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Thread: Training your ear

  1. #1

    Training your ear

    I am having difficulty understanding the articles on ear training. Is there any kind of an exercise or what ever that I can do 30 minutes every day or something?

  2. #2
    Mode Rator Zatz's Avatar
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    Hi Rizla!

    I once told in some thread that, in my opinion, the best way to train your ear on every day basis is to be tuned to audible world around yourself. Try to repeat cars' meeps, sing along with vacuun cleaner (as Guni and myself usually do ), etc.

    Of course if you, lucky you, have a chance and time to find time to train your ear, it'll be good to try the software that we discussed earleir on our forums. EarMaster Pro is one of the bset, I think.

    Zatz.
    Last edited by Zatz; 10-29-2004 at 11:27 PM.
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  3. #3
    Registered User fortymile's Avatar
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    you can just kind of listen to all the intervals and then go through your day trying to call the ones you hear. and you can test yourself in that way.

    a way to get into it at first is to maybe grab an ear-training book that comes with a CD. i drove to california from florida last year and whiled away long stretches of desert by listening to random tones going off. it was wild.
    "All bad poetry is sincere" -- Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
    ,.¤oOo¤., theox's Avatar
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    Combine ear training with instrument knowledge.

    For example, listen to a CD and try to repeat the licks and melodies on your instrument. This is something you constantly will get better at.

    Then there are programs like the free one found at www.musictheory.net that can be very helpful.

    THERE IS NOTHING WORSE THAN A 'MUSICIAN' WITH A BAD EAR. I'd go as far as saying the first thing you should have in order to be called a musician is a good ear.

    So go practicing! It's fun! Learn how to play your favourite melodies by ear (without notation/tab). You'll get a kick out of it, I'm sure!

  5. #5
    Registered User fortymile's Avatar
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    what if you have an excellent ear but really clumsy hands? i can't figure out if i should even call myself a musician sometimes.
    "All bad poetry is sincere" -- Oscar Wilde

  6. #6
    ,.¤oOo¤., theox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fortymile
    what if you have an excellent ear but really clumsy hands? i can't figure out if i should even call myself a musician sometimes.
    That's way better than the other way around! Seriously!

    At least for me it's way more pleasurable to listen to someone - anyone, even a complete beginner - who knows what he/she wants to hear. We all make mistakes, but not all of us play from the heart (= the 'mind->ear->hands' chain). Look at the chain. Ok if you're mind is not right (LOL) ie. you have dull ideas, that's not good. And if your ear doesn't know what's going on in the mind, how can the hands possibly execute the ideas? But if the ideas are fine and you know what the notes are (combined with instrument knowledge ie. you know where the notes are on the fretboard), then SO WHAT if the execution ain't perfect?? That's something you can practice on and improve. The same goes for the ear. A lot of people are just too lazy to bother. They'd rather do mindless technical exercises 10 hours a day. It's hard to be creative. That's where boys are separated from men.

    IF YOU HAVE GOOD IDEAS AND THE PASSION TO MAKE THEM REAL, THE TECHNIQUE WILL FOLLOW NATURALLY, DON'T WORRY.

    I personally think it's better to have your technique a little step behind your musicality. This way you won't 'overplay'.

    Of course everything I say is arguable, but this is the way I feel at the moment.

  7. #7
    Registered User fortymile's Avatar
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    ah that's good to hear. this takes me back to when i first started seriously getting into songwriting. im thankful grunge was all over the place then because it took the focus off of having to be perfect. that ethic probably spawned a lot players, some bad and some talented, but i think overall it's a good thing, because it gets right to the heart of expressiveness, which is the foundation of music. the whole 'if it sounds good, it is good' thing.
    "All bad poetry is sincere" -- Oscar Wilde

  8. #8
    Latin Wedding Band Los Boleros's Avatar
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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Rizla
    I am having difficulty understanding the articles on ear training. Is there any kind of an exercise or what ever that I can do 30 minutes every day or something?
    The best way I know to train the ear is to play Scales and patterns and sing them. There have been many examples of this on previous threads. Get to the point where you can sing a little melody then play it.

    Another thing that I did as a kid is practiced to the radio instead of recorded music. It was always different stuff and I was always challenged to figure out the key and find little melodies.

    Now here is a Big piece of advice:
    When learning to songs, Spend more time learning what the singer is singing than what the guitar player is playing.
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  9. #9
    Deep rhubarb
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    Ear Training

    Basic ear training - learning to recognise intervals - is an essential skill. You can and should do it with your instrument, but doing it out of a playing context - just listening - is invaluable.

    There's a nice bit of freeware called Functional Ear Trainer that works really nicely. Basically, it'll play you a cadence of chords ( I-IV-V-I for example) and then ask you to identify a single interval note. You can chose the chord style (major, minor, etc.) and the interval(s) you want to test yourself on. I can't say offhand where to get it, but if you google "Functional Ear Trainer" you're sure to find it.

  10. #10
    That is all great, thanks for the advice.

  11. #11
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    Thanks HughM for the software suggestion for Functional Ear Trainer. This could be very interesting.

  12. #12
    Melissa ViolinMaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theox
    Combine ear training with instrument knowledge.

    For example, listen to a CD and try to repeat the licks and melodies on your instrument. This is something you constantly will get better at.

    Then there are programs like the free one found at www.musictheory.net that can be very helpful.

    THERE IS NOTHING WORSE THAN A 'MUSICIAN' WITH A BAD EAR. I'd go as far as saying the first thing you should have in order to be called a musician is a good ear.

    So go practicing! It's fun! Learn how to play your favourite melodies by ear (without notation/tab). You'll get a kick out of it, I'm sure!
    This is the method I use constantly. I play violin, and im always listening to Loreena Mckennit or something fun like that. I hear the song, and as it plays I decipher the notes on my instrument. After 2 or 3 times, I'm able to play along with the song on the cd. It works a ton for me, I never found those cd's easy to follow. I prefer my own unorthodox methods.

  13. #13
    Latin Wedding Band Los Boleros's Avatar
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    Hello Melissa,

    Welcome to the forum

    So you are a violinist hey? What music are you into? Do you have some mp3s that you have recorded?
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  14. #14
    In the woodshed rmuscat's Avatar
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    omg!
    A violinist!!!

    more instruments! Yes! We're always happy to have new musicians around!

    hi melissa!!! i suggest you start a thread in the "New Members zone" with some stuff about your musical tastes and abilities (ex that you're a violinist!) ... and also so you get the ibreathe welcome!

    i'll start by welcoming you myself too

    I am having difficulty understanding the articles on ear training. Is there any kind of an exercise or what ever that I can do 30 minutes every day or something?
    hey rizla sorry for not answering your post and hijacking it. I'd follow Zatz tip. Tune to anything. Last time i was at the airport fire alarm went on (routine checks) I sang to it, then i started to harmonize it 3rd and 5ths ... was fun. I could only do it because i have been singing the major scale for the past month for 30m a day. Major scale and the chromatic scale for now.

    Hope that helps
    Last edited by rmuscat; 12-17-2004 at 08:36 AM.
    Edwin Land: Creativity is the sudden cessation of stupidity.

  15. #15
    Registered User Santuzzo's Avatar
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    Link

    I just found this link / these links,

    haven't really checked out any of them yet, but maybe there is some useful stuff .....

    So, check it out,
    here it is : http://www.intimateaudio.com/links.earballz.html


    let me know if any of this helped ....

    Good Luck!

    Lars

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