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Thread: Guitar Techniques

  1. #1
    Registered User metallibeast's Avatar
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    Guitar Techniques

    Hi,
    I was kinda bored earlier so I grabbed one of my many guitarone mags for a quick read. Its Feb 2001 edition if anyone is interested. On the last few pages there is this one ad for a book call guitar techniques. The ad listed many...about 50+ different techniques.

    Here's a couple that I've never heard of b4. Hopefully someone's able to explain what they are.

    Ghost bends
    Oblique bends
    Harp Harmonics
    Bending behind the nut
    Attack Slides
    Bending the neck
    Koto Picking
    Carter Strumming
    Travis Picking

    -Beast

    NP: JS-Strange Beautiful Music

  2. #2
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    Hi there,

    for an explanation of "harp harmonics" ( plus soundfiles ), check out my article about harmonics: http://www.ibreathemusic.com/play/article/38

    Hope this helps
    Eric

  3. #3
    "Bending Behing the Nut" is a technique used for example in the beginning of Black Sabbaths "Iron Man".

    What you do is play a note (it'd typically be an open string with this type of technique) and push that particular string down by putting pressure on it behind the nut. This creates a bend.

    Nothing to flash or impressive but it's something new.

  4. #4
    Ibreathe Music Advisor EricV's Avatar
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    Yeah, the "bending behind the nut" technique is used a lot by country players. Sort of like a B-Bender. What you can do is i.e. bend one note of a chord ( I think itīs easier to do that behind the nut than to do it with the finger holding that particular note of the chord )...
    You can i.e. fret a regular, basic E major, and then bend the G# to an A to get an Esus 4 ( bending the G-String behind the nut, either with one finger of the right hand, or with one finge of the left hand, like i.e the index finger if you fret the chord with the other three fingers... )

    Ghost bend: pretty much the same as a pre-bend... you bend the string before you actually pick it.

    Oblique Bend: This can help you to create pedal steel-like sounds. I actually use this technique pretty often: ), it involves bending up to a note from a whole step or a half step below while holding one or more unbent notes on other strings

    Harp Harmoics: As mentioned above, I wrote an article about harmonics and there, I explain that technique...

    Koto picking: I am not sure about that one, but there is Eric Johnsonīs "koto technique", which might be the same thing.
    It involves using the r.h. index ginger to tap a note while simultaneously plucking that string with the thumb. The left hand frets a note nearby ( same string ) in order to bend or vibrate the note.
    To get this sound, itīs important to pluck the string with the thumb as close as possible to the index finger to get the tinny, koto-like sound. ( Koto is a japanese stringed instrument )
    EJ often pulls off to the note held by the l.h. for an even nicer effect.

    Bending the neck can i.e. be heard at the end of Extremeīs "More Than Words"... Nuno strums the final chord and then bends the neck so thereīs something similar to a little divebomb-sound. You can i.e. do this by pushing or pulling the headstock... actually bending the neck. Be careful, though !

    Attack slide: Dunno

    Travis Picking ( named after Merle Travis ) involves playing a steady bass pattern with the thumb and adding some syncopated rhythms with the fingers of the right hand. Itīs a pretty popular technique in country, folk etc...

    Carter Strumming: Dunno

    Hope this helps
    Eric

  5. #5
    Registered User metallibeast's Avatar
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    Originally posted by EricV

    Oblique Bend: This can help you to create pedal steel-like sounds. I actually use this technique pretty often: ), it involves bending up to a note from a whole step or a half step below while holding one or more unbent notes on other strings
    So this is what this technique is called....I use it from time to time...never knew the name though.

    That bending the neck sounds dangerous...


    -Beast

  6. #6
    Nice, I never thought of bending behind the nut to alter chords but it is an interesting idea. You could do quite a few changes with that.

    But as for that bending the neck technique, hahah, not sure about that one, I'll stay clear of it.

  7. #7
    Resident Curmudgeon szulc's Avatar
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    I used to bend the neck on my old firebird all the time. We used to do lots of Van Halen and Jeff Beck and I had to to emulate the wang bar (since it was a hard tail). You just need to be careful, and not get too aggressive with it.
    "Listen to the Spaces Between the sounds."
    Szulc's Site

  8. #8
    The Next big thing the1andonly's Avatar
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    carter strumming is an old country rhythm style, here's a classic example:

    |------0------0--------3--------3---|
    |------1------1--------3--------3---|
    |------0------0--------0--------0--|
    |------2------2-------------0-------|
    |--3--------------------------------|
    |----------3---------3--------------|

    notice the bass always goes in a root-5th pattern

    and I think attack slides are where you slide up to a note without a distinguishable note before it. it's kind of hard to explain, it'd be notated like this:

    |----/9-----|

    and I think all the other ones were covered in previous posts.

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