to use it. I registered for an eartraining course in college and after sight-singing an example from a textbook correctly, the professor asked if I had perfect pitch. I told him no, but he insisted that I did and set out to prove it to me. One day, when I wasn't expecting, he played a chord containing four notes and asked me to name them and give octave designation. After doing this correctly, he looked at me and smiled, thus proving that I have perfect pitch.
    Since this time, I have tried different approaches to prove to myself if I really possess this skill. If I do, how did I obtain it? These are the things that I have been successful at (even though I still do not feel comfortable saying that I have "perfect pitch":
    Transcribing using no instrument
    Composing using no instrument
    Arranging using no instrument
    Playing pieces that I have never heard only by listening
    Remembering tunes in correct key for a very long time (up to 15 years!)
    Passing online perfect pitch exams with more than 97% accuracy
    I've taken formal piano lessons for three years and I'm already at the skill level of those who have taken piano for 15 years. I've performed some of the most difficult Rachmaninoff and Debussy pieces after only three years of lessons!

    I still have trouble feeling comfortable with using perfect pitch because I was told to use only relative pitch for so long when I started college until one professor realized my potential. When I pick out notes using perfect pitch only, I'm 100% correct. When I use the "perfect relative pitch" that I was trained in, I began to second-guess myself and then I become a semi-tone flat or sharp. How can I overcome this after years of training? Do I really have perfect pitch?
    Stop worrying about it and accept the fact that you have this sort of musical ability. Weather or not it is perfect pitch is not relevant in my opinion.

    It is like the fighter that learns to street fight. These type of fighters can take on trained marshal arts experts and win fights with only their street training.

    The more they study the "proper" way to fight, the more likely they are to loose a fight because they start following rules that did not apply in past fights.

    I personally think that you need to forget all this stuff and go back to what you can do naturally. But hey, that's me. You sound like a prodigy of sorts so what you can do naturally really does not need anything else.

    Good luck
    Joey D




  10. #70
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    Post hi

    Quote Originally Posted by Guitardeth
    A friend of m ine has it and we listen to radio he can say: "The chord progression is Asus2, Eb, B and D" and when he shows it on the guitar it's correct. And sometimes when I play and he looks by he says it's not correctly tuned. And his right again.

    But seriously, I wouldn't like to have such a perfect pitch I coulnd't stand listen to music when it's not tuned after A440 or whatever. Music is expression, and the music is only 3/5 of music, the other 2/5 is the carisma, feeling and bodylanguage. It's like talking on msn, you missunderstand a lot, can't express yourself the way you want. You're limited in other words. Like when u use power-tab, the same problems accure.

    Hm, got of the topic a little, sorry

    sorry,Ive just been reading this topic(VERY interesting ) and I am with guitardeth.
    It seems what everyone is trying to tell me is that.
    Pp has some uses.
    Relative pitch is better
    everyone can learn pp
    (and im not being slective here,but i totally agree withc the last one i dont think its some sort of gene nonsence)
    and theyre also telling me some of what its like to have pp,allthough everything anyone who has pp says about what they can do is later contradicted by someone else.

    what i can gather is that people with pp can recognise notes like colours.theyre brain knows them. anyone can learn it, and relative pitch is better and more usefull, and thati should concertrate on that.
    anyway,thats what ive gathered.

  11. #71
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    Perfect Pitch Super course frustration

    I am Sean Creighton and live in Florida.



    I bought the Perfect pitch Super Course somewhere around two years ago and have been doing the drills daily since and have not developed perfect pitch.



    I am currently on the lesson of reaching out and touching any white note on the piano and naming that note. I get anywhere from 1-11 in a row right before a wrong guess. I have listened to the CDs and have done everything stated in the Perfect Pitch Supercourse.



    History: am songwriter and perform at homeless shelters in S. Florida and give away my CDs. I have an awesome job, beautiful wife whos my best friend; have two kids who I have fun with. I kayak, fish, mountain climb, etc.



    Im working on my 7th CD. I've given away about 4 thousand CD with around 12 original songs each on them in the last 6 years. I sing and play allthe instrument on my CDs. People like them. I've written maybe 100 songs. Will send anyone free CD or email you my MP3 songs if you like, no problem.



    I started the perfect pitch course on piano because I was learning to stay in pitch singing also. My primary instrument is guitar.



    I started the Perfect Pitch Super course on piano 2 years ago and within around 9 months I was reaching out to any white key on the piano and naming the note around 80% of the time but was at that level for two months.



    I got frustrated and called the perfectpitch.com site and the person recommended that I stop perfect pitch and do the complete relative pitch course first. So I started the relative pitch course but it was very, very, slow for me. I got stuck for weeks on different drills and then I realized I could no longer go to the piano, press any three keys and unlock them. I could tell during my melody writing that I was losing my hearing that I had gained. So I called the perfectpitch.com site back and the person said to stop relative pitch and to try perfect pitch on my guitar which is my primary instrument which I did.



    One of the problems with the piano is that I travel a lot sometimes for three weeks and I would come back and would have regressed. I actually took that travel piano with me on 3-4 trips (dedicated or manic?). I have a nice travel guitar so I was able to take that with me on all travels.



    Perfect pitch drills on the guitar were difficult when trying to recognize different pitches in different octave, it's less visual than piano where I can quickly check myself on the octave below middle C. The piano is more visual and I am quite familiar with it.



    I then said to myself after minimal progress this is ridiculous and began perfect pitch drills back at the piano.



    So....I am frustrated....I have done the drills/instructions in the Perfect Pitch Supercourse for 20 minutes a day for two years minus a very small bit of time and do not have perfect pitch....



    I am frustrated but am a perfectionist and hate giving up.....so thought I would email you all prior to throwing in the towel...



    One of the reasons I wanted perfect pitch was to improve my singing and most of all be able to hear if I am out of pitch a little when I record one of my songs.



    I put in the time, stayed focused, did all the perfect pitch drills, ...I just don't get the failure.....



    Sean Creighton



    561-289-6354 cell



    561-368-2391 home

    email: sean.creighton@fda.hhs.gov

  12. #72
    Registered User GuitarMaster's Avatar
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    oh my god
    Guitar Hero XI

  13. #73
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    Ok, will someone out there please explain what is meant by the expression"Perfect pitch"? I think that some people do not know the true meaning of the saying .so, someone please oblige with the officially true meaning of the expression..........TAl

  14. #74
    Registered User GuitarMaster's Avatar
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    Absolute pitch (AP), widely referred to as perfect pitch, is the ability of a person to identify or sing a musical note without the benefit of a known reference. (wikipedia)

    the ability to identify the frequency or musical name of a specific tone, or, conversely, the ability to produce some designated frequency, frequency level, or musical pitch without comparing the tone with any objective reference tone, i.e., without using relative pitch (also wikipedia)
    Guitar Hero XI

  15. #75
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    im learning perfect pitch about a month, and i can sing C, D and B

    everytime i want to with no privious note to hear.
    i know i don't have perfect pitch like other people but i believe im getting there and im gonna nail it.

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